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2012 The End of the World?

2012 The End of the World?

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Published by MustardSeedNews
The year 2000 came and went. If we flash back for a moment, we’ll recall that in the lead-up to 2000, chaos was predicted to envelop our computerized and electrified civilization. It was called Y2K: a simple flaw in computer software design was supposed to bring about the end of the civilized world. Power stations, telecommunications, bank accounts, billing processes were all supposed to grind to a halt or be thrown into a state of chaos...
The year 2000 came and went. If we flash back for a moment, we’ll recall that in the lead-up to 2000, chaos was predicted to envelop our computerized and electrified civilization. It was called Y2K: a simple flaw in computer software design was supposed to bring about the end of the civilized world. Power stations, telecommunications, bank accounts, billing processes were all supposed to grind to a halt or be thrown into a state of chaos...

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Published by: MustardSeedNews on Jul 22, 2010
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10/10/2013

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The Endof the
 
W
orld (Yet Again)?
 
 
T
he year 2000 came and went.
If we flash back for a moment, we’ll recall that in the lead-up to 2000, chaos was predicted to envelop ourcomputerized and electrified civilization. It was called Y2K: a simple flaw in computer software design was supposed to bring about the end of thecivilized world. Power stations, telecommunications, bank accounts,billing processes were all supposed to grind to a halt or be thrown into astate of chaos.But it never happened. Instead, the end of 1999 and the beginning of 2000 is best remembered for the stupendous displays of fireworks inprincipal cities of the world, many of them televised and shared withviewers in all nations. The specter of doomsday was a phantom. A decade later, where are we? Wars are being fought in Iraq and Afghanistan using sophisticated computerized weaponry. A languishingglobal economy is desperately trying to revive itself. The Internet is anindispensable part of life for the majority in the Western world and evenfor a considerable number of individuals in the developing world. And weare being told about another approaching doomsday.If we are to believe the latest hype, December 21 or 23, 2012, is when the world will
really 
come to a climactic end. This time the fear has beensparked by an interpretation of the ancient Mayan calendar, furthered by 
 
numerous books and documentaries. And it has spawned, perhapspredictably, yet another Hollywood disaster movie.The supposed cataclysm of 2012 may appear to be corroborated by somesources, ranging from economics to science. That’s not to say that 2012 isnecessarily central to their concerns; in some cases, it’s just a convenientpeg on which to hang their hat as they rally support for other pet theories.But does the Mayan calendar really speak of an end of the world, or is it just the end of one calendar cycle—a recurring event according to Mayanreckoning? Those who have studied the calendar and the culture thatdeveloped it dismiss the entire end-of-the-world prediction as amisinterpretation of the data: they say that it doesn’t speak of an end per sebut of a new beginning.
(See “Mayan Mayhem: Is 2012 the End of the World?”) 
Still, the Mayan calendar is not the only source of current apocalypticangst. The words of Nostradamus also figure heavily into the latestprognostications. In fact, an Internet search on “Nostradamus 2012” yieldsnearly 1.5 million hits. Nostradamus wrote on religious themes; indeed,the 2012 theme has become a phenomenon for the New Age movementand thus a religious event.But the 16th-century seer’s writings, recorded in quatrains, or poetry infour-line format, are flexible enough to support any of several apocalypticscenarios that are being put forward today. One Web site that providesresources and background material for those interested in 2012 offers thisevaluation of Nostradamus: “He is best known for his book 
Les Propheties 
. . . . Many of his prophecies dealt with disaster such as plagues,earthquakes, wars, floods and the coming of three antichrists. However hispredictions are vague and people tend to apply his words to many situations.”

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