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Guerrilla Warfare - Mao Tze Tung - 1941

Guerrilla Warfare - Mao Tze Tung - 1941

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Published by haraoi_conal
2708-9008 19/Lec/50mgm
THA:'lSLATOH'S NOTE

In July, 1941, the undeclared war between China and Japan will enter its fifth year. One of the most significant features of t~e strugGle has been the organization of the Chinese people for unlimi ted guerrilla lNarfare. The development of this war­ fare has followed the pattern laid out by Mao Tzu Tung and his collaborators in the pa.mphlet "Guerrilla. ',.arfare tl whic~l. ,'JaS published in 1937 and has been widely dis ributed in "Free China" at ten
2708-9008 19/Lec/50mgm
THA:'lSLATOH'S NOTE

In July, 1941, the undeclared war between China and Japan will enter its fifth year. One of the most significant features of t~e strugGle has been the organization of the Chinese people for unlimi ted guerrilla lNarfare. The development of this war­ fare has followed the pattern laid out by Mao Tzu Tung and his collaborators in the pa.mphlet "Guerrilla. ',.arfare tl whic~l. ,'JaS published in 1937 and has been widely dis ributed in "Free China" at ten

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Published by: haraoi_conal on Jul 01, 2010
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01/04/2013

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2708-9008
19/Lec/50mgm
THA:'lSLATOH'S
NOTE
In
July,
1941,
the
undeclared
war
between
China
and
Japan
will enter
its
fifth
year.
One
of the
most
significant
features
of
t ~ e
 
strugGle
has been
the
organization
of
the
Chinese
people
for
unlimited
guerrilla
lNarfare.
The
development
of
this
war
fare
has
followed
the
pattern laid
out
by
Mao
Tzu
Tung
and
his
collaborators
in
the
pa.mphlet
"Guerrilla.
',.arfare
tl
w h i c ~ l .
 
,'JaS
published
in
1937
and
has
been
widely
dis
ributed
in
"Free
China"
at
ten cents
a
copy.
'ao
Tzu
Tung,
a
memLer'of
the
Chinese
Communist
party
ane:.
former
political
comrnissar
of the
Fourth
Red Army,
ts
no
novice
in
the
art
of
war.
Actual
battle
experiencewith
both
reGular
and
guerrilla
troops
has
qualified
him
as an
expert.
This
I
believe
the
biographical
sketch
extracted
fromEdgarSnow's
":'1ed
Star
Over
China
ll
will
indicate.
T ~ e
 
influence
of
the
ancient
~ i l i t a r y
 
philosophor
Sun Tzu
on
I'Eao' s
'nili
tary
thouSht
will
be
apparent
.to
those
who
have
read
"The Sook
of
·,:ar."
Sun
Tzu
wrote
that
speed,
surprise
and
d ~ c e p t i o n
 
were
the
prLnary
essentials
of
the
attack
and
his
succinct
advice
lfSheng
Tung,
Chi
Hsi"
(Distraction
in
the
T:l;ast"
3trike
in
the
~ e s t )
 
is
no
less
valid
today
than
it
was when
he
\frote
it
twenty
four
hundred
years
ago.
The
tactics
of
Sun
Tzu
are
inlarge
messure
the
tactics
of
China's
guerrillas
to-
oay.
:'10.0
says
that unlbli
ted
guerrilla
warfarewith
vas
t
time
and
space
factors establishes
a new
silitary
process.
This
seems
a
true
statement
as
there
are
no
other
historical
examples
of
guerrilla.
hostilities
as
thoroughly
organized
from
the
mili-
tary,
political,
and economic
point
of
view
as
those
in
C£llna.
','e
in
the
Harine
Corps have
as
yet
encountered
nothing
but
relatively
primitive
and
strictly
li;ilited
guerrilla
war.
Thus
1}
l
rhat
:'Tao
has
wri
tten
of
this
new
type
of
guerrilla
war
:may
be
of
interest
to us.
I
have
tried
topresent
the
author's
ideas
accurately,
but
as
the
Chinese
language
is
not
a
pcrticularly
suitable
~ e d i Q 1 1
 
for
the
expression
of
technical
thought
the
translation
of
some
of the
modern
idioms
not
yet
to
be
found
in
available
dictionaries
is
probally
arguable.
I
can
not
vouch
for
the
accuracy
of
the
retranslated
quotations.
I
have
taken
the
liberty
to
delete
froll
the
translation
matter
which
wa.s
purely
repetitious.
i
 
2708-9008
19!Dec!50mgm
l'HAC
TZU
TUNG
Eao
Tzu
Tungwas
born
on
a
farm
in
Hunan
Provinco
in
1893.
~ e
 
beganworking
in
the
fields
at
the
age
of
six.
From
his
eighth
to
thirteenth
year
he
attended
a
local
primary schoolduring the
daytime
ane worked
in
the
early
mornings
and
at
night
on
the
farm.
His
father
was
a
strict
&isciplinarian
and
~ \ : a o
 
developed.
rebellioushabits
in
his
early
youth.
At
the
ase
of
thirteen,
in
a
fight
with
his
father
I-.1ao
lenrnec1
that,
"';hen
I
defended
my
rights
\I'li
th
open
rebellion
my
father
relented,
but
when
I
remained
meek
and
sabmissive
he
only cursod
and
beat
111e
the
:ilore."
Shortly
after
this
battle
he
gained
his
father's
consent
to
return
to
school.
'rhis
time
he
studied
lI·;estel"n
Learning
l'
including
g e o ~ r a p h y ,
 
natural
sciences,
and
history.
In
1911
he
served
six
months
in
the
Revolutionary
Army.The
succeeding
six
years
were
spent
in
the
provincial
library
of
Hunan
and
at
the
;Iunan Normal
Schoo
1.
~ ; 1 a o
 
became
an
ardentphysical
culturist
and
whenever
opportunity
afforded,
took
long
walking
tours
and
hardened
himself
physically
by swimJing
in the
winter, sleeping in
the
snow, and
nalking
in
the
rain.
It
was
while
he
was
an
assistant librarian at
the
7eiping
lJational
Univer.3ity
that
he
b e c a ~ ' n e
 
a
convert
to
the
):arxist
philosophy,
and
from
this
time
on
he
was
constantly active
in
the
Chinese
Corrmunist
Party.In
1927
the
split
occurred
between
the
~ u o m i n t a n g
 
led
by
Chiang Kai
Shek and
the
Commun-
ist
Party.
From
1927
to
1928
Mao
held
t o ~ e t h e r
 
those
elements
of
the
arny
that
were
cOll1J11.mistic
.
During
that
year the
army
increased
in
size
and
in
the
autumn
of
1928
was
organized
asthe
Fourth
Army
under'
the
COliL'Tl8.nd
of
Chu
Teh.
118.0
becmne
political
commissar.
In
the
meantime,
a
price
had
been
put
on
his
head
by
tho
Kuomintang,
his
properties
confiscated,
and
his
wife
and
youneor
sister
arrested
and
executed
e
From
1931
to
1934
C h i a n ~
 
undertook
the
five
extermination
,-
campaigns
and
in
t ~ e
 
latter
year
the
Red Army
was
forced
to
move
from
south
China
to
the
n o r t h w e s t ~
 
This
~ o v e m e n t ,
 
now
famous
as
the
"Long
I1arch,ll
terminated
in
Shensi
in
October,
1935.
From
the
fall
of
1935
to the
spring
of
1937
the
Ded
Government
led
by
Mao
consolidated
its
position
in
the
north-
west.
ii

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