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Mark Twain on Copyright, § 3.52 in Testifying Before Congress, Remarks of Samuel Langhorne Clemens Before the Congressional Joint Committee on Patents, December, 1906

Mark Twain on Copyright, § 3.52 in Testifying Before Congress, Remarks of Samuel Langhorne Clemens Before the Congressional Joint Committee on Patents, December, 1906

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Published by TheCapitol.Net
From Testifying Before Congress, by William LaForge (TheCapitol.Net) ISBN 10: 1587331721, ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-172-5

There are moments in the history of congressional committee hearings in which someone larger than life has had the opportunity to testify and, moreover, to deliver a message to a committee that is both serious and humorous at once. One such occasion involved Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known as Mark Twain and widely considered to be the greatest humorist of 19th-century American literature, who contributed a major piece of humor in the context of his testimony before
a congressional hearing in 1906.

Assuming his public persona by notably wearing a white suit that became his signature uniform, the 71-year-old author appeared before the Congressional Joint Committee
on Patents to share his thoughts on a pending copyright bill.
Twain was the main and final witness of the hearing, which was held in the Congressional Reading Room of the Library of Congress. Before an unusually large crowd
for a congressional hearing, Twain expressed his strong support for copyright protection for authors, artists, and musicians. His testimony, part-serious, part-humorous, was considered to be very influential in the eventual development of copyright law.

For more information about this book, see www.TCNTwain.com
From Testifying Before Congress, by William LaForge (TheCapitol.Net) ISBN 10: 1587331721, ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-172-5

There are moments in the history of congressional committee hearings in which someone larger than life has had the opportunity to testify and, moreover, to deliver a message to a committee that is both serious and humorous at once. One such occasion involved Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known as Mark Twain and widely considered to be the greatest humorist of 19th-century American literature, who contributed a major piece of humor in the context of his testimony before
a congressional hearing in 1906.

Assuming his public persona by notably wearing a white suit that became his signature uniform, the 71-year-old author appeared before the Congressional Joint Committee
on Patents to share his thoughts on a pending copyright bill.
Twain was the main and final witness of the hearing, which was held in the Congressional Reading Room of the Library of Congress. Before an unusually large crowd
for a congressional hearing, Twain expressed his strong support for copyright protection for authors, artists, and musicians. His testimony, part-serious, part-humorous, was considered to be very influential in the eventual development of copyright law.

For more information about this book, see www.TCNTwain.com

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Published by: TheCapitol.Net on Jun 30, 2010
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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05/12/2014

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Testifying
Before
Congress
A Practical Guide to Preparing and DeliveringTestimony Before Congress and CongressionalHearings for Agencies, Associations, Corporations,Military, NGOs, and State and Local Officials
By William N.LaForge
 
For over 30 years, TheCapitol.Net and its predecessor, Congressional Quarterly ExecutiveConferences, have been training professionals from government, military, business, and NGOs onthe dynamics and operations of the legislative and executive branches and how to work with them.Our training and publications include congressional operations, legislative and budget process,communication and advocacy, media and public relations, research, business etiquette, and more.TheCapitol.Net is a non-partisan firm.Our publications and courses, written and taught by
current
Washington insiders who are allindependent subject matter experts, show how Washington works.™ Our products and servicescan be found on our web site at <
www.TheCapitol.Net
>. Additional copies of 
Testifying Before Congress
can be ordered from your favorite bookseller oronline: <
www.TestifyingBeforeCongress.com
>.Design and production by Zaccarine Design, Inc., Evanston, IL; 847-864-3994.The paper used in this publication exceeds the requirements of the American National Standardfor Information Sciences—Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials, ANSI Z39.48-1992.Copyright ©2010 By TheCapitol.Net, Inc.PO Box 25706 Alexandria, VA 22313-5706703-739-3790 Toll free: 1-877-228-5086<
www.TheCapitol.Net
> All Rights Reserved. Printed in the United States of America. v 1
Testifying Before Congress
Softcover: ISBN: 158733-163-2 Hardbound: ISBN: 158733-172-1ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-163-3 ISBN 13: 978-1-58733-172-5
 
§3.51Dissecting Written Witness Testimonyor Statements in a Nutshell—The Essential Methods for Buildingthe Case and Developing the Argument
(For more complete information, see § 3.40, Building the Case and Developing the Argument.)In a nutshell, the essential components of building the case and developing the ar-guments for congressional testimony or statements include:1) Committee Advocacy: Education, Persuasion, and Argumentation (§ 3.41);2) Explanation of Issues, Facts, and Remedies Sought (§ 3.42);3) Witness Standing and Credibility (§ 3.43);4) Importance of Succinct Position Outline (§ 3.44);5) Public Policy Rationale, Support, and Reasoning (§ 3.45);6) Framing the Issue (§ 3.46);7) Distinguishing from Opposition Position: Comparing,Contrasting, and Categorizing (§ 3.47); and8) “Playing” to the Committee Audience and Connectingto Members’ Interests (§ 3.48).
§3.52HITS: Humor in Testimony—Mark Twain
There are moments in the history of congressional committee hearings in which some-one larger than life has had the opportunity to testify and, moreover, to deliver a mes-sage to a committee that is both serious and humorous at once.One such occasion involved Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known as MarkTwain and widely considered to be the greatest humorist of 19th-century American lit-erature, who contributed a major piece of humor in the context of his testimony beforea congressional hearing in 1906. Assuming his public persona by notably wearing a white suit that became his sig-nature uniform, the 71-year-old author appeared before the Congressional Joint Com-mittee on Patents to share his thoughts on a pending copyright bill.Twain was the main and final witness of the hearing, which was held in the Con-gressional Reading Room of the Library of Congress. Before an unusually large crowdfor a congressional hearing, Twain expressed his strong support for copyright protec-tion for authors, artists, and musicians. His testimony, part-serious, part-humorous,was considered to be very influential in the eventual development of copyright law.
Preparation of Written Testimony
§3.52
TestifyingBeforeCongress.com
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The Trashy Novel Corp added this note
This is fitting in a time when everyone is listening to the State of the Union. Samuel Clemens testified on copyright law back in the good ol' days! Mark Twain on Copyright, § 3.52 in Testifying Before Congress, Remarks of Samuel Langhorne Clemens Before the Congressional Joint Committee on Patents, December, 1906 We've got a lot to thank Mark Twain for! Mostly his humor!
The Trashy Novel Corp added this note
Bravo!
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