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slavery

slavery

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Published by: lnadai on Jun 10, 2008
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slavery.txtThe Project Gutenberg EBook of Slavery and Four Years of War, Vol. 1-2, byJoseph Warren KeiferThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: Slavery and Four Years of War, Vol. 1-2A Political History of Slavery in the United States TogetherWith a Narrative of the Campaigns and Battles of the CivilWar In Which the Author Took Part: 1861-1865Author: Joseph Warren KeiferRelease Date: July 19, 2007 [EBook #22100]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ISO-8859-1*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SLAVERY AND FOUR YEARS OF WAR ***Produced by Ed FerrisTranscriber's note:Footnotes are at the end of each chapter, except at the end ofeach section in Chapter I. Duplicate notes were on adjacent pagesin the book.Right-hand-page heads are omitted.Names have been corrected (except possibly "Hurlburt").LoC call number: E470.K18SLAVERY ANDFOUR YEARS OF WARA POLITICAL HISTORY OF SLAVERYIN THE UNITED STATESTOGETHER WITH A NARRATIVE OF THE CAMPAIGNSAND BATTLES OF THE CIVIL WAR IN WHICHTHE AUTHOR TOOK PART: 1861-1865Page 1
 
slavery.txtBYJOSEPH WARREN KEIFERBREVET MAJOR-GENERAL OF VOLUNTEERS; EX-SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OFREPRESENTATIVES, U. S. A.; AND MAJOR-GENERAL OF VOLUNTEERS,SPANISH WAR.ILLUSTRATEDVOLUME I.1861-1863G. P. Putnam's SonsNew York and LondonThe Knickerbocker Press1900Copyright, 1900BYJOSEPH WARREN KEIFERThe Knickerbocker Press, New YorkTo thememory of the dead and as a tribute of esteem to the living officersand soldiers who served immediately with and under the author inbattles and campaigns of the great American rebellionThis Book is DedicatedPREFACEThe writer of this book was a volunteer officer in the Union armythroughout the war of the Great Rebellion, and his service was inthe field.The book, having been written while the author was engaged in asomewhat active professional life, lacks that literary finish whichresults from much pruning and painstaking. He, however, offers noexcuse for writing it, nor for its completion; he has presumed tonothing but the privilege of telling his own story in his own way.He has been at no time forgetful of the fact that he was a subordinatein a great conflict, and that other soldiers discharged their dutiesas faithfully as himself; and while no special favors are asked,he nevertheless opes that what he has written may be accepted asthe testimony of one who entertains a justifiable pride in havingbeen connected with large armies and a participant in importantcampaigns and great battles.Page 2
 
slavery.txtHe flatters himself that his summary of the political history ofslavery in the United States, and of the important political eventsoccurring upon the firing on Fort Sumter, and the account he hasgiven of the several attempts to negotiate a peace before the finaloverthrow of the Confederate armies, will be of special interestto students of American history.Slavery bred the doctrine of State-rights, which led, inevitably,to secession and rebellion. The story of slavery and its abolitionin the United States is the most tragic one in the world's annals.The "Confederate States of America" is the only government everattempted to be formed, avowedly to perpetuate _human slavery_.A history of the Rebellion without that of slavery is but a recitalof brave deeds without reference to the motive which prompted theirperformance.The chapter on slavery narrates its history in the United Statesfrom the earliest times; its status prior to the war; its effecton political parties and statesmen; its aggressions, and attemptsat universal domination if not extension over the whole Republic;its inexorable demands on the friends of freedom, and its plan ofperpetually establishing itself through secession and the formationof a slave nation. It includes a history of the secession of elevenSouthern States, and the formation of "The Confederate States ofAmerica"; also what the North did to try to avert the Rebellion.It was written to show why and how the Civil War came, what theconquered lost, and what the victors won.In other chapters the author has taken the liberty, for the sakeof continuity, of going beyond the conventional limits of a personal _memoir_, but in doing this he has touched on no topic not connectedwith the war.The war campaigns cover the first one in Western Virginia, 1861;others in Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama, 1862; inWest Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, 1863; and inVirginia, 1864; ending with the capture of Richmond and Petersburg,the battles of Five Forks and Sailor's Creek, and the surrender ofLee to Grant at Appomattox, 1865. A chapter on the New York riotsof 1863, also one on the "Peace Negotiations," will be found, eachin its proper place.Personal mention and descriptions of many officers known to thewriter are given; also war incidents deemed to be of interest tothe reader.But few generalizations are indulged in either as to events,principles, or the character of men; instead, facts are given fromwhich generalizations may be formed.The author is indebted to his friends, General George D. Ruggles(General Meade's Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac,late Adjutant-General, U.S.A.), for important data furnished fromthe War Department, and to his particular friends, both in peacePage 3

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