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Az Tourist News - June 2003

Az Tourist News - June 2003

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Published by Tony Venuti

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Published by: Tony Venuti on May 28, 2010
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 JUNE-AUGUST 2003
StatewideAttractions
Page 34-35
StatewideFestivals
Page 27-31
GrandCanyon
Page 12-13
1  2  5  0  0  0  R  d  r   M  n  t  h  l   y  
Casinos
Page 37
RV Resorts &Campgrounds
Page 43-46
Mexico
Page 39
Four CornersRegion
Page 20-21
 
S
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2003
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Tourist News
It isn’t everyday thatthe reality of life compelsus to look at our own back-yard. This decade will beone ‘never to be forgotten’for it brought on the kind of change that a global crisiscan cause. Specifically, Imean we are all stayingcloser to home these days.Concerns may keep uson the ground instead of in the air, andthe economy too impacts how we aregoing to be spending our leisure time.Of course we are also working harderand with longer hours. Interestingdynamics occur here. You don’t plan foryour leisure time. It comes on the spurof the moment per opportunity. By defi-nition we have only three to five days inwhich to get away.We now find our own back yard pret-ty interesting. Why... because we looked.Perhaps because you read AZ TouristNews and just coincidentally you havesome time, short term of course, on yourhands. Now it is just a matter of do wevisit page 10-11 the White Mountains,or do we visit page 12-13 the GrandCanyon... what do we do...I can tell you first hand from the let-ters and emails that we have receivedthat many people thank us personally forturning them on to some of these loca-tions. Most of us have been here a longtime and visit many places outsideArizona without ever visiting within...well... we won’t take all the credit. Thechambers and CVB’s throughoutArizona do the best they can to promotetheir locations, but honestly, without aresource like AZ Tourist News you willnot find what we expose you to unlessyou know to go look for it. It is reallythat simple.Have you played our contest yet?You haven’t? I know I can’t say that forthe many that have played to date. OurMay winner of the 2-night stay (withbreakfast) at the historic Arizona Inn inTucson is L. T. Sparks of Escondido,CA. We are giving away some fantasticvacations. You can find out how to playby going online, see page 31.This month’s cover highlightsTaliesin West, Frank Lloyd Wright’smasterpiece in the desert. If you haven’tvisited yet, be sure to include this fasci-nating place in your summer plans.Visitors come from around the world tosee Taliesin West - put yourself amongthem! Another spot visited by thousandseach year is the “almost ghost town” of Chloride. Have you been? Why not visiton June 28 to help celebrate the town’sheritage with Old Miner’s Day.Other featured events in June includethe Summer Festival in St. Johns, theJuneteenth Jazz Splash Festival inCordes Junction and a new event inEagar, the Chrome in the Dome ClassicCar Show. In Sedona Tlaquepaque cele-brates its 30th Anniversary with a com-munity cook-out, gallery openings, fash-ion show, dancers, musicians, potteryand sculpture demonstrations, artlessons, giveaways and more.Read from cover to cover - beinspired! Then choose your location,your favorite event or interesting work-shop or performance, and take to theroad to experience Arizona. Be a touristin Arizona, America’s Natural ThemePark!
Ciao,Anthony Venuti,Publisher
Letter from the Publisher
To reach an account executive, associate editor or tocontact the editor or publisher, call (800) 462-8705. Anyeditorial portion of AZ Tourist News may not be dupli-cated without written permission from the Publisher. AZTourist News © 2003. 60,000 copies distributed monthly.Look for us at visitors centers, hotels, resorts, movie the-aters, restaurants, major attractions, major events, andeverywhere else in Arizona!
Submissions of Articles & PressReleases: Deadline June 15, 2003.Fax (520) 622-7275. Press releases,etc. are always welcomed.
Az Tourist News, P.O. Box 5083,Tucson, AZ, 85703. (800) 462-8705Toll Free (520) 624-2897, (520) 622-7275 Fax, email info@aztourist.com,www.aztourist.com
MAIN OFFICE -TUCSON
Publisher/EditorAnthony VenutiManaging EditorCharlis McVeyArt DirectorAlaena HernandezAssociate EditorPam MarloweAssociate Editor-Tric OrtizTravel DirectorAssociate EditorDeb McQueenAssociate EditorJessica FieldingTravel CoordinatorListings EditorKate SeymourWebmasterSteve WillisDistributionJack DeRapsRobin RandallThe Blue Ghost
A
Z
Tourist News
www.aztourist.com
 
