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Logic Statistical Probability and Modern Science

Logic Statistical Probability and Modern Science

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Published by Anthony Fejfar
This Article asserts that when logical premises are factually valid, then the conclusions of logic, are both logically, and scientifically, valid.
This Article asserts that when logical premises are factually valid, then the conclusions of logic, are both logically, and scientifically, valid.

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: Anthony Fejfar on Jul 07, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/27/2010

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Logic, Statistical Probability, and Modern ScienceByAnthony J. Fejfar, B.A., J.D., Esq., Coif ©Copyright 2010 by Anthony J. Fejfar In Modern Times, many people seem to be unfamiliar with Logic. In the Ancientand Medeival World, logic was seen to produce absolute certainty. From a realist pointof view, however, it appears that logic, like everything and everyone else, in existence,has a probability levels which is 99.99999999999% valid, and, no higher. Now, thisraises the issue as to the validity of logic and its conclusions, from the point of view of Modern Science. Modern Science teaches us that something is provisionally, or  probably, true, when there is a high statistical correlation between the theory utilized, andthe data which has been studied. For example, if a scientists were to study whether or not a desk really exists, he or she would find that there is a high statistical correlation of the existence of a desk, as defined in the material universe. In fact, the statisticalcorrelation of the existence of a desk, would probably be 99.999999999999% true or valid. In the case of logic, employing the idea of, real logic, it is clear that any logicallynecessary conclusion is itself 99.999999999999%, true, or statistically, valid. In other words, the conclusions of logic, flowing from a logical proof, have a high statisticalcorrelation of validity, or, truth, of 99.999999999999%. Now, as has beendemonstrated in an earlier article, it is possible that a logical contradiction could resultfrom a logic proof, which would negate the validity of that proof. This is why logiccannot be seen as providing absolute, logical certainty, but instead, only, highly probable,certainty. In such a case, what is needed is for the logician to develop a new logical rule

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