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Business Owners Champion Sample Chapter

Business Owners Champion Sample Chapter

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Published by Brad Farris
You've been in business for a while, but you've hit a wall. The business has gotten much more complicated than it used to be, and less fun. Though you are working harder than ever, you aren't making more money. Though you started out with high hopes, you're starting to have some doubts – even second thoughts.

The Business Owner’s Champion: 6 Practices to Build your Nerve and your Business was written to cheer on today’s savvy – yet sometimes discouraged – business owner. With a been-there-done-that attitude, business advisor, public speaker and author Brad Farris tells business owners like it is: You can blame everyone else, but your business is as good or as bad as you make it.
You've been in business for a while, but you've hit a wall. The business has gotten much more complicated than it used to be, and less fun. Though you are working harder than ever, you aren't making more money. Though you started out with high hopes, you're starting to have some doubts – even second thoughts.

The Business Owner’s Champion: 6 Practices to Build your Nerve and your Business was written to cheer on today’s savvy – yet sometimes discouraged – business owner. With a been-there-done-that attitude, business advisor, public speaker and author Brad Farris tells business owners like it is: You can blame everyone else, but your business is as good or as bad as you make it.

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Published by: Brad Farris on Jun 04, 2010
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06/04/2010

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The BusinessOwner’sChampion
6 Winning Practicesto Build Your Nerveand Your Business
ANCHOR ADVISORS
by Brad Farris
 
2
I’ve never worked for a publicly heldcompany. The biggest office I everworked for had just over 300 people init. I’ve never worked more than threelayers down in an organization (e.g.,my boss’ boss’ boss was the BIG boss).So, I’ve always been able to see, prettydirectly, how my work impacted thecompany.
I’ve worked for a lot of different kinds of companies, from a venture-funded start-up, to two brothers who ran theirbusiness “like a family.” I’ve worked forpeople who were billionaires and workedon $100 million deals, but I’ve also workedfor founders who scraped together cashfrom their friends and families and puttheir inventory on a credit card. Thesecompanies made aerospace parts,automotive components, awnings,intercoms, garage door openers … the listgoes on.As different as these jobs were, therewere similarities. The best jobs I ever hadwere ones in which I worked with teamsof 
excellent people
. I worked with peerswho were so good at what they did that Iwas fired up to go to work every day, notwanting to let them down and lookingforward to what I might learn from themthat day. At my favorite jobs I
workedhard
, not because anyone asked me to,but because it made a difference. Thesebusinesses were large enough to havestructure and process, so that we all knewwhat to do each day and how our successwould be judged; but they were smallenough to allow us to make meaningfulcontributions and to see the fruits of ourlabor and how our efforts each day helpedto make progress.This type of opportunity is more prevalentin privately held, founder-led businesses.These types of businesses are in thebuilding stage, creating opportunities forgrowth for the company and for thoseworking inside of it. There are no layers of bureaucracy, or rules and red tape thathold smart, creative people back frominnovating solutions to problems andseizing opportunities. You don’t have tofight through turf wars and entrenchedbureaucrats to bring a good idea to life.There are always new challenges, newcustomers and markets. Invent a newservice today, sell it tomorrow, and it’s onthe homepage next week!But, not all founder-led businesses havethis dynamic. Some businesses aremicromanaged, with no freedom orinnovation outside of the founder’s.Others have so much freedom that noone knows which way is up. Maybe thefounder has the control right, but hasn’tfound the right niche. Or, he doesn’t knowhow to communicate the value thecompany provides so the business isstarved for resources and is working hand-to-mouth. Others have all the work theyneed, but they haven’t priced it right, orthey can’t manage the clients’expectations so they always run 100 milesan hour and get nowhere.Are these types of business owners awareof their shortcomings? Yes, they arepainfully aware; whether they will admit itoutloud is another matter. Of course, agood day will push them to think they aresuperhuman without any faults at all. Butthen there are the not-so-good days,when they’re struggling to make
Introduction
The Business Owner’s Champion
by Brad Farris
 
3payroll or dealing with a personnel issue,and they feel like they don’t deserve tohave their own business. They think,
I’mnot the smart, successful business owner everything thinks I am
.
What if everyonefinds out that … I’m … a … fraud?
First of all, making a mistake here orthere, unless it involves breaking the law,doesn’t make any business owner a fraud.But when all eyes are on you and youcan’t perform, it’s easy to draw thecomparison. Further, your team expectsand wants you to
know everything
, but you can’t know it ALL. So, when theydiscover you aren’t omnipotent, it canreally smart. Believe me, I know. I’m asmall-business owner.But what business owners really feel isfear – fear that they can’t build a businessthat they love, filled with a team of peoplewhom they respect and whom earn thema fair return on their risk. This feardebilitates them, causing them to make aseries of other fear-related missteps intheir businesses.Here’s what you don’t realize: Running asuccessful business doesn’t require anMBA, or a PhD, or even fancy math. Itdoes require you to be honest with yourself, to get good constructivefeedback from your customers, yourteam, and some outside people whom you trust, and to commit yourself tomaking some changes that will feeluncomfortable. And most of all, it requiresthe
confidence
to do all these things.Confidence and fear are at the oppositeends of the spectrum. How do you gofrom being a fearful business owner tobecoming a confident business owner?I’m glad you asked! You’ve come to theright place for your answer.As you read along, you may find yourself identifying with some of the scenarios Iuse. You may be reading this as one of my past clients or as a business ownerwhom I’ve met once or twice, andwonder if I am talking about you or yourbusiness. I assure you that the dynamicsI refer to in this book are common tomany smaller, founder-led businesses.
“If it feels or sounds familiar,it’s because your problems arecommon. So if you find yourself nodding, and looking over yourshoulder, rest assured, you arein good company.”
www.anchoradvisors.comThe Business Owner’s Champion
by Brad Farris

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