• Ajo C of C• Arizona City C of C• Arizona Tourism Alliance• Arizona Chamber Executives• Black Canyon C of C• Benson/San Pedro Valley C of C• Bisbee C of C• Bouse C of C• Buckeye C of C• Bullhead Area C of C• Camp Verde C of C• Carefree/Cave Creek C of C• Chloride C of C• Clarkdale C of C• Coolidge C of C• Copper Basin C of C
• Cottonwood/Verde Valley C of C
• Dolan Springs C of C• Douglas C of C• Ehrenberg C of C• Eloy C of C• Flagstaff C of C• Globe-Miami C of C• Golden Valley C of C• Graham County C of C• Grand Canyon C of C• Greater Florence C of C• Greenlee County C ofC• Green Valley C of C• Holbrook C of C• Jerome C of C• Kingman C of C• Lake Havasu C of C• Marana C of C• Metropolitan Tuc. CVB• McMullen Valley C of C• Oatman C of C• Page/Lake Powell C of C• Pearce/Sunsites C of C• Phoenix C of C• Pinetop-Lakeside C of C
• Rim Country C of C• Sedona/Oak Creek Canyon C of C
• Seligman C of C• Snowflake/Taylor C of C• Southwest Valley C of C• Springerville C of C• St. Johns C of C• Tombstone C of C• Wickenburg C of C• Willcox C of C• Williams C of C• Winslow C of C• Yarnell-Peeples Valley C of C• Yuma C of C• Yuma CVB
WE ARE PROUDTO BE MEMBERS OF:
Astronomy....................................................................................................33Attractions..............................................................................................34-35Az Tourist News Partners..........................................................................47Birdwatching................................................................................................33Casinos..........................................................................................................37Central Arizona......................................................................................18-19
Colorado River Region...................................................................................9
Contest..........................................................................................................31Events, Featured..........................................................................................24 June Events.............................................................................................28 July Events........................................................................................29-30August Events.........................................................................................30
A Month of Sundays.................................................................................31Ongoing Events..........................................................................................31Sports Events.............................................................................................32Four Corners Region................................................................................20-21Grand Canyon.............................................................................................12-13Guest and Dude Ranches .............................................................................42Itineraries..................................................................................................22-23Lodging............................................................................................................26Mexico.............................................................................................................39Native American Culture.......................................................................36, 38
Northland................................................................................................10-17
Public Lands..............................................................................................40-41Rim Country....................................................................................................19RV Resorts & Campgrounds...................................................................43-46Statewide Map.........................................................................................24-25Southern Az...................................................................................................5-8Tombstone ........................................................................................................5Travel Briefs - International, National & Regional....................................4Travel Writers ................................................................................................26 Visitors Centers..............................................................................................47White Mountains.......................................................................................10-11
Contents
by Steve Willis
AzTourist.com is a multipurposeresource for tourists and residents alike.With only 2 or 3 clicks of your mouse,you can obtain all kinds of informationabout our beautiful state. You can:• Check out events schedules for thecurrent and next 2 months• Read the current issue’s cover story• Check out and enroll in our TravelWriter program, as well as peruse ourcurrent and past Travel Writer articles• Read about attractions throughout thestate• Find lodging for your trips• Purchase travel information andcoupon booklets• Subscribe to of AZ Tourist News andthe Arizona Event Guide Quarterly• Download the current issues boththese publications in Adobe Acrobat(PDF) format.And that’s just to name a few!Most of the information is organizedby region. We divide Arizona into 6regions: Northern, Central, Southern,Colorado River, Tucson Metro, andPhoenix Metro.Tucson Metro includes the communi-ties of: Tucson, South Tucson, CasasAdobes, Catalina, Marana, Oro Valley,and Tortolita.Phoenix Metro includes the cities of:Phoenix, Ahwatukee, Avondale, Buckeye,Carefree, Cave Creek, Chandler, DeerValley, El Mirage, Fountain Hills,Gilbert, Glendale, Goodyear, Guadalupe,Higley, Litchfield Park, Mesa, ParadiseValley, Peoria, Queen Creek, Scottsdale,Sun City, Sun City West, Sun Lakes,Surprise, Tempe, Tolleson, andYoungtown.Within each region are categories. Thecurrent categories are: Attractions,Community Profiles, Featured Events,Lodging, and Miscellaneous.All other sections are organized bytopic.We are currently in the process of revamping the Community Profiles toprovide valuable information to bothpotential visitors as well as familiesdesiring to relocation to Arizona.So after you finish reading this issue,go fire up your favorite web browser andcome help us Celebrate Arizona -America’s Natural Theme Park atwww.aztourist.com.
AzTourist.com
YourOnline Arizona Tourist Guide
EVENT SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
Due to the demand for listing events,we have set the following guidelines. Wehope that these will clarify our criteria.
1. Space Availability:
We simply can-not list all the events we receive. Wereserve the right to select appropriateevent listings and when space is tight,we will give first priority to those whopartner with us.
2. Length:
25-30 words in length or180 characters. This should include thenecessary information such as eventtitle, date, venue, brief description of event, admission and public contactnumber for further information. Thename of the city is not included in theword count.
3. Type:
Tourism / Visitor related... typ-ically this leaves out charitable eventsand events that would draw from onlythe participants’family, friends and likedemographic reach, unless these have aparticularly “western” or Arizona theme.Events submitted on line at
www.aztourist.com
or e-mailed to
Charlis@acttucson.com
will be givenpriority consideration. We have limitedstaff to retype, fax for approval/proofing,etc. If you can help us help you, it willbe in your best interest to do so, for thetime we can save will encourage us tochoose your events.
 Be Sure To Fill Out Our Contest Form on Page 31 for a Chance to Win a Free Trip!
 
