Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Lady in Grey Ghost

Lady in Grey Ghost

Ratings: (0)|Views: 3 |Likes:
Published by draculavanhelsing
Melbourne Argus 1951 (July 13)
Melbourne Argus 1951 (July 13)

More info:

Published by: draculavanhelsing on Jun 26, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/23/2010

pdf

text

original

THELADYINGREY
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848-1954), Friday 13 July 1951, page 2
National Library of Australia
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23055547
IP^IfcW;.">1
£..*»«*"
;#»¿
f«-J
DO
YOU
BELIEVE
INGHOSTS?
Mr.GeorgeArden
swung
intothe
officesoftheMel-
bourne
"Gazette"
THIS
isthefirstofa'seriesof
trueAustralianghoststoriesby
GORDON
WILLIAMS.
Thefacts
are
¿rue
-
takenfromrecordsofthe
happeningsreported.
The
storiesare
treatedinfictional
form,butnothingdepartsfromtherecord
except,hereandthere,aname
whichmay
beintroduced
togivethenarration
continuity....Allhavetheirplacein the
literatureofthesupernormalin Australia..
."Buttheydosaythatpeople^^^3>^^B
passingthatcemeteryafterdarkhaveseen
^^^l"
aGreyWoman
pointingdowntowards theearth
..
,
feelingthotoilwas
wellwiththeworld.
ATtheImperialthey
hadbeenpleasedto
comment
wellupon
hi«
latesteditorial,
and
to

declarethatithadstolen theglisterfromtheeffort ofhisrival,who

ful-
minatedsoviciously,but
so,so
ineffectively,inthe
"Patriot."
Itwas
goodtobean editor,
goodto beamonarch
of this
strangekingdom
ofblack
inkand whitepaper,goodto
be
a
masterofwords,goodto
be
a
masterofwords,goodto
feelthatthefate oftheColony
mightwellbedecided
bywhat
hethoughtnext,expressednext.
Hemarched
throughtheouter
office,
confounding
the
night
gloom,and
the
poor
lighting,
nodded
generously
toward
old
Cripps,who
was
still
seated
on
hishighstoolduringhisinter
minable
accounts,andpassed into
the
passageway
leadingtohis
room-t-his
sacred
room.
Hewhistledlightlyafewbars
of"TheGirl ILeftBehind
Me,"
thenremembered
hisdignityand
coughed,inself-admonition.
Then
helaid hishandupon
thedoorknobof hisoffice,turned
the knob
...
"Excuse
me,please,Mr.Arden;
Don'tgoInthereJustnow.
She's
bininthereagain,
sir,areading
sir,areading
ofyourlettersandsplashingthe
?
inkaboutsomethingcruel,tir."
"JupiterBrown,
what
are
you
raving
about,
this
time?
If
you've
been
filling
yourself
with,that
villainous
stuffthey
sellyouat the tavernagain,
I'll
haveyourJoboutofyou-even
Ifyou
are
theoldestcompositor
on
thisnewspaper.
Come,
man.
What's
thisnonsense?"
"She'sbinin thereagain,
sir.
That
woman.
'Orriblelooking
oldthing
.
.
.
'Ooked
nose
on
her,
sir;tongrobes.
Rare banshee,
that'swhatshelookslike,though
ImustsayI have
never
heard of
herwailing.
No,sir,shedon't
wail
.
.
.
Butshe'sa banshee
all
right
.
.
.
And shereadsyourlet-
ters,sir,and pulls 'em aboutyour
tableand-"
-
"Jupiter,ifyouhave
beenIn
theresneaking
a

glanceatmy
correspondence,Ishallhaveyou
charged.

