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Not by Shakespeare : Correctly Attributing The Most Popular Things That Shakespeare Didn't Say

Not by Shakespeare : Correctly Attributing The Most Popular Things That Shakespeare Didn't Say

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Published by Duane Morin
Don't always trust what you saw in your friend's Facebook status. When I saw you I fell in love? You smiled because you knew? I love thee til the sun grows old and the stars grow cold? Love of heaven makes one heavenly?

All famous quotes, all regularly and incorrectly attributed to Shakespeare. This brief book sets the record straight, pointing those who care at the real authors of these (and more!) famous words.
Don't always trust what you saw in your friend's Facebook status. When I saw you I fell in love? You smiled because you knew? I love thee til the sun grows old and the stars grow cold? Love of heaven makes one heavenly?

All famous quotes, all regularly and incorrectly attributed to Shakespeare. This brief book sets the record straight, pointing those who care at the real authors of these (and more!) famous words.

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Published by: Duane Morin on Jun 09, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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04/26/2013

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Not By Shakespeare
 
Not by Shakespeare
Few things
1
upset a lover of Shakespeare more than to see a quotefly by on Twitter or Facebook attributed our great poet, when we knowvery well that he wrote no such thing. In research for my upcoming book
“Shakespeare for Weddings,” I was deeply saddened to see just how far and
wide this incorrect information has spread. Most of the quote listings anddatabases I found contain at least one of these incorrect quotes. It’s my job to recognize and verify them, and I’ve got the tools at my disposal todo it. Unfortunately most people will run into these quotes because theyhappen to see it on a Facebook status or an email signature. They like it,
they forward it along, never realizing the mistake
2
.
1
Well, this and the Authorship question. Shakespeare may not have written these lines but
the Earl of Oxford most certainly didn’t, either!
2
To celebrate the 30th anniversary of their iconic “Billy” bookcase, furniture giant IKEAproduced a limited edition version covered in Shakespeare quotes. I’m told, thoughI’ve yet to confirm it, that a number of not-by-Shakespeare quotes made it onto the
final product.
Copyright 2010 ShakespeareGeek.com 1
 
Not by Shakespeare
In an effort to turn the tide I’m releasing this excerpt from my book for free.Circulate at will. When you see somebody forward a quote from this list and
call it Shakespeare, send them a copy of this book and say, “Wonderful
quote, I really enjoyed it. I don’t think it’s by Shakespeare, though.” They are
all very nice quotes in their own right, and there’s no reason why people
should continue to associate them with Shakespeare and not give credit to
the original authors.
Expectation is the root of all heartache.
The origin of this quote, in this form at least, is unknown - butit is not Shake-speare.No one has been able to find a reference in Shakespeare’s works
to these words, though it is a matter of opinion whether you might find
something similar that Shakespeare said, that has evolved into the above.
Actually this quote closely resembles the Second Noble Truth of Buddhism,
which is often expressed as “Desire is the root of all suffering.What is
expectation but desiring a certain outcome?
Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.
This is William Congreve inThe Mourning Bride(1697). Shakespeare did say"Come not between the dragon and his wrath," and "How sharper than aserpent’s tooth it is to have a thankless child" (bothKing Lear), which both
seem to be of a similar spirit.
How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.I love thee to the depth and breadth and height My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.I love thee to the level of everyday’s 
Copyright 2010 ShakespeareGeek.com 2

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You think that Shakespeare was poet? Hmmm...
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