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Oil Spill Risk Assessment

Oil Spill Risk Assessment

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Published by: Protect Florida's Beaches on Jul 06, 2010
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09/04/2010

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OIL
SPLL
RISK
ASSESSMENT
TASK
FORCE
REPORT
BY
STATE
OF
FLORIDA
AND
U.S.
DEPARTMENTOF
THE
INTERIOR
MINERAI.SMANAGEMENT
SERVICE
OCTOBER
1989
 
INTRODUCTTON
On
June L6, 1988,the Secretaryof the Interior
and
StateofFlorida covernor
Bob
Martinez
agreed
tothe formationoftwo taskforces to analyze issues concerning exploratorydrillingforoil
anrl craq crn theOUtef Continenfal Shel f /OCs)qnrrl-hnf260 nofth
*" /rvsu^r
latitude off
southwest
Florida.
The
DrilIing
Impact
Assessment
Task
Force
(DIATF)wasasked
to
analyze
allpotential
impactsof
exploratory
drilling
operationson south
Ftorida coastal
and
marine
resources.
The
Oi1
Spill
Risk
Assessment
Task
Force
(TF),
from
which
this report
has
been
prepared,
was
asked
to
analyze
the
potentialfor oiI spillsoccurring
from
explcratory
dril1:-ng
an1- irr.i.l-io<.iha aw.iqi-'i66 6lrrain=IF^-fr^rrhi(1andvs!vtrurEo, ur-r--YSlUOlUUgOIIUYIqPTI!U allu
meteorological information,the
methods
available to
model the
fate
and
transport of anoil spillshould
one
occur,
and the
:nethods
to
reduce
risksfroman oil spi}l. Thisreportis
based
on
these
analyses.
Tha rrn: Iq
q..t.rrrr.f
rrro and rtrsnons
i
h'i
.l
i
t
j
es Of the TFwef
e
outli-ned
in a
Terms
of
Cooperative
Agreement
(see
Appendix A).
The
general
charge
to the
TF was
to
review
and
try to
reach
a
consensus
on
thelevel of
information
necessaryand
the
approach
used
to
assess
the risks of oil spillsfor
exploratory
dril-ling
south
of
260
north latitude inthe
eastern
Gulfof
Mexico.
This
taskforce
and
reportdeal strictlywith
exploratory
drillingactivities.
There
was
noattempt
to
specifica-1Iy
address
developmenf.
and
production
activitiesin this
area
of
the
OCS.
Therefore,
many
of the
assumptions
made
while
developing
thisreport,
dswell-
as
assumptions
made
in
conjunction
with
theDIATF,
willnot
apply
to
OCS
oil
and
gas
development
and
production,
should
they
occur.
The TF acknor*ledges
thatrisks
(number
and volume
ofpotentialspills)
associatedtqith
developmentand
production
are
greater
thanthoseassociatedwithexploration.
GoaIs
The
goals
ofthe taskforce, outlined in the
CooperativeAgreement,
were
to
provide
the
Secretary
of theTnterior
and theGovernor
of Floridawith
an
estimate
of oil-spi1lrisks to the
r:
environmental resources
ofthe
South
Florida area; to
provide
an
additional
forum
for
addressing
the
irrformatj"on
needs
and
technical
issues
concerning
potentiatoil-spiltrisks
from
exploratory
drilling off
southwest
Fiorida;totry to
reach
a
consensus
on
a
method
for oil spill risk
assessnent
and
measures
available
t.o
mitl.gate
risk;
and
to
advise
the
Secretary
of
the
fnterior
and
the
Governor
ofFlorida
on
issues
related to
oi1-
spill risks.
 
Section
3
RESULTS
OF
OIL
SPILL
RISK
ASSESS}IENT
ilODELING
The
resultsofthe
27
yearsimulation
and
the
'rwith
eddy
currents"
sj-mulation
havebeen
reported
in thetables
in
Appendices
c
and
D,respectively.
These
are
sulnmary
tables
which
report the
freguency
and
time
of contact
from
hypotheticalspiIlsto
environmentalresources
and
coastal boundaries.
The
tables
havebeen
prepared
to
present
results
as
a function of
season/
and
time, i.e.,3,10,
and 30 days
within the lifeof
each
traJ
eccory.
These
tables
canbe
used
to
show
the
freguency
of contact,
inpercent
(the
number
of
contacts
to a
resource
divided
by
the
number
of launches).In additionthetables
can
be
used
to
show
the shortesttimeit
tooka
hypothetical-
spill to
contact
a
particularresource.
These
data
arealso
reported
for
each
Iaunch
point,
each season,and
annually.
The
simulations
can
be
used
to
answer
questions
about
therisk
to
the
study
area
from
oCS
exploratory
operations.
Given the
i.nformation about
the
conponents
of
each
simulation
and the
formatofthetab1es,thesesimu1ationsshouldanSwermany
guestions
posed
by
the reviewer. In the
i-nterest
of
summarizLng
theresul-ts,this
section
will
pose
questions
and ans!/er
therir
based
on
the results of the simulations.This isnot
meant
toimply
that
these
are
theonlyor
most
importantquestions
orthatthe
answers
areexhaustive.
The
goalis to illustratethe
use
of
the
simulation
and
nresent
some
of the
information
contained
within.
USING
THE
TABLES
Tables
in
Appendix
C
summarize
the
frequency
and
time of
contact
of
hypothetj-cal
spi11s
to
environmentalresources
or
land
segments
for the
27
year
simul-ations.
Frequencies
arein
percent
(i.e.,the
number
of
times
thata
resource
was
contacteddividedby
the total
number
of
launches)
and
aregiven
for
3-,,
l0-,
and
3O-day
periods.
These
tables
present
modeling
results
from
the
fu1I
27-year
windrecord over
all
seasons
(annual)
or
from
the
27
years
of thespecific
seasonal
winds
as
indicated
(vrinter,
spring,
sunmer
or fa1l).
Results
are also
summarized
in
both
annual"
andseasonal
tabLes
for
each
of the four individual
l-aunch
points.
In addition to the
frequency
of
contact
to
resources,
the
tables
also
show
theshortest
time
thatit
took a
hypotheticalspill
to
contacta
particularresource.
Time
to first contact
(shown
in
days
and
hours) is
presented
for
annual
andseasonal
results
and
for
each
individual
launch
point.

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