Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
16Activity

Table Of Contents

The virtual as Real
The threatened frontier
Where is the 'decentred subject'?
The phantasmic hypertext
The suspension of the Master
Informational anorexia
Saving the appearance
What can meteorology teach us about racism?
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Slavoj Žižek. Cyberspace

Slavoj Žižek. Cyberspace

Ratings: (0)|Views: 751|Likes:
Published by Dan Mihalache
Slavoj Zizek is a Slovenian-born political philosopher and cultural critic. He was described by British literary theorist, Terry Eagleton, as the “most formidably brilliant” recent theorist to have emerged from Continental Europe.

Zizek’s work is infamously idiosyncratic. It features striking dialectical reversals of received common sense; a ubiquitous sense of humor; a patented disrespect towards the modern distinction between high and low culture; and the examination of examples taken from the most diverse cultural and political fields. Yet Zizek’s work, as he warns us, has a very serious philosophical content and intention. He challenges many of the founding assumptions of today’s left-liberal academy, including the elevation of difference or otherness to ends in themselves, the reading of the Western Enlightenment as implicitly totalitarian, and the pervasive skepticism towards any context-transcendent notions of truth or the good.

One feature of Zizek’s work is its singular philosophical and political reconsideration of German idealism (Kant, Schelling and Hegel). Zizek has also reinvigorated the challenging psychoanalytic theory of Jacques Lacan, controversially reading him as a thinker who carries forward founding modernist commitments to the Cartesian subject and the liberating potential of self-reflective agency, if not self-transparency. Zizek’s works since 1997 have become more and more explicitly political, contesting the widespread consensus that we live in a post-ideological or post-political world, and defending the possibility of lasting changes to the new world order of globalization, the end of history, or the war on terror.

This article explains Zizek’s philosophy as a systematic, if unusually presented, whole; and it clarifies the technical language Zizek uses, which he takes from Lacanian psychoanalysis, Marxism, and German idealism. In line with how Zizek presents his own work, this article starts by examining Zizek’s descriptive political philosophy. It then examines the Lacanian-Hegelian ontology that underlies Zizek’s political philosophy. The final part addresses Zizek’s practical philosophy, and the ethical philosophy he draws from this ontology.
Table of Contents

1. Biography
2. Zizek’s Political Philosophy
1. Criticism of Ideology as “False Consciousness”
2. Ideological Cynicism and Belief
3. Jouissance as Political Factor
4. The Reflective Logic of Ideological Judgments (or How the King is King)
5. Sublime Objects of Ideology
3. Zizek’s Fundamental Ontology
1. The Fundamental Fantasy & the Split Law
2. Excursus: Zizek’s Typology of Ideological Regimes
3. Kettle Logic, or Desire and Theodicy
4. Fantasy as the Fantasy of Origins
5. Exemplification: the Fall and Radical Evil (Zizek’s Critique of Kant)
4. From Ontology to Ethics – Zizek’s Reclaiming of the Subject
1. Zizek’s Subject, Fantasy, and the Objet Petit a
2. The Objet Petit a & the Virtuality of Reality
3. Forced Choice & Ideological Tautologies
4. The Substance is Subject, the Other Does Not Exist
5. The Ethical Act Traversing the Fantasy
5. Conclusion
6. References and Further Reading
1. Primary Literature (Books By Zizek)
2. Secondary Literature (Texts on Zizek)

1. Biography

Slavoj Zizek was born in 1949 in Ljubljana, Slovenia. He grew up in the comparative cultural freedom of the former Yugoslavia’s self managing socialism. Here – significantly for his work – Zizek was exposed to the films, popular culture and theory of the noncommunist West. Zizek completed his PhD at Ljubljana in 1981 on German Idealism, and between 1981 and 1985 studied in Paris under Jacques AlainMiller, Lacan’s son-in-law. In this period, Zizek wrote a second dissertation, a Lacanian reading of Hegel, Marx and Kripke. In the late 1980s, Zizek returned to Slovenia where he wrote newspaper colum
Slavoj Zizek is a Slovenian-born political philosopher and cultural critic. He was described by British literary theorist, Terry Eagleton, as the “most formidably brilliant” recent theorist to have emerged from Continental Europe.

