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State Magazine, January 2001

State Magazine, January 2001

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Published by State Magazine
The January 2001 issue of State Magazine, published by the U.S. Department of State in Washington, DC, features the war between International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs and drug lords; Aviation Negotiations as our Office of the Month; and Bangui, Central African Republic as our Post of the Month!
The January 2001 issue of State Magazine, published by the U.S. Department of State in Washington, DC, features the war between International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs and drug lords; Aviation Negotiations as our Office of the Month; and Bangui, Central African Republic as our Post of the Month!

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Published by: State Magazine on Jun 02, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/24/2012

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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF STATE
January 2001
StateState
Magazine
Fighting Drugs
On the Ground—and from the Air 
 
FROMTHESECRETARY
S
ECRETARY
M
ADELEINE
A
LBRIGHT
2
State Magazine
A
ond  
arewell  
L
ast year at this time, we were relieved to havesurvived Y2K. This year, we have survived oneof history’s closest Presidential elections. As Iwrite, that election’s outcome is still uncertain.What is certain is that the time is fast approaching formany of us to say “goodbye.” I envy those of you who donot have to leave with the change of Administrations, because I love foreign policy. I wish I could do it all my life.It is hard to express in words the honor I have felt servingin a job once held by such statesmen as Jefferson andMarshall, Acheson and Muskie. It is an exhilarating, buthumbling, experience. You always feel there is more to do.When I took my oath of office, I pledged to do my bestto explain the importance of our foreign policy to thelives of our citizens, because without their support wecannot succeed. I am still engaged in that effort duringthese final days and will continue to be a vocal advocateafter entering my new life.Diplomacy is America’s first line of defense. And yet,over the years, a perception has developed that while thePentagon is responsible for “national security,” all therest of us do is hand out “foreign aid.” That is nonsense.State Department operations and programs are integralparts of America’s national security structure. Theyshould be thought of and funded accordingly.I am pleased that, over the past three years, we reversedthe downward trend that was robbing us of people, starv-ing training, slowing modernization and underminingprograms. We are now moving in the right direction, butwe’re barely back to the ground floor. We must continueupward, so the next Secretary isn’t hemmed in by no-winchoices among operations, programs and security. For ournation’s good, we must increase support for all three.I am especially concerned about the challenge theDepartment will face in attracting and retaining the talentand diversity required to excel in the new century. This isthe downside of our highly competitive economy. Stateneeds to be known as a place where interesting andimportant work is done, in secure and modern facilities,and where family needs are taken seriously. That willrequire both additional resources and fresh thinking.We must also continue to adapt our structures and pri-orities. Globalization has broadened the range of issuesthat affect our foreign policy. Our Department was estab-lished to deal with foreign governments, but we nowspend much of our time interacting with nongovernmen-tal organizations and civil society. Around the world, anew generation is coming of age with a novel set of expe-riences, expectations and skills.That is why one of our principal tasks these past fewyears has been to create institutions and arrangementsflexible enough to cope with change. We have done so both internationally and internally. Examples includeNATO enlargement, the WTO, the Chemical WeaponsConvention, the Hague War Crimes Tribunal, the KyotoProtocol, the Community of Democracies Initiativeand the just-signed Transnational Convention onOrganized Crime.Internally, we have merged with USIAand ACDA,forged a closer working relationship with USAID,appointed a science adviser, initiated annual reports oninternational religious freedom, helped lead a globalhumanitarian effort on land mines, created an AdvisoryCommittee on Labor Diplomacy and chaired thePresident’s Interagency Council on Women.Obviously, these initiatives did not just happen. Theyresulted from an enormous effort by all of you to prepareour Department and our country to meet and fulfill thedemands of a new era. That effort has provided a firmplatform for the next Administration.As my departure draws near, I worry that I will nothave time to say “well done” to all who merit praiseand “thank you” to all to whom I am in debt. InWashington, D.C., and around the world, I have beendeeply impressed by your dedication, commitment andskill. Whether you are a member of the Foreign Serviceor Civil Service, a Foreign Service National or a familymember, you are part of America’s team. And you arehelping daily to keep our nation secure and to shape a better future for us all.I will always cherish the memory of my time here,including the friendships I have made, the colleagues Ihave come to know and the history that we have togeth-er helped to shape.Thank you again. Farewell. And keep up the outstand-ing work.
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