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Table Of Contents

OTHER ACTIVITIES – Ian Hodder & Shahina Farid
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Introduction to the Excavation Areas – Shahina Farid
Building 77 – Michael House, Lisa Yeomans
External areas and the stratigraphic sequence – Lisa Yeomans
Trench 5-7 Pottery - Ingmar Franz
Description of the natural sequence - Chris Doherty
Phytolith analysis 2008 - Philippa Ryan
Study of botanical inclusions in mudbrick
Ethnobotanical work in the Konya region and beyond
Phytolith report 2008 - Philippa Ryan
Starch - Renée van de Locht (1), Karen Hardy (2)
2008 Pottery Archive Report - Nurcan Yalman, Hilal Gültekin, Duygu Tarkan
Clay Stamp Archive Report 2008 - Julie Cassidy
2008 Clay Building Materials - Mirjana Stevanovic
South Area – Marina Milić
Conservation - Duygu Çamurcuoğlu
Re-opening of the Building 5 - Kelly Caldwell
Other conservation projects (Duygu Çamurcuoğlu)
Fire and burning at Çatalhöyük, 2008 – Karl Harrison
Introduction to the Çatalhöyük Summer School – Shahina Farid
2008 Çatalhöyük Summer School Project - Gülay Sert
Community Archaeology Research - Sonya Atalay
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Catalhoyuk 2008 archaeology Archive Report

Catalhoyuk 2008 archaeology Archive Report

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Published by urbanom
2008 SEASON REVIEW
Hitting the jackpot at Çatalhöyük – Ian Hodder
We have always at Çatalhöyük been working in the shadow of James Mellaart and the
exciting discoveries he made at the site in the 1960s. Çatalhöyük is an important Neolithic site
near Çumra, Konya. It was inhabited by up to 8000 people who lived in a large ‘town’. There
were no streets and people moved around on the roof tops and entered their houses through
holes in the roofs. Inside their houses people made wonderful art – paintings, reliefs and
sculptures – which have survived across the millennia. It was particularly this art that made
the site so famous. James Mellaart and his wife Arlette made remarkable discoveries of bull
horns attached to plastered bull skulls (bucrania), plaster reliefs, and wonderful paintings,
both non-figurative and with complex narrative content.
Since the current project began in 1993, we have been working slowly, using the full suite of
latest scientific and forensic techniques to tease apart the activities that took place at the site.
We have made some wonderful discoveries, as have been reported in my reports to Anatolian
Archaeology over the years. But they always seemed rather less dramatic than those found
by the Mellaarts in their larger scale excavations. But in 2008 we began to feel for the first
time that we were having a ‘Mellaart season’! Suddenly we cam across a burned building that
looked very much like what James Mellaart would clearly have called a ‘shrine’ with well
preserved pedestals on which were placed bull horns, and in another building we found
paintings.
2008 SEASON REVIEW
Hitting the jackpot at Çatalhöyük – Ian Hodder
We have always at Çatalhöyük been working in the shadow of James Mellaart and the
exciting discoveries he made at the site in the 1960s. Çatalhöyük is an important Neolithic site
near Çumra, Konya. It was inhabited by up to 8000 people who lived in a large ‘town’. There
were no streets and people moved around on the roof tops and entered their houses through
holes in the roofs. Inside their houses people made wonderful art – paintings, reliefs and
sculptures – which have survived across the millennia. It was particularly this art that made
the site so famous. James Mellaart and his wife Arlette made remarkable discoveries of bull
horns attached to plastered bull skulls (bucrania), plaster reliefs, and wonderful paintings,
both non-figurative and with complex narrative content.
Since the current project began in 1993, we have been working slowly, using the full suite of
latest scientific and forensic techniques to tease apart the activities that took place at the site.
We have made some wonderful discoveries, as have been reported in my reports to Anatolian
Archaeology over the years. But they always seemed rather less dramatic than those found
by the Mellaarts in their larger scale excavations. But in 2008 we began to feel for the first
time that we were having a ‘Mellaart season’! Suddenly we cam across a burned building that
looked very much like what James Mellaart would clearly have called a ‘shrine’ with well
preserved pedestals on which were placed bull horns, and in another building we found
paintings.

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Published by: urbanom on Jul 25, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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