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Socialism: NAZI "change" From Republic to Reich by Grigg

Socialism: NAZI "change" From Republic to Reich by Grigg

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Published by PRMurphy
It had taken nearly 15 years, but Adolf Hitler's National Socialist German Workers (Nazi) Party had finally clawed its way to power. On January 30, 1933, Reichschancellor Hitler solemnly swore an oath to uphold the Weimar Republic's constitution. Hours later he convened his first cabinet meeting to plot the republic's overthrow. The first item on that meeting's agenda dealt with what could be called "Fatherland security." Hitler and his cohorts examined a legislative draft entitled Gesetz zur Behebung der Not von Volk und Reich -- "Law for Removing the Distress of People and Reich."
It had taken nearly 15 years, but Adolf Hitler's National Socialist German Workers (Nazi) Party had finally clawed its way to power. On January 30, 1933, Reichschancellor Hitler solemnly swore an oath to uphold the Weimar Republic's constitution. Hours later he convened his first cabinet meeting to plot the republic's overthrow. The first item on that meeting's agenda dealt with what could be called "Fatherland security." Hitler and his cohorts examined a legislative draft entitled Gesetz zur Behebung der Not von Volk und Reich -- "Law for Removing the Distress of People and Reich."

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Published by: PRMurphy on Jun 11, 2010
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From Republic to Reich: Adolf Hitler's Naziregime exploited a terrorist assault on theReichstagBuilding to carry out a pre-positioned strategy to convert the WeimarRepublic into a police state
It had taken nearly 15 years, butAdolf Hitler's National Socialist German Workers (Nazi) Partyhad finally clawed its way to power. On January 30, 1933, Reichschancellor Hitler solemnlyswore an oath to uphold the Weimar Republic's constitution. Hours later he convened his firstcabinet meeting to plot the republic's overthrow. The first item on that meeting's agenda dealtwith what could be called "Fatherland security." Hitler and his cohorts examined a legislativedraft entitled Gesetz zur Behebung der Not von Volk und Reich--"Law forRemoving theDistress of People and Reich."Better known as the "Enabling Act," the proposed legislation was designed to consolidate powerin the hands of the chancellor and his cabinet in the event of a terrorist strike or similar threat toGerman national security. Since the 1918 Armistice that ended World War I, the German peoplehad been battered by revolution, and their economy had been obliterated by depression andhyperinflation. While the Germans were desperate for leadership, they weren't willing to givetheir government absolute power--yet.Hitler and his squalid clique of criminals and degenerates understood that the public mood mightbe altered by a sudden, violent shock, giving the Nazi Party an opportunity to seize total powerunder the pretext of "Protecting the Fatherland." That shock came less than a month after Hitler'sfirst cabinet meeting, when, on February 27th, flames consumed a large section of Germany'sReichstag (parliament) Building. The fire was the result of an arson attack--either by aCommunist saboteur (as the Nazis claimed) or by a Nazi provocateur (to provide the excuseHitler needed to put his program into action). Before the smoke had cleared, Hitler had alreadypresented President Paul von Hindenburg with a draft executive order for protecting "the Peopleand the State." Described as a "defensive measure against Communist acts of violence," thedecree announced that in light of the terrorist attack on the Reichstag, "restrictions on personalliberty, on the right of freeexpression of opinion, including freedom of the Press; on the rights of assembly and association; violations of the privacy of postal, telegraphic, and telephonic
 
