Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Buy Now $20.00
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
6Activity
P. 1
Crossing: A Memoir

Crossing: A Memoir

Ratings:

3.63

(8)
|Views: 2,685|Likes:
Published by UChicagoPress
We have read the stories of those who have "crossed" lines of race and class and culture. But few have written of crossing—completely and entirely—the gender line. Crossing is the story of Deirdre McCloskey (formerly Donald), once a golden boy of conservative economics and a child of 1950s and 1960s privilege, and her dramatic and poignant journey to becoming a woman. McCloskey's account of her painstaking efforts to learn to "be a woman" unearth fundamental questions about gender and identity, and hatreds and anxieties, revealing surprising answers.
We have read the stories of those who have "crossed" lines of race and class and culture. But few have written of crossing—completely and entirely—the gender line. Crossing is the story of Deirdre McCloskey (formerly Donald), once a golden boy of conservative economics and a child of 1950s and 1960s privilege, and her dramatic and poignant journey to becoming a woman. McCloskey's account of her painstaking efforts to learn to "be a woman" unearth fundamental questions about gender and identity, and hatreds and anxieties, revealing surprising answers.

More info:

Publish date: Mar 15, 2010
Added to Scribd: Jul 01, 2010
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780226556727
List Price: $20.00 Buy Now

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Buy the full version from:Amazon
See more
See less

07/02/2014

308

9780226556727

$20.00

USD

You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 7 to 30 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 37 to 46 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 53 to 101 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 108 to 259 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 266 to 308 are not shown in this preview.

Activity (6)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
publishers2weekly reviewed this
Transsexuality has fascinated mainstream readers since 1953, when former U.S. serviceman George Jorgensen went to Sweden and, to banner headlines, returned as Christine. Since then, there has been a string of notable memoirs of gender crossing, including Geoff Brown's sincere I Want What I Want (1966), Jan Morris's meditative Conundrum (1974) and Holly Woodlawn's campy A Low Life in High Heels (1994). McCloskey's own odyssey from Donald to Deirdre is closest to noted journalist Morris's, in that it charts the life change of a highly regarded public figureÄMcCloskey is a world-famous conservative economistÄwho finds fulfillment as a woman after four decades of living as a man. McCloskey forthrightly describes her upper-middle-class youth in Boston, her early and lifelong interest in cross-dressing, her education and eventual success as an academic and her marriage and children. In her late 40s, McCloskey decided that she was not simply a heterosexual cross-dresser but a transsexual and decided to undergo a series of operations to become an anatomical woman. Her memoir effectively details the pain involved: a bitter divorce, insurance companies' refusal to cover surgeries and her sister's repeated attempts to block the process legally. McCloskey's proclivity to jump around in time, her tendency to disrupt the flow of her story with social and political digressions and the constant placing of additional thoughts and ideas in bold text throughout the narrative distract from her storyÄbut her courage nevertheless shines through. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

1999-10-04, Publishers Weekly
localcharacter_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
In 1995, economics professor Donald McCloskey's second child had gone off to college, and in the empty nest he indulged a little bit more in a habit of decades: cross-dressing. But with the new freedom he found it wasn't just an isolated habit and he wanted to take it further and further, become more and more a woman: by the end of the year he'd changed his name to Deirdre and was living full-time as a woman, and by summer of 1996 Deirdre had gone to Australia for The Operation. His wife had divorced her (he was already a she), his daughter wouldn't talk to her—but in his profession and elsewhere, Deirdre found new support and friends.

Deirdre McCloskey doesn't want to get in your face about gender roles; she just wants to tell what it's like to want to become a woman, and then to actually do it. She tells the book in the third person, giving clear attribution to Donald's thoughts and experiences, Deirdre's, and those of "Dee" (the interim stage). It's a very quickly written book—it came out in 1999, less than two years after the last events it recounts—but that comes across not as sloppiness so much as looseness and lightness in the structure and a clear sense that there was no editing or censoring of what's on the page. This is what Deirdre thinks, period. As Deirdre the economist might say: either you find it of value, or you don't.

She's thrilled about the new social avenues and acknowledgements open to her, less thrilled about learning makeup and worrying about passing. She's grateful for the easy acceptance of her sex change in academic circles, distraught over her family's rejection (including twice being arrested and committed for psychiatric evaluation, at her sister's instigation). It's hard not to read this book as an action thriller, where the protagonist's goal is simply to make the crossing safely from hero to heroine. Several times, in fact, McCloskey brings up immigrants and others who managed "crossings" which she sees as more courageous—and, going by this example, changing sex really shouldn't be that big a deal.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
carlosufrj2 liked this
kenelectron03 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->