Zizek’s work is infamously idiosyncratic. It features striking dialectical reversals of received common sense; a ubiquitous sense of humor; a patented disrespect towards the modern distinction between high and low culture; and the examination of examples taken from the most diverse cultural and political fields. Yet Zizek’s work, as he warns us, has a very serious philosophical content and intention. He challenges many of the founding assumptions of today’s left-liberal academy, including the elevation of difference or otherness to ends in themselves, the reading of the Western Enlightenment as implicitly totalitarian, and the pervasive skepticism towards any context-transcendent notions of truth or the good.

One feature of Zizek’s work is its singular philosophical and political reconsideration of German idealism (Kant, Schelling and Hegel). Zizek has also reinvigorated the challenging psychoanalytic theory of Jacques Lacan, controversially reading him as a thinker who carries forward founding modernist commitments to the Cartesian subject and the liberating potential of self-reflective agency, if not self-transparency. Zizek’s works since 1997 have become more and more explicitly political, contesting the widespread consensus that we live in a post-ideological or post-political world, and defending the possibility of lasting changes to the new world order of globalization, the end of history, or the war on terror.

This article explains Zizek’s philosophy as a systematic, if unusually presented, whole; and it clarifies the technical language Zizek uses, which he takes from Lacanian psychoanalysis, Marxism, and German idealism. In line with how Zizek presents his own work, this article starts by examining Zizek’s descriptive political philosophy. It then examines the Lacanian-Hegelian ontology that underlies Zizek’s political philosophy. The final part addresses Zizek’s practical philosophy, and the ethical philosophy he draws from this ontology.
Table of Contents

1. Biography
2. Zizek’s Political Philosophy
1. Criticism of Ideology as “False Consciousness”
2. Ideological Cynicism and Belief
3. Jouissance as Political Factor
4. The Reflective Logic of Ideological Judgments (or How the King is King)
5. Sublime Objects of Ideology
3. Zizek’s Fundamental Ontology
1. The Fundamental Fantasy & the Split Law
2. Excursus: Zizek’s Typology of Ideological Regimes
3. Kettle Logic, or Desire and Theodicy
4. Fantasy as the Fantasy of Origins
5. Exemplification: the Fall and Radical Evil (Zizek’s Critique of Kant)
4. From Ontology to Ethics – Zizek’s Reclaiming of the Subject
1. Zizek’s Subject, Fantasy, and the Objet Petit a
2. The Objet Petit a & the Virtuality of Reality
3. Forced Choice & Ideological Tautologies
4. The Substance is Subject, the Other Does Not Exist
5. The Ethical Act Traversing the Fantasy
5. Conclusion
6. References and Further Reading
1. Primary Literature (Books By Zizek)
2. Secondary Literature (Texts on Zizek)

1. Biography

Slavoj Zizek was born in 1949 in Ljubljana, Slovenia. He grew up in the comparative cultural freedom of the former Yugoslavia’s self managing socialism. Here – significantly for his work – Zizek was exposed to the films, popular culture and theory of the noncommunist West. Zizek completed his PhD at Ljubljana in 1981 on German Idealism, and between 1981 and 1985 studied in Paris under Jacques AlainMiller, Lacan’s son-in-law. In this period, Zizek wrote a second dissertation, a Lacanian reading of Hegel, Marx and Kripke. In the late 1980s, Zizek returned to Slovenia where he wrote newspaper colum

More info:

Published by: Dan Mihalache on May 30, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/24/2013

pdf

text

original

You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 5 to 41 are not shown in this preview.

Activity (16)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
sanamachas liked this
The Monk(ey) liked this
dave_765 liked this
yasav liked this
amaru.writer liked this
gnraetaet814 liked this
RIGBY liked this
Bahmad82 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->