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BARBADOS NEWS 6th Feb 1984- Police Open Campaign to Uncover Unlicensed Firearms

BARBADOS NEWS 6th Feb 1984- Police Open Campaign to Uncover Unlicensed Firearms

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Published by Chris Walker
[Article by Charles Harding]
BARBADOS
Anytime now Barbadians could be rudely awakened to find policemen searching the most unlikely places in their villages for hidden firearms. The unsuspecting, and perhaps the innocent, may also be intercepted at road blocks, anywhere between the Grantley Adams International Airport and North Point in St. Lucy, as Police Commissioner, Orville Durant and his men move into phase two of their operation to haul in unlicensed guns.
[Article by Charles Harding]
BARBADOS
Anytime now Barbadians could be rudely awakened to find policemen searching the most unlikely places in their villages for hidden firearms. The unsuspecting, and perhaps the innocent, may also be intercepted at road blocks, anywhere between the Grantley Adams International Airport and North Point in St. Lucy, as Police Commissioner, Orville Durant and his men move into phase two of their operation to haul in unlicensed guns.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Chris Walker on Jun 09, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/09/2010

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COUNTRY
SECTION
POLICE
OPENCAMPAIGN
TO
UNCOVER
UNLICENSEDFIREARMS
Bridgetown
THE
NATION
in
English
6Feb84pp
10-11
[Article
by
Charles
Harding]
BARBADOS
[Text]
Anytime
now
Barbadianscould
be
rudely
awakened
tofind
policemen
searching
the
most
unlikely
places
in
their
villages
for
hidden
firearms.
The
unsuspecting,
and
perhaps
theinnocent,
may
also
be
intercepted
at
road
blocks,
anywhere
between
the
Grantley
Adams
International
Airport
and
North
Point
in
St.
Lucy,
as
Police
Commissioner,
Orville
Durant
and
his
menmove
into
phase
two
of
their
operationto
haul
in
unlicensed
guns.
For
the
police
have
stopped
talking.
Theirappeals
have
gone
mostly
unheeded.
The
amnesty
for
thosewith
unlicensedfirearms
to
surrenderthe
weapons
with
out
fear
of
punishment,
expired
amonth
ago.
So
the
policeare
now
toughening
their
action
andembarkingupona
series
of
strategic
operationsto
uncover
and
capture
what
could
behundreds
of
unlicensedfirearms
sneaked
into
this
country,
or
obtained
through
other
than
legitimate
means.
And
tough
new
laws,
the
enabling
legislation
for
which
is
expected
to
be
tabled
in
the
House
of
Assembly
shortly,
will
also
add
strength
to
the
police
operation,
and
perhaps
give
thempower
to
enter
homesand
other
places
to
search
for
unlicensed
guns.
It
need
not
havebeen
so,
for
last
July
1,
when
the
police
gunamnestybecame
effective,
theholders
of
unlicensed
guns
were
assuredthey
could
havebeen
eligible
to
apply
forthe
appropriatelicences
when
they
had
handed
over
the
illegal
guns.
But
there
was
little
response
to
the
six-month
amnesty,
andup
to
last
weekend,amere
handful
(50
guns)
were
turned
in:
a
surrender
that
is
nowhere
near
policeexpectations.Police
know
there
are
just
over
3,000
licensed
guns
in
Barbados,
a
countrywith
a
population
of
about
275,000.
Yet,although
there
is
no
reliable
estimate
ofthe
number
of
registered
guns,
the
conservative
guess
is
thatthere
are
much
more
than
one
gun
to
91
persons,
as
the
register
oflicensed
firearmssuggests.
17
 
For
concealed
guns
havebeen
entering
this
country
foryears,
andsome
havebeen
manufactured
here
without
police
knowledge.
It
is
believed
that
a
great
majority
of
themwere
brought
in
by
Barbadians
returning
home
from
farm
labour
programmes
in
the
United
States
andCanada.
Merchant
seamen,and
under-the
counterbargains
and
streets
buys
in
world
capitals
wheregun
laws
are
more
liberal
thanthose
in
Barbados
and
other
Caribbean
countries,
have
managed
to
conceal
sophisticated
weapons,
or
somehow
get
past
customs
after
they
step
ashore
at
the
Bridgetown
Port.
Those
without
friends
in
some
places
have
also
discovered
other
means
to
sneak
weapons
of
different
makesand
calibre
into
the
country.
In
fact,at
one
time
during
the
1960s
and
early
1970s,
gunshad
been
entering
Barbados
with
such
frequency
and
numbers,
that
if
they
were
registered,
statistics
would
have
given
one
in
every
ten
Barbadians
a
firearm.
Guns
proliferated
in
one
Barbadian
parish.Villagers
inthat
part
notonly
showed
off
their
"irons",
but
manufactured
them
as
well,
and
it
was
not
un
common
forthe
manufacturer
and
buyer
to
negotiatedeals
over
rum-and-coke
in
the
parish
rum
shops;
or
for
a
sawn-off
shot
gun
or
shot
guns
to
suddenlyappear
during
rum
shop
brawls--that
is
if
amodernday
Don
Juan
from
outside
that
parish
did
not
findhimself
staring
down
the
wrongend
of
an
automatic
revolver
for
attempting
toexert
his
charmona
female
from
the
village.
Guns,
or
thecarryingof
them,
are
not
outlawed
in
Barbados,
but
the
use
of
them
has
been
restricted
by
licencesince
1896.
The
relevant
law
has
been
amendedand
modified
since
then,
perhaps
to
match
the
changing
social
and
otherconditions,
but
has
remained
basically
unchanged
sincethe
1963amendment.The
local
statute
givesthe
Commissioner
of
Police
the
soleauthority
to
issue,
renew
or
revoke
gun
licences;
each
licence
specifyingthe
maximum
number
of
cartridges
(not
exceeding
250)
that
may
be
possessed
at
anyone
time
by
the
licensee,
except
the
amount
in
excess
of
that
number
is
sanctioned
by
theresponsible
minister.
Certain
persons,including
members
ofthe
Barbados
Rifle
Association,
who
use
orcarry
guns
exclusively
for
targetpractice,
gunsmiths,
and
auctioneers
having
guns
in
their
sales
room
for
sale,
are
exemptedfrom
penalty
under
the
act.
The
law
makes
it
clear,
however,
that
"it
shall
be
unlawful
to
sell
by
retail
or
let
on
hire
agun
to
any
person
unless
at
the
time
of
sale
or
hire,
such
person
produces
agun
licence
issued
under
this
Actand
then
in
force,orunless
such
person
is
a
trader
dealing
in
gunsand
requires
the
gun
he
desires
to
buy
for
the
purpose
of
sale
or
hire
inhis
business."
There
are
some
mandatory
provisions.
One
is
that
traders
dealing
in
guns
should
maintain
abook
record
ofthe
description
of
the
gunand
thedateof
its
sale,
in
addition
to
the
nameand
address
of
thepurchaser.
Acopy
of
18

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