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U.S. Marine Corps Operations in IRAQ-2003–2006_HISTORY DIVISION UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS_2009

U.S. Marine Corps Operations in IRAQ-2003–2006_HISTORY DIVISION UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS_2009

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Published by manuals&manuals
This is a story about Marines and a tough mission: the Marines of I and II Marine Expeditionary Forces were deployed to Iraq during 2004–2006 and confronted a violent insurgency and a nation in chaos. Though the Marines came to fight—they did so admirably in al-Fallujah, ar-Ramadi, and other hot and dusty locales in al-Anbar Province—they also laid the foundation for a secure and stable Iraqi society.
Though security and stabilization seemed improbable if not impossible in al-Anbar Province, the apparent intractable insurgency was beaten with gritty determination that Marines have always brought to the fight. Besides using warfighting skills, the Marines also employed their expertise in civil affairs to help rebuild a nation in disarray.
The military occupation of al-Anbar Province required patience, perseverance, and fortitude. The cities and towns were damaged, inhabitants demoralized, and little remained of civil authority. Hopes remained high that the occupation would be short–lived and that the Iraqis would pick themselves up and rebuild. However, those hopes died hard on the harsh realities of post-invasion Iraq. As the Marines took up new and unplanned responsibilities, insurgent violence continued and increased, generated by the national disarray of all social institutions. For the I and II Marine Expeditionary Forces, nation building
and combat operations would proceed alongside one another for most of their service in Iraq.
A work of this kind necessarily depends on the help and advice of many people. The original concept
of assigning this volume to an independent historian came from discussions in 2005 between then-Lieutenant General James N. Mattis, commanding the Marine Corps Combat Development Center, and Major General Donald R. Gardner (Ret), President of Marine Corps University. Major General Gardner launched the project and arranged for my appointment as a research fellow of his institution during 2006–08.
Officers and enlisted Marines of Inspector-Instructor, 4th Landing Support Battalion, Ft. Lewis, Washington,
cheerfully provided office space and support for my research and writing. Their readiness to assist extended in many instances to their advice and valued explanations of current procedures and operational matters, including in several cases experiences in Iraq during the period treated by this work. In particular, I thank Lieutenant Colonel Richard C. Smith, Major Wesley E. Souza, Captain Gregory
J. Chester, Captain Christopher J. Murphy, Sergeant Major Thomas Glembin, and Staff Sergeant M.
E. Johnston.
The Marine Corps University Foundation and Marine Corps Heritage Foundation supported me with a combined fellowship in 2006–08, administered by Brigadier General Thomas V. Draude (Ret). The staff of the Archives Branch, Library of the Marine Corps, Gray Research Center at Quantico, principally Michael Miller, Director, and Dr. Jim Ginther, Manuscript Curator, facilitated my use of their document collection. Mr. Scott A. Allen assisted me in understanding some of the contributions of the Marine Corps Systems Command to the campaign under study.
At the Marine Corps History Division, I enjoyed the camaraderie and shared knowledge of Charles Neimeyer, Director; Colonel Richard Camp and Colonel Patricia D. Saint, Deputy Directors; Charles Melson,
Chief Historian; Fred Allison, Oral Historian; and Master Gunnery Sergeant Robert A. Yarnall, historian.
I received assistance from the Reference Section: Danny A. Crawford, Robert V. Aquilina, Lena
M. Kaljot, Annette Amerman, Kara Newcomer, and Shelia Boyd. This work benefited from the editorial review of Colonel Charles A. Jones and the efforts of Julie H. Robert, History Division intern. The Editing
and Design Section oversaw final production: Ken Williams, Greg Macheak, Wanda Renfrow, Vince Martinez, and Steve Hill, who was the primary designer on the project.
This is a story about Marines and a tough mission: the Marines of I and II Marine Expeditionary Forces were deployed to Iraq during 2004–2006 and confronted a violent insurgency and a nation in chaos. Though the Marines came to fight—they did so admirably in al-Fallujah, ar-Ramadi, and other hot and dusty locales in al-Anbar Province—they also laid the foundation for a secure and stable Iraqi society.
Though security and stabilization seemed improbable if not impossible in al-Anbar Province, the apparent intractable insurgency was beaten with gritty determination that Marines have always brought to the fight. Besides using warfighting skills, the Marines also employed their expertise in civil affairs to help rebuild a nation in disarray.
The military occupation of al-Anbar Province required patience, perseverance, and fortitude. The cities and towns were damaged, inhabitants demoralized, and little remained of civil authority. Hopes remained high that the occupation would be short–lived and that the Iraqis would pick themselves up and rebuild. However, those hopes died hard on the harsh realities of post-invasion Iraq. As the Marines took up new and unplanned responsibilities, insurgent violence continued and increased, generated by the national disarray of all social institutions. For the I and II Marine Expeditionary Forces, nation building
and combat operations would proceed alongside one another for most of their service in Iraq.
A work of this kind necessarily depends on the help and advice of many people. The original concept
of assigning this volume to an independent historian came from discussions in 2005 between then-Lieutenant General James N. Mattis, commanding the Marine Corps Combat Development Center, and Major General Donald R. Gardner (Ret), President of Marine Corps University. Major General Gardner launched the project and arranged for my appointment as a research fellow of his institution during 2006–08.
Officers and enlisted Marines of Inspector-Instructor, 4th Landing Support Battalion, Ft. Lewis, Washington,
cheerfully provided office space and support for my research and writing. Their readiness to assist extended in many instances to their advice and valued explanations of current procedures and operational matters, including in several cases experiences in Iraq during the period treated by this work. In particular, I thank Lieutenant Colonel Richard C. Smith, Major Wesley E. Souza, Captain Gregory
J. Chester, Captain Christopher J. Murphy, Sergeant Major Thomas Glembin, and Staff Sergeant M.
E. Johnston.
The Marine Corps University Foundation and Marine Corps Heritage Foundation supported me with a combined fellowship in 2006–08, administered by Brigadier General Thomas V. Draude (Ret). The staff of the Archives Branch, Library of the Marine Corps, Gray Research Center at Quantico, principally Michael Miller, Director, and Dr. Jim Ginther, Manuscript Curator, facilitated my use of their document collection. Mr. Scott A. Allen assisted me in understanding some of the contributions of the Marine Corps Systems Command to the campaign under study.
At the Marine Corps History Division, I enjoyed the camaraderie and shared knowledge of Charles Neimeyer, Director; Colonel Richard Camp and Colonel Patricia D. Saint, Deputy Directors; Charles Melson,
Chief Historian; Fred Allison, Oral Historian; and Master Gunnery Sergeant Robert A. Yarnall, historian.
I received assistance from the Reference Section: Danny A. Crawford, Robert V. Aquilina, Lena
M. Kaljot, Annette Amerman, Kara Newcomer, and Shelia Boyd. This work benefited from the editorial review of Colonel Charles A. Jones and the efforts of Julie H. Robert, History Division intern. The Editing
and Design Section oversaw final production: Ken Williams, Greg Macheak, Wanda Renfrow, Vince Martinez, and Steve Hill, who was the primary designer on the project.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: manuals&manuals on Jul 09, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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03/24/2014

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 U . S  . M A R I  N E  C O R P  S  O P  E  R A T  I  O N S  I  N I  R A Q , 0  0  3 - 0  0  6   E  S  T  E  S 
 
 
U.S. Marine Corps Operations in Iraq, 2003–2006
by Lieutenant Colonel Kenneth W. Estes U.S. Marine Corps (Retired)
Occasional Paper
History Division United States Marine Corps Quantico, Virginia 2009

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