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Table Of Contents

Introduction
Hekhalot and Merkavah Mysticism
Mystical Journeys in Mythological Language
Notes
Bibliography
Index of Passages Discussed
Index of Authors
General Index
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Beholders of Divine Secrets, Mysticism and Myth in the Hekhalot and Merkavah Literature

Beholders of Divine Secrets, Mysticism and Myth in the Hekhalot and Merkavah Literature

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Published by urbanom
Rabbi Akiva said:
Who is able to contemplate the seven palaces
and behold the heaven of heavens
and see the chambers of chambers
and say: “I saw the chamber of YH?”
—Ma’aseh Merkavah, Synopse, 554.
This question is posed by Rabbi Akiva, a central figure of the Hekhalot
and Merkavah literature of late antiquity. In it we find mentioned
several claims and aspects which distinguish the mysticism found in
this literature. We hear of “contemplation,” “ascent to heaven,” and
“vision of divine palaces.” We learn that a human being can cross
traditional boundaries between the phenomenological and the transcendent
realms, make a contemplative ascent to heaven, behold the
chambers of God in a personal manner, and communicate these experiences
and visions to others. We also encounter an enigma: Who is
this qualified person?
Rabbi Akiva said:
Who is able to contemplate the seven palaces
and behold the heaven of heavens
and see the chambers of chambers
and say: “I saw the chamber of YH?”
—Ma’aseh Merkavah, Synopse, 554.
This question is posed by Rabbi Akiva, a central figure of the Hekhalot
and Merkavah literature of late antiquity. In it we find mentioned
several claims and aspects which distinguish the mysticism found in
this literature. We hear of “contemplation,” “ascent to heaven,” and
“vision of divine palaces.” We learn that a human being can cross
traditional boundaries between the phenomenological and the transcendent
realms, make a contemplative ascent to heaven, behold the
chambers of God in a personal manner, and communicate these experiences
and visions to others. We also encounter an enigma: Who is
this qualified person?

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Published by: urbanom on Jun 26, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/31/2013

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