communications; warrants for house searches; orders for confiscation as well as restrictionsonproperty, are permissible beyond the legal limits otherwise prescribed."In his memoir Defying Hitler, Sebastian Haffner--a German lawyer who fled to England in1938--recalls that the presidential decree "abolished freedom of speech and confidentiality of the mail and telephone for all private individuals, while giving the police unrestricted rights of search and access, confiscation and arrest. That afternoon [of the day after the decree was issued]men with ladders went around, covering campaign posters with plain white paper. All parties of the left had been prohibited from any further election publicity. Those newspapers that stillappeared reported all this in a fawning, fervently patriotic, jubilant tone. We had been saved!What good luck! Germany was free! Next Saturday all Germans would come together in afestival of national exaltation, their hearts swelling with gratitude! Get the torches and flags out!"But even after the initial decree, Haffner records, there was no visible "sign of revolution"--atleast, not yet. "The law courts sat and heard cases," he recalls. "At home, people were a littleconfused, a little anxious, and tried to understand what was happening." Haffner himself wasamong those relatively few Germans who understood theimplications of President Hindenburg'sdecree. "I consider it a personal insult that I should be prevented from reading whichevernewspaper I wish, because allegedly a Communist set light to the Reichstag," he complained to afellow lawyer. "Don't you?" "No. Why should I?" replied Haffner's injudicious friend.Besides Haffner, few Germans understood that the Nazis were using the terrorist strike as asteppingstone to total power. "Armed with these all-embracing powers, Hitler and Goering werein a positionto take any action they pleased against their opponents," observed historian AlanBullock in his 1953 book Hitler: A Study in Tyranny.
Following the Plan
But the presidential decree was merely an overture. Hitler and his party were determined to seetheirpre-positioned agenda for "Fatherland security" adopted. Following a speech by Hitler onMarch 23, 1933, about two months after the Reichstag fire, the German Parliament--unnervedby the public concern about a possible Communist terror campaign, and intimidated by mobs of Nazi stormtroopers--passed Hitler's Enabling Act. "Its five brief paragraphs took the power of legislation, including control of the Reich budget, approval of treaties with foreign states and theinitiating of constitutional amendments, away from Parliament and handed it over to the Reichcabinet for a period of four years," wrote historian William Shirer in his study The Rise and Fallof the Third Reich. While the Enabling Act explicitly permitted the Reich cabinet to enact lawsthat "might deviate from the constitution," it also specified that the powers of Parliament wouldbe protected.In his speech, Hitler promised that his government "will make use of these powers only insofaras they are essential for carrying Out vitally necessary measures." This was a lie, of course.Between 1933 and 1937, as Hitler's party consolidated control over Germany, the Reichstagwould pass only four laws, including the three Nuremberg Laws that imposed the regime'sodious racialist and anti-Semitic doctrines. On July 14, 1933, Hitler's cabinet enacted a lawcriminalizing all parties except the Nazi Party; by December of that year, all but 20
 
representatives in the Reichstag belonged to the Nazi Party. All of this was perfectly legal underthe open-endedgrant of power given to Hitler through the Enabling Act."Hitler's dictatorship rested on the constitutional foundation of [that] single law," observedBullock. "No National or Constitutional Assembly was called and the Weimar Constitution wasnever formally abrogated.... What Hitler aimed at was arbitrary power. It took time to achievethis, but from the first he had no intention of having his hands tied by a constitution...." Unlikeprevious German chancellors, who had "been dependent on the President's power to issueemergency decrees under article 48 of the constitution ... Hitler had that right for himself, withfull power to set aside the constitution."
Abolishing the States
In his March 23rd address to the Reichstag, Hitler sought to placate those worried that theconfederated German states (laender) would be absorbed into a centralized dictatorship: "Theseparate existence of the federal states will not be done away with." The Weimar Constitutionrecognized and protected the sovereign powers of the various German laender. Each of thelaender had separate elected assemblies, as well as independent police and judicial institutions.Devoted to the modern political dogma called totalitarianism, Hitler condemned the confederatedWeimar Republic and openly announced his intention to abolish it in favor of a centralizedregime. "National Socialism, as a matter of principle, must claim the right to enforce its doctrineswithout regard to present federal boundaries, upon the entire German nation," he wrote in his1925 manifesto Mein Kampf. Once Hitler had absorbed the legislative powers of the GermanReichstag, he and his cohorts targeted the laender for abolition as well, using decrees that--likethe text of the Enabling Act--had been prepared well in advance of the Nazi Party's rise topower.Even before the Reichstag passed the Enabling Act, Hitler and Minister of the Interior WilhelmFrick moved to dissolve the state governments. Their first priority was to centralize control overthe police. Acting underthe emergency decree issued the day after the Reichstag fire, Frick appointed Reich police commissars in Baden, Wurttemberg, and Saxony. Herman Goering,Prussian Minister of the Interior, was already bringing that critical region's police to heel.While centralizing control over the police, the Nazi leadership liquidated the political leadershipof the separate states. A week after passage of the Enabling Act, Hitler and Frick dissolved thediets (elected assemblies) of German states not already under Nazicontrol. A week after thatHitler nominated Reichstatthalter (Reich governors) over all German states; those officials hadthe power to rule by decree. The Reich governors "are not the administrators of the separatestates, they execute the will of the supreme leadership of the Reich," Hitler later explained."They do not represent the states over against the Reich, but the Reich over against the states....National Socialism has as its historic task to create the new Reich and not to preserve theGerman states."Hitler's cabinet fulfilled that "historic task" with passage of the "Law for Reconstruction of theReich" on January 31, 1934. The Reconstruction Law abolished the popular assemblies of the

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This is a very important historical sequence to understand. Whether it's National Socialism (NAZI) or Global Socialism (Communism), it's a clear pattern from freedom to socialism. From liberty, to totalitarianism. It must be understood to interrupt it.
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