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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected fromAryabhatt)Jump to:navigation,search 
 For other uses, see Aryabhata (disambiguation).
Statue of Aryabhata on the grounds of IUCAA,Pune. As there is no known information regarding his appearance, any image of Aryabhataoriginates from an artist's conception.
Aryabhata
(IAST:
ryabha
a;Sanskrit:
ÄìêÝÂ
) (476±550 CE) was thefirst in the line of greatmathematician-astronomersfrom the classical age of Indian mathematicsandIndian astronomy. His most famous works are the
 Aryabhatiya
(499 CE, when he was 23 years old) and the
 Arya- siddhanta
.
Biog
raphy
 
[edi
t]
N
am
e
 
While there is a tendency to misspell his name as "Aryabhatta" byanalogy with other names having the " bhatta" suffix, his name is properly spelled Aryabhata: every astronomical text spells his namethus,
[1]
includingBrahmagupta's references to him "in more than ahundred places by name".
[2]
Furthermore, in most instances"Aryabhatta" does not fit the metre either.
[1]
 
Bi
rth
 
Aryabhata mentions in the
 Aryabhatiya
that it was composed 3,600years into theKali Yuga, when he was 23 years old. This corresponds to499 CE, and implies that he was born in 476 CE.
[1]
 Aryabhata provides no information about his place of birth. The onlyinformation comes fromBhskara I, who describes Aryabhata as
makya
, "one belonging to the
amaka
country." While
amaka
wasoriginally situated in the northwest of India, it is widely attested that,during the Buddha's time, a branch of the Amaka people settled in theregion between the NarmadaandGodavaririvers, in the South Gujarat±   North Maharashtra region of central India. Aryabhata is believed to have been born there.
[1][3]
However, early Buddhist texts describe Ashmaka as being further south, in
dakshinapath
or theDeccan, while other textsdescribe the Ashmakas as having foughtAlexander , which would putthem further north.
[3]
 
[edi
t]
Wo
rk 
 
It is fairly certain that, at some point, he went to Kusumapura for advanced studies and that he lived there for some time.
[4]
Both Hinduand Buddhist tradition, as well asBhskara I(CE 629), identifyKusumapura asP
aliputra, modernPatna.
[1]
A verse mentions thatAryabhata was the head of an institution (
kulapa
) at Kusumapura, and, because the university of  Nalandawas in Pataliputra at the time and hadan astronomical observatory, it is speculated that Aryabhata might have been the head of the Nalanda university as well.
[1]
Aryabhata is also
 
reputed to have set up an observatory at the Sun temple inTaregana,Bihar.
[5]
 
[edi
t]
Ke
rala
 
hyp
o
th
esis
It has also been suggested that
amaka
(Sanskrit for "stone") might bethe region in Kerala that is now known as Ko
u

allr, based on the belief that it was earlier known as Ko
um-Kal-l-r ("city of hardstones"); however, old records show that the city was actually Ko
um-kol-r ("city of strict governance").
[1]
It is also claimed that the fact thatseveral commentaries on the Aryabhatiya have come from Keralasuggest that it was Aryabhata's main place of life and activity. ButK. V.Sarma, the authority on Kerala's astronomical tradition,
[6]
disagrees andcites many commentaries that have come from outside Kerala and theAryasiddhanta's being completely unknown in Kerala.
[1]
In recent (2007) papers, K. Chandra Hari uses a discrepancy in Aryabhata's astronomicalvalues to deduce that he carried out his calculations from a place inKerala at the same meridian as Ujjayini, possibly Chamravattam(10°N51, 75°E45) in centralKerala. He further hypothesizes thatAsmaka was the Jain country surroundingShravanabelagola, taking itsname from the stone monoliths there.
[6][7][8]
 Aryabhata mentions "Lanka" on several occasions in the Aryabhatiya, but his "Lanka" is an abstraction, standing for a point on the equator atthe same longitude as hisUjjayini.
[9
 
P
r
of.
An
i
m
es
h
C
hakrav
o
rty
 

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