.
..
Banshee!
Itistime
we
either sacked
you-but
little
goodthatwould
doyoursoul
hadyoushut away,
or
forbade
youthetaverns,bythepowerof
thelaw."
.
LAUGH
ifyou
like,sir,
butme
and
Tom
Jenks
have
seen
her
now
more
thanonce,and sheget« tofum-
blingaround
yourdeskaslarge
as
life.
'Orrible
old
thing.
I
didthink,sir,shewas
somestray
wench
whomighthave blundered
in,like,buttherewas
thattime
I triedtostop'er,andmy
'and
went
throughher.
.
.
.
She'sa
banshee,Mr.Arden,andmake
no
mistake."
Arden
walked
intohisoffice,
improvedthelight,and
glanced
at histable.
Itwas
disordered.
And
henever
leftitso.
There
were
letterslyingopen
(hiscorrespondence
was
always
filedneatlyaway-well, neatlyas
may
be,anyway)
inhis drawer.
There
was
a
strangesmell
abouttheplace-not
thepun-
gencyofink,not themusty heavi-
ness
ofdampwood,¡nota
com«
pound
cftheinvadingsmellsof
the
streets,
but
something
like
what
was
it,
again?
.'Got
_,
whiff
ofbrimstone,
sir,"saidJupiter.
"Exactly,"
saidArden."That's
it.
Brimst-hey,what
nonsense
isthis?
Brimstone?
Out
of
here,Brown,
ano
backtoyour
work
.
.
.
and
no
more
non-
work
.
.
.
and
no
more
non-
sense
about
banshees
.
.
.
butt
sendCartertome.
I'llfindout
who's
been
tampering
with
my
correspondence,and
spillingink
onmydesk.
I'll
.
.
,"
"That
you
won't,
sir,"
mut-
teredJupiter,as
hemoved
away.
"That
you
won't.
Mark
my
words,sheisn'tofthisworld,sir,
being
a
banshee,
or
maybe
worse."
v
"Banshee
or
bandit,
I'll
find
cut," shouted
Arden.
But
Arden
never
did discover
who
hisvisitorwas-a
nocturnal
prowlerdressedIngrey,'flowing
robes,
ugly(accordingtothe
storiesofthe
two
peoplewho
saw-or
reportedthattheysaw
her
most
frequently),
and
at
timesmenacing.
...
"Ibelieveshe
issomebodythey
haveplunderedoutofthegrave-
yard,"saidBrown
one
nightto~
a
friend,who
"had
seen
some
pretty'orriblethings'imselfin'is
time,believeyoume."
"Isee
herprettyoften.
.
And shelooksveryugly,although
itmay
bebecauseherfaceal-
ways
lookstwistedupas
ifshe's
inpain,andcrying,like.
.
"TSEE
hertheothernight,
Xwhen
I
am
wandering
around
theofficewhen
I
shouldha'binhome,
She
goes
rightpastme,andshe couldn't
have
been
abletosee
inthe
dark.
She
struck)
a
light,she
did,notwithamatchbox
likeI've
got hereinmy
hand,butby
dippingthetopofaluciferina
bottle
.
.
.
bottlefullofacid,
maybe.
"Then
shegoesintoMr. Ar-

den'?room,and I'mgameenough
tofollowher.Rummagingamong
hisletters,shewas,

findingher-
selfpaper,pickingupapenand
writing
...
.
"But
Idon'thearofanywrit-
ingleftbehindher.Atleast,no
one
findsanything.Onlythe
tumbledaboutletters.
"Maybe,
I think,she
has
a
crush
on

