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Not gone but forgotten: The urgent need for a more humane asylum system

Not gone but forgotten: The urgent need for a more humane asylum system

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Published by British Red Cross
The British Red Cross is supporting an increasing number of refused asylum seekers in the UK who find themselves destitute. As a leading humanitarian organisation we believe that we have a responsibility to respond to their specific needs in times of crisis. Many of these asylum seekers come to us as a last resort,
having exhausted all alternatives, with nowhere
else to turn.

In Not gone, but forgotten we focus on the humanitarian situation facing refused asylum seekers who remain in the UK, and make recommendations on how to develop a more humane asylum system, which is so urgently
needed.
The British Red Cross is supporting an increasing number of refused asylum seekers in the UK who find themselves destitute. As a leading humanitarian organisation we believe that we have a responsibility to respond to their specific needs in times of crisis. Many of these asylum seekers come to us as a last resort,
having exhausted all alternatives, with nowhere
else to turn.

In Not gone, but forgotten we focus on the humanitarian situation facing refused asylum seekers who remain in the UK, and make recommendations on how to develop a more humane asylum system, which is so urgently
needed.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: British Red Cross on Jun 14, 2010
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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07/31/2013

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Not gone,
but forgotten
The urgent need for a more
humane asylum system

British Red Cross
44 Moorfelds
London
EC2Y 9AL

Tel 0844 871 11 11
Fax 020 7562 2000
ISBN 978-0-900228-07-0
redcross.org.uk
The British Red Cross Society Incorporated by Royal Charter 1908 is a charity

registered in England and Wales (220949) and Scotland (SC037738).
Published June 2010
Photos: © Layton Thompson, Jonathan Banks

“This powerul and moving report deserves
serious attention. The human cost o
destitution among people who have sought
our protection is terrible, and the case
or immediate action is compelling.”

Donna Covey
Chie Executive o Reugee Council

“The British Red Cross provides vital support
to some o the most vulnerable people who
have fed war and persecution. I very much
welcome this report, which sheds light on the
hidden plight o those at the end o the asylum
process or whom return is not an option.”

Roland Schilling
UNHCR Representative in the UK

For a hundred and fty years the Red Cross
has been caring or human casualties. Many
o the neediest people are drawn to the
Red Cross because o their commitment to
alleviating suering wherever and whenever
they can. In this report the British Red Cross
aces us with the depth o suering they
encounter within British society.

Not gone, but orgotten tells us things about

ourselves we would rather not know.
It conronts us with the case histories o
people who came to Britain or sanctuary
and ound themselves destitute on our streets.

As a Commissioner on the Independent
Asylum Commission (2008), with my
colleagues I heard the stories o people whose
experience is like that o those whose voices
we hear in this report. There is no question
about the depth o suering o those who are
reused asylum and fnd themselves destitute.
The commitment o the British Red Cross to
the ending o destitution, to the protection
o children, to permission to work, and access
to healthcare is a commitment to undamental
human rights. It is a commitment to alleviate
the suering o those who are casualties
twice over: frst rom whatever traumatic
circumstances caused them to leave their
country o origin and second rom the
workings o the UK asylum system.

This report is authoritative because it speaks
with the voice o experience. What the British
Red Cross is doing or destitute reused asylum
seekers is antastic.Not gone, but orgotten
comes at a time, just ater a general election,
when we all want to see new political initiatives.

The report closes with the words o one
destitute asylum seeker: ‘I hope I have the
strength to carry on standing’. It leaves me
thinking, ‘I hope I have the strength to carry
on fghting – or asylum without destitution.’

Nicholas Sagovsky
Canon Theologian, Westminster Abbey
Foreword
3
Summary

The British Red Cross is supporting an
increasing number o reused asylum seekers
in the UK who fnd themselves destitute. As a
leading humanitarian organisation we believe
that we have a responsibility to respond to
their specifc needs in times o crisis. Many o
these asylum seekers come to us as a last resort,
having exhausted all alternatives, with nowhere
else to turn.

In Not gone, but orgotten we ocus on the
humanitarian situation acing reused asylum
seekers who remain in the UK, and make
recommendations on how to develop a more
humane asylum system, which is so urgently
needed. As one o a number o voluntary
organisations who deliver support to this
vulnerable group, in this report we draw on
the fndings o a British Red Cross survey
and also rom the direct experiences o the
reused asylum seekers we help and support.
Based on this evidence, we suggest our policy
recommendations that would improve the
humanitarian situation o this vulnerable group.

We believe that the government and the
political parties should build a consensus and
address the shameul incidents o destitution
acing reused asylum seekers in the UK.

The British Red Cross supports the ollowing
changes to the asylum system:

1. The adoption o the principle that
destitution should not be an outcome
o the asylum system.

2. Additional support or all destitute reused
asylum seekers with dependent children.

3. An end-to-end asylum support structure,
including permission to work, until the
applicant is either removed or granted
leave to remain.

4. An entitlement to healthcare throughout
the asylum process until removal or granted
leave to remain.

Giving ood to destitute asylum seekers
here is not very dierent rom handing out
ood rom the back o lorries in the Sudan.
The humanitarian need is the same.

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Cindy John added this note
My Name is Lara from usa. i am really happy to share my life testimony on this forum because the sickness of HIV that i think is impossible to cure was possible when i meet a grate spell caster, i know so many people have same problem which they are finding difficult to solve. i have been sick for over 4 years now. i have been to so many hospitals and i could not get any solution to my sickness.
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