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Tourist News
hen Frank Lloyd Wright decidedto built a desert retreat to escapethe cold winter weather of hisnative Wisconsin, he selected a stunning600 acre site of rugged desert at thefoothills of the McDowell Mountains innortheast Scottsdale, Arizona. Here, in1938, Wright and his apprentices setabout building
Taliesin West
. They oftenreferred to the site as their “winter camp,”but the architectural world soon calledTaliesin West “one of Wright’s greatestmasterpieces.”Since its earliest days visitors fromaround the world were drawn to TaliesinWest, and today the site offers a broadrange of tours throughout the year, with aseparate winter and summer schedule tai-lored to the changing seasons.Taliesin West showcases Wright’s bril-liant ability to integrate indoor and out-door spaces - the Cabaret Cinema,Wright’s private office, the KivaConference Room, Music Pavilion andfamous Living Room are all linked byexpansive terraces and walkways high-lighted by shimmering fountains.Wright - usually recognized asAmerica’s greatest architect - usedTaliesin West as his personal home, studioand architectural campus from 1937 untilhis death in 1959. The site still serves asthe campus for the Frank Lloyd WrightSchool of Architecture.Because Taliesin West is still used forthe purposes for which it was designed,visitors have the opportunity to sit inWright-designed furniture and experiencethe structures as Wright intended - a raretreat for travelers accustomed to morerigid limitations at most other historicalsites.Visitors particularly enjoy their stop inthe Taliesin West Living Room, or“Garden Room” as Wright called it.Entrance to the living room is through atypically Wrightian low-ceiling, stone-wall space which leads to a room 56-feetlong by 34-feet at one place and 24-feet atanother. Alarge fireplace dominates thefar end of the room and the architectdesigned most of the furniture. It was inthis magnificent space that Wright oftenentertained his famous guests.The
summerseason runs throughOctober
. No tours are offered onTuesdays or Wednesdays during Julyand August, but the bookstore is openthose days.For visitors looking for a particularlyunique way to view Taliesin West, theFriday evening
“Night Lights on theDesert” tour
is a must. Wright calledTaliesin West “a look over the rim of theworld.” On the two-hour guided nighttour visitors view a carpet of city lightsspread out below, the fire-breathing drag-on, the famous living room and otherspaces, and are treated to light refresh-ments. This tour is offered three times onFriday nights only, beginning at 6:30, 7 &7:30 pm. Reservations are requested, butnot required.The summer day schedule includes theone-hour
“Panorama Tour,”
offereddaily at 9, 10, and 11 am. Knowledgeableguides take visitors to the Pavilion,Cabaret, Wright’s office and the Kiva -and provide interesting details aboutWright’s architectural theories.The popular 90-minute “
SummerInsights Tour,”
is offered daily at 9:30 &11:30 am and at noon, 1, 2, 3 & 4 pm,(and also at 10:30 am in September andOctober.) This tour includes everythingon the Panorama tour plus a visit to thedramatic Living Room.Athree-hour
“Behind the Scenes”tour
includes tea in the colorful diningroom and a visit to the Sun Cottage. It isoffered Monday and Saturday mornings(also on Thursdays in September andOctober) starting at 9 am.A90-minute
“Architecture DiscoveryTour,”
offered daily, June through Augustat 10:30 am & 1:30 pm, is speciallydesigned for families with school-agechildren. Families learn how Wright took everyday shapes and objects - along withvivid colors and striking patterns - to cre-ate buildings that are works of art.To visit Taliesin West, enter the 600-acre site at Frank Lloyd WrightBoulevard (approximately 114th St.) andCactus Road, in northeast Scottsdale. Thesummer and winter schedules are avail-able at
www.franklloydwright.org orbycalling 480-860-2700 ext. 494 or495.
Consider
Bullhead City
...
 “Arizona’s Hottest Destination” 
In Bullhead City you will find big city lifestyle in a community still smallenough to enjoy. Bullhead City is one of the best places in the UnitedStates to choose for active retirement or a second home.
For free brochures please visit the city’s website at
www.bullheadcity.com
Over $250 value for just $10
Expires September 15,2004.Some restrictions and blackout dates may apply.See the passport for details.
How to Order:
Go to
 www.aztourist.com/forms/passport.shtml
and place your order online or call 1-800-462-8705.
The Tucson Attractions Passportcontains more than twenty2-for-1 admissions along withother great savings.
• Arizona Opera• Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum• Biosphere 2• Kino Sports Complex – Tucson Sidewinders• Pima Air & Space Museum• Reid Park Zoo• Tucson Children’s Museum• Tucson Symphony Orchestra• And More!
Frank Lloyd Wright’s
Desert Masterpiece W
Taliesin West photos ©Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

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