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Dracula

Dracula

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Published by John ジョン Bejo

Author: Bram Stoker
Published: 1897
Language: English
Wordcount: 160,098 / 423 pg
LoC Category: PR
Series: World's Best Reading
Audiobook: librivox.org
Downloads: 24,721
mnybks.net#: 6694
Origin: gutenberg.org
More Info: litsum.com
Genres: Horror, Gothic, Fiction & Literature, Audiobook

The world's best-known vampire story begins by following a naive young Englishman as he visits Transylvania to meet a client, the mysterious Count Dracula. Upon revealing his true nature, Dracula boards a ship for England, where chilling and gruesome disasters begin to befall the people of London...

Author: Bram Stoker
Published: 1897
Language: English
Wordcount: 160,098 / 423 pg
LoC Category: PR
Series: World's Best Reading
Audiobook: librivox.org
Downloads: 24,721
mnybks.net#: 6694
Origin: gutenberg.org
More Info: litsum.com
Genres: Horror, Gothic, Fiction & Literature, Audiobook

The world's best-known vampire story begins by following a naive young Englishman as he visits Transylvania to meet a client, the mysterious Count Dracula. Upon revealing his true nature, Dracula boards a ship for England, where chilling and gruesome disasters begin to befall the people of London...

More info:

Published by: John ジョン Bejo on Jul 14, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/11/2013

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Dracula, by Bram Stoker
The Project Gutenberg EBook of Dracula, by Bram Stoker This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere atno cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the termsof the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: DraculaAuthor: Bram StokerRelease Date: May 9, 2008 [EBook #345]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ASCII*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK DRACULA ***DRACULAbyBram Stoker1897 editionTABLE OF CONTENTS
Dracula, by Bram Stoker1
 
CHAPTER
1Jonathan Harker's Journal 2 Jonathan Harker's Journal 3 Jonathan Harker's Journal 4 Jonathan Harker'sJournal 5 Letter From Miss Mina Murray To Miss Lucy Westenra 6 Mina Murray's Journal 7 Cutting From"The Dailygraph", 8 August 8 Mina Murray's Journal 9 Letter, Mina Harker To Lucy Westenra 10 Letter, Dr.Seward To Hon. Arthur Holmwood 11 Lucy Westenra's Diary 12 Dr. Seward's Diary 13 Dr. Seward's Diary14 Mina Harker's Journal 15 Dr. Seward's Diary 16 Dr. Seward's Diary 17 Dr. Seward's Diary 18 Dr. Seward'sDiary 19 Jonathan Harker's Journal 20 Jonathan Harker's Journal 21 Dr. Seward's Diary 22 Jonathan Harker'sJournal 23 Dr. Seward's Diary 24 Dr. Seward's Phonograph Diary 25 Dr. Seward's Diary 26 Dr. Seward'sDiary 27 Mina Harker's Journal
CHAPTER2
 
CHAPTER 1
Jonathan Harker's Journal3 May. Bistritz.--Left Munich at 8:35 P.M., on 1st May, arriving at Vienna early next morning; should havearrived at 6:46, but train was an hour late. Buda-Pesth seems a wonderful place, from the glimpse which I gotof it from the train and the little I could walk through the streets. I feared to go very far from the station, as wehad arrived late and would start as near the correct time as possible.The impression I had was that we were leaving the West and entering the East; the most western of splendidbridges over the Danube, which is here of noble width and depth, took us among the traditions of Turkish rule.We left in pretty good time, and came after nightfall to Klausenburgh. Here I stopped for the night at the HotelRoyale. I had for dinner, or rather supper, a chicken done up some way with red pepper, which was very goodbut thirsty. (Mem. get recipe for Mina.) I asked the waiter, and he said it was called "paprika hendl," and that,as it was a national dish, I should be able to get it anywhere along the Carpathians.I found my smattering of German very useful here, indeed, I don't know how I should be able to get onwithout it.Having had some time at my disposal when in London, I had visited the British Museum, and made searchamong the books and maps in the library regarding Transylvania; it had struck me that some foreknowledge of the country could hardly fail to have some importance in dealing with a nobleman of that country.I find that the district he named is in the extreme east of the country, just on the borders of three states,Transylvania, Moldavia, and Bukovina, in the midst of the Carpathian mountains; one of the wildest and leastknown portions of Europe.I was not able to light on any map or work giving the exact locality of the Castle Dracula, as there are no mapsof this country as yet to compare with our own Ordnance Survey Maps; but I found that Bistritz, the post townnamed by Count Dracula, is a fairly well-known place. I shall enter here some of my notes, as they mayrefresh my memory when I talk over my travels with Mina.In the population of Transylvania there are four distinct nationalities: Saxons in the South, and mixed withthem the Wallachs, who are the descendants of the Dacians; Magyars in the West, and Szekelys in the Eastand North. I am going among the latter, who claim to be descended from Attila and the Huns. This may be so,for when the Magyars conquered the country in the eleventh century they found the Huns settled in it.I read that every known superstition in the world is gathered into the horseshoe of the Carpathians, as if itwere the centre of some sort of imaginative whirlpool; if so my stay may be very interesting. (Mem., I mustask the Count all about them.)I did not sleep well, though my bed was comfortable enough, for I had all sorts of queer dreams. There was adog howling all night under my window, which may have had something to do with it; or it may have beenthe paprika, for I had to drink up all the water in my carafe, and was still thirsty. Towards morning I slept andwas wakened by the continuous knocking at my door, so I guess I must have been sleeping soundly then.I had for breakfast more paprika, and a sort of porridge of maize flour which they said was "mamaliga", andegg-plant stuffed with forcemeat, a very excellent dish, which they call "impletata". (Mem., get recipe for thisalso.)
CHAPTER 13

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