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Common Tomato Plant Problems

Common Tomato Plant Problems

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Published by papergold
Common Tomato Plant Problems - Let the Leaves Tell
the Story
Growing tomatoes in a home garden is a popular hobby for millions of people around the
world. Why?...because there is NOTHING like a fresh, juicy tomato from your very own
garden.
Unfortunately, tomato plant problems are also very common. Problems may include harmful
insects, diseases and improper care or fertilization. It doesn't matter whether you grow your
tomatoes in a garden, in a pot, on your deck, upside-down, right-side up or sideways, most
tomato plants can fall victim to any or all of these problems.
The leaves of your tomato plants are a great early indicator of potential problems. Regular,
weekly inspection of your tomato plant leaves will allow you to notice changes early and detect
problems while they can still be easily controlled. If a problem is allowed to go undetected, it
may become incurable and result in a total loss of the plant or crop.
Common Tomato Plant Problems - Let the Leaves Tell
the Story
Growing tomatoes in a home garden is a popular hobby for millions of people around the
world. Why?...because there is NOTHING like a fresh, juicy tomato from your very own
garden.
Unfortunately, tomato plant problems are also very common. Problems may include harmful
insects, diseases and improper care or fertilization. It doesn't matter whether you grow your
tomatoes in a garden, in a pot, on your deck, upside-down, right-side up or sideways, most
tomato plants can fall victim to any or all of these problems.
The leaves of your tomato plants are a great early indicator of potential problems. Regular,
weekly inspection of your tomato plant leaves will allow you to notice changes early and detect
problems while they can still be easily controlled. If a problem is allowed to go undetected, it
may become incurable and result in a total loss of the plant or crop.

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Published by: papergold on Jul 14, 2010
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This information is brought to you by 'All Things Tomato' at:http://tinyurl.com/33xwt4r
Common Tomato Plant Problems - Let the Leaves Tellthe Story
Growing tomatoes in a home garden is a popular hobby for millions of people around theworld.
Why?
...because there is NOTHING like a fresh, juicy tomato from your very owngarden.Unfortunately, tomato plant problems are also very common. Problems may include harmfulinsects, diseases and improper care or fertilization. It doesn't matter whether you grow yourtomatoes in a garden, in a pot, on your deck, upside-down, right-side up or sideways, mosttomato plants can fall victim to any or all of these problems.The leaves of your tomato plants are a great early indicator of potential problems. Regular,weekly inspection of your tomato plant leaves will allow you to notice changes early and detectproblems while they can still be easily controlled. If a problem is allowed to go undetected, itmay become incurable and result in a total loss of the plant or crop.Yellow leaves
 Symptom:
Yellow, uncurled leaves begin to form at the bottom of the plant and may work theirway up the plant.
Cause:
Yellow leaves are a common problem and may be caused by many things. If yellow,uncurled leaves appear at the base of a tomato plant, it may just be a sign of the plant agingand beginning to die off from the bottom up. It may also be caused by a nitrogen deficiency inthe soil.Other factors may cause yellow leaves including pest, fungus and bacterial infestations butthese causes usually result in deformed or curled yellow or brown leaves. For example, if theleaves are turning yellow or brown higher up on the plant, it may be a sign of early or lateblight. Have your soil tested at a local nursery to confirm the nitrogen-deficiency diagnosis.
 Remedy:
If the soil does have a nitrogen deficiency, supplement the soil with well-rottedmanure or compost, both of which are high in nitrogen. You can also apply a nitrogen-richfertilizer. If the soil test results do not show any deficiencies, continue to explore other causesincluding wilt or blight.Shiny, sticky, deformed leaves
 Symptom:
Leaves are deformed, sometimes yellow, and appear to have a shiny, stickysubstance on them. Young tomato plants are especially vulnerable to this "small" problem. Donot confuse this with "rolled" leaves which is a normal occurrence and not harmful to manytomato plants.
Cause
: Aphids are small, pear-shaped insects that congregate on the top growth or undersideof leaves. Aphids damage tomatoes by sucking plant sap and excreting a sticky substance onthe foliage and fruit. Inspect the deformed leaves or normal leaves in the vicinity and youshould be able to see these insects.Whiteflies and spider mites are also nearly invisible insects that can cause similar symptoms.Spider mites cause small yellow specks and fine webs on leaves. Whiteflies will actually takeflight when you brush the plant.
 Remedy:
Use an insecticidal soap or general-purpose garden dust to control any of these
 
insects.Brown patches on leaves
 Symptom:
Black or brown spots develop on plant leaves and they begin to fall off the plant.The plant may also produce fruits with a sunburned appearance.
Cause:
Early Blight is a fungus that survives during the winter on old vines left on the gardenfloor. Cleaning up old vines from the prior season, rotating crops and spacing plants properlyto allow for good air circulation are good first steps in avoiding this problem.
 Remedy:
Preventative measures should be considered first, ie. crop rotation and cleaning updebris from prior growing seasons. If you suspect your plants have Early Blight, remove alldiseased stems and foliage and dispose of in the trash. Do not add the plant debris to yourcompost pile. A general-purpose garden dust can sometimes be effective in controlling thedisease if caught in the early stages.Brown, dry, papery leaves
 Symptom:
Water-soaked patches appear on leaves that ultimately turn brown, dry and papery.Fruit and stems might also be spotted or have blackened areas.
Cause:
Late Blight is caused by a fungus that is favored by wet weather and whose spores cantravel great distances and infect large areas.
 Remedy:
Late Blight can be prevented or controlled in a similar fashion to Early Blight asdescribed above. If the area is severely infected, removing all plants and disposing in the trashmay be the only solution.Large sections of suddenly wilted leaves and stems
 Symptom:
Fusarium Wilt causes leaves on one branch of infected plant to wilt and turn yellow.Verticillium Wilt first appears as yellowing between the major veins on mature leaves.
Cause:
Both wilts are caused by a fungal infestation. The fungus is inherent in the plant and isnot caused or affected by external sources such as weather or care.
 Remedy:
Unfortunately there is no treatment for a plant infected with Fusarium orVerticillium Wilt. It will spread rapidly through the plant and eventually kill it. The bestremedy is to quickly dispose of the entire plant in the trash. Do not add the debris to yourcompost pile. To limit the risk of wilt reappearing in the future, seeds or seedlings should beselected carefully. Many varieties are resistant to wilt and although it doesn't guarantee itwon't occur, it significantly limits the risk.Visit the author's illustrated reference,10 Tomato Plant Problems, for moredetailed information on growing tomatoes.Article Source:http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Suzy_T

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