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Licorice Roots Help Those With Hypoglycemia

Licorice Roots Help Those With Hypoglycemia

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Published by ThelmaMTA
Licorice always brings to mind the red or black confection by that name. However, the candy actually contains little or no real licorice. However, the licorice root is rich in value. The name licorice actually comes from two Greek words meaning ‘sweet root.’ It is also called Chinese Licorice, Sweet Licorice, Sweet Wood, Kan-ts'ao, Gan Cao, Kuo-lao, and Yasti Madhu, and others. Used in proper doses, licorice is one of the most powerful herbs available today.
Licorice always brings to mind the red or black confection by that name. However, the candy actually contains little or no real licorice. However, the licorice root is rich in value. The name licorice actually comes from two Greek words meaning ‘sweet root.’ It is also called Chinese Licorice, Sweet Licorice, Sweet Wood, Kan-ts'ao, Gan Cao, Kuo-lao, and Yasti Madhu, and others. Used in proper doses, licorice is one of the most powerful herbs available today.

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Published by: ThelmaMTA on Jun 08, 2010
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05/12/2014

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Licorice Roots Help Problems With Diabetes
 by: More than AliveWhen you hear the word ‘licorice,’ you probably think of the black or red candy in long sticks or bite-sized pieces. The candy by that name actually contains little or no licorice. Instead, the real value of the plant is in thelicorice rootitself. The name licorice comes from a Greek word meaning ‘sweet root.’The scientific name is Glycyrrhiza glabra, Liquiritia officinalis. It is also called Chinese Licorice, GanCao, Kan-ts'ao, Kuo-lao, Sweet Licorice, Sweet Wood, and Yasti Madhu, to name a few. Used in proper doses in moderation, licorice is one of the most powerful members of the herbal family.The plant from which licorice is obtained is mainly found in the countries surrounding theMediterranean Sea. The dried plants can grow to over four feet, bearing bluish purple and whiteflowers that resemble the blooms of the sweet pea. To extract the ingredients, the licorice roots arecleaned, ground, and then boiled. The very strong tasting extract, once curdled, is then dried again. Thissubstance is given natural flavors, dissolved in water, and formed in moulds.Licorice has a long rich history. In ancient Greece and Rome, licorice was employed as a tonic and alsoas a remedy for colds, coughs, and sore throats. Licorice has been discovered in the tombs of Egyptian pharaohs, including that of Tutankhamen. The ancient Hindus believed it increased sexual vigor when prepared as a beverage with milk and sugar. As much as 3000 year ago the Chinese maintained thateating the root would give them strength and endurance and they prepared a special tea of it for use as amedicine. In North American folk medicine, licorice was used as a cough suppressant, expectorant,laxative, and treatment for various cancers. Native Americans used it to alleviate pain in difficultchildbirth. Early pharmacists used it as a flavoring and sweetening agent in many of their syrups andlozenges. Today, licorice extracts are popular sweeteners in confections for diabetics and thosesuffering from hypoglycemia. Recently a sample of historic licorice from 756 A.D. was analyzed and

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