Mr.Arden,andwants
toseewho'swritingtohim.But
then,Isaytomyself,'Jupiter,

ghostsdon'thave
loveaffair
with
humans.
Itain'tinthe
orderoftyature.'
"80when
young
Tommy
gets
tosether,whenIam
notthere,
Isay, 'Ah,that will bea
lesson
to them
who
think I havebeen
spendingtoomuch
time in the
Imperial.'
Tommy
don't
drink
Imperial.'
Tommy
don't
drink
-aad
hedoesn'tgetghostsout
ofaglass.
Nomore
doI.
"Mark
my
words,Itellyou
sheisone
whose
bodyhasbeen
snatched
out
ofthecemetery,
andsheistryingtowrite tothe
papersaboutit."
"Never
heard
ofa
ghostwant-
ingtowritea lettertoaneditor."
saidhiscrony,Michael.
"But
It'sfunnyyou
should
say
she
might
have
been
stole from
a
cemetery.They
.
say
old
Mrs.
Carrltch
was
'
stolenaway.
"In
the
old
times,
a
lotof
fellers
was
stolen
out
of
cemeteries.
"Look at what
Marker,themechanic,found.
He
'adtogo andrepairthevaultof
oldMr.and Mrs.Á.Thewet had
gottothefoundations.Andwhen
heopeneditup-why,
therewas
Mrs.A.'scoffinlid
all
askew,
and.the
coffinwas
empty.
.
.
,
"Tlf'ARKER'mostdropped.
UTAHedidn'tknowwhat
to
do.Sohejustshoved
the
lidback
without
letting
on
to
Smlthle
who
was
laboringfor
him.
And
fordaysafterhe
is
worriedabout
thisbody-snatch-
ing,and hedcesn'tknow
whether
totellthepolicebecause
Ifany-
thingvaluablehasbeenpinched
fromthccoffinhethinksmaybehe
willbeblamed.
...
Heasksme
about
it,and
Isaytohim,'Let
sleepingdogs
lie,
Marker,whatIs
done
isdone
and
can'tbeun-
done.'
"Course,Iwas
a
young
'un
then,anddon'ttakemuch
notice
ofspectresandhauntsandthings
.
.
.
Buttheydosaythatpeople
passingthatcemeteryafterdark
haveseen
aGreyWoman
point-
ingdown
toward
the earthnear
thevault.
.
.
."
"That
was
a
goodtime
ago,
though,"'sighedBrown.
"Inever
didtakemuch
stockincemetery
stealing,inspiteofMr.Arden's
bansheelady.
Who
would
want
thebodies?
Not
liketheold
daysintheOld
Countrywhen
Burke
andthat otherfellowused
tosell dead
'uns tothestudent
doctorsand
apothecaries.
"We
didn'thave
a
University
forstudentstowant
bodiesat
then,andfromwhat
I hearthe
doctorsdidn'tbothermuch
about
studyinganatomy.
"Ihave
alwaysthoughtmy-
"Ihave
alwaysthoughtmy-
self,"saidaquietman
standing
by,
"that
those
resurrectionist
storieswere
begunbyan
oldla?
who
came
outherefor Justsuch
acrime.
"Still,there'sbeen
a
whisper
thatone
or
twobodieshavedis-
appeared-practitioners
wanted
todopost-mortem
studieswith-
outapprisingthe
relatives
or
riskingthehurt
of theirvery
proper
feelings."
.
"¥'VE
gotitinmy
bones
J.thatMr.Arden'sladyIs
one
ofthem,"saidBrown.
"Couldbe.But believeyoume
and
Tommy-and
maybe
others
who
have
gone
round
that
Gazette
officelookingscared,but
who
would
never
saywhy-that
banshee,
or
whatever
she
is,
is
there.
Iknow."
.
.
*
Andthatisareconstruc-
tionofone
ofMelbourne's
firstrecordedhauntings.
Was
thereaGreyWoman?
WasBrown inspiredmerelyby
thespirits
hetookattheIm-
perial?
.was
Tommy
an
unreliablewit-
ness?
Certainly,thereseems,in what-
ever
was
recorded
of the "visita-
tion,"no
purpose
inthe haunt
ings.
.
.
.
There
was
quiteagood
deal
of
persuasive
evidence,
theugh-and
why
(asItwas
re-
lated)didMr.Arden
race
furi-
ouslyfrom
hisofficeone
night,
faceblanched,eyesstaring?
He
may
have
been
ina
fury
quitepropertoeditors.
.
.
..
Hemay
have
-
butconjecture
would
beimproper.
Ardcm's
OreyLadywas
spoken
cfmuch,butopinion
was
very
sharplydivided.
Unfortunately,Brown's
visits
totheImperialseem
tohaveob-
scured
theissue,
and
there
was
littleor
no
recorded
investiga-
tion.
.
.
.
But
itianot
so
many
years
agothat
a
man
and
a
woman
passingbytheUnion
Bank,in
Collins
Street,
near
which
the
Gazetteofficeonce
stood,saw
a
wmie,
jointly
luminousiht«'
elad inflowingdraperiei-cnold,s
oldwoman,
withalined/ace and
a/tootednoie;shewaveredand)
vanished
as
theylooked
...
t
A trickofthemist?.,Oflight??
Perhaps.
...
(
ButJupiterBrown
wouldnever'
agree.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->