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Investigatory Class

Investigatory Class

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Published by roel06

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Published by: roel06 on Jul 04, 2010
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Cogon Grass Cardboard Food Packaging
Abstract
 The feasibility of cogon grass (Imperata cylindrica) as a substitute for cardboard food packaging wasstudied in this research project. The cogon grass was cut, boiled, and crushed in order to get the pulp.The pulp was then subjected to five different treatments before it was made into a card board likematerial. The amount of resin and other additives was kept constant while the amount of starch wasvaried in every treatment.
Introduction
 Nonbiodegradable waste is a major concern everywhere in the world. The bulk of the world¶s wasteconsists of the hard-to-break-down products, such as styrofoam. Styrofoam is commonly used as foodcontainers in fast food restaurants. Because it cannot be recycled, this particular waste contributes largelyto the world¶s increasing garbage problem.To lessen this environmental problem, one logical solution is to use biodegradable materials or recyclableones. Paper is being reconsidered and encouraged for use. This material can be recycled over and over again. However, trees still need to be cut for paper production. This spells trouble for the already depletedforests. Because of this, the researchers thought of another alternative. This alternative uses cogon grassfor making the pulp and the paper. Cogon grass is found abundantly in many places and is sometimesconsidered a nuisance.
M
aterials and
M
ethods
 
R
esults and Discussion
 
Selected
R
eferences
 Lampe, Klaus. Making Paper from Rice Straw. Los Baños, Laguna: International Rice Research Institute,1991.McGraw-Hill Science and Technology Encyclopedia. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1981.Rekka, M.M. et al., Blending Rice Straw Pulp with Some Egyptian Flora. Research and Industry 30 (2),1985.Further clarification of the procedures and results should be directed to the researchers and adviser.
R
esearchers
 Vanessa GabietaHazel PascualJericho Leo ReyesCecily Claire TiuMildred Uy
Adviser 
 Ms. Juanita CruzPhilippine Science High SchoolQuezon City
Source:Bato Balanifor Science and Technology Vol. 24 NO. 1 SY 2004-2005. Incooperation withDepartment of Science and Technology.
 
U
sed Cooking Oil as an Additive Component of Candle
Abstract
 The study aims to produce a low-priced, high-quality candle by using used cooking oil as a major component. The following candle compositions were used: 100 percent paraffin wax; 90 percent paraffinand 10 percent oil; 80 percent paraffin and 20 percent oil; 70 percent paraffin and 30 percent oil; 60percent paraffin and 40 percent oil; 50 percent paraffin and 50 percent oil. The firmness, texture, and lightintensity of the candles were tested and compared.Results of the tests showed that the candle made from 100 percent paraffin wax had the lowest meltingrate, lowest amount of melted candle, and a light intensity of 100 candelas (cd). The 90:10 preparationhad the next lowest melting rate and amount of melted candle. The other preparations ranked accordingto the proportion of used cooking oil in the candle, with the 50:50 preparation performing leastcomparably with the 100 percent paraffin wax candle.
Introduction
 Today, candles are made not only for lighting purposes but for many other uses such as home décor,novelty collections, as fixtures for big occasions (weddings, baptismals, etc.), and as scented varieties for aromatherapy. Candles are made from different types of waxes and oils.Cooking oil is a major kitchen item in Filipino households. It is also used substantially in fast-food outlets,where it is used in different stages of food preparations. Ordinarily, used cooking oil is discarded. Thiswaste oil pollutes and clogs canals and sewerage systems.
M
aterials and
M
ethods
 
R
esults and Discussion
 
Selected
R
eferences
 The Feasibility of Cocos nucifera Oil as an Additive for Quality Candles. Bato Balani Volume 15 Issue 1,Junior. pp. 16-18. Candles, Waxes, Oils. Microsoft Encarta 2004Further clarification of the procedures and results should be directed to the researchers and adviser.
R
esearchers
 Lauriedette Ann D. ConcepcionJoane F. Libranda Anna Carmela R. Santiago
Adviser 
 Mrs. Racquel C. DiazTalavera National High School
Source: BatoBalani for Science and Technology Vol. 26 NO. 3 SY 2006-2007. Incooperation withDOST.

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