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Blue and Red in Notitia Dignitatum

Blue and Red in Notitia Dignitatum

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Published by jwr47
The Books Exodus and Chronicles reveal a great number of symbolic coloured woven materials (red, blue and purple twining) in the divine instructions for the Covenant tent and for Solomon's temple. Medieval paintings and illuminated manuscripts provide us with a vast number of red and blue coloured illustrations, in which these colours seem to represent religious symbols.

Roman historians report the religious symbolism in purple decorations for the senators and purple garments for the emperor and his family. Purple stripes (named clavi) were reserved for the knights and senators. As a divine emperor Nero reserved purple clothing for the imperial family.

As more recent document the 5th century Notitia Dignitatum probably represents the missing link between Exodus, the symbolism in Roman garments and the medieval illuminated Bibles. Notitia Dignitatum details administrative symbols in the Roman empire, which at that time already had been governed for 90-100 years by a religious tolerance of Christianity. The manuscript(s) provides us with an overview of the late Roman shield patterns for the military forces around 400 AD.

A quick look at the Late Roman Shield Patterns for the 127 units under the overall command of the Master of the Foot will convince us of the dominance of the colours red, blue, orange, black and white. Only minor amounts of purple, green and yellow have been used. These shield patterns may have been widely known throughout the Roman empire, resulting in popular symbols for shield patterns among the Celtic and Germanic soldiers, generals and their kings. The patters probably survived the medieval chaotic eras and were to be remembered in later times for medieval garments and coats of arms. We remember most of the royal garments and coats of arms in the Middle Age have been coloured red, blue, black, white and golden.

This manuscript documents some of the Roman samples and compares the patterns with medieval symbolism, which reveal a striking correspondence between modern coats of arms and modern flags.
The Books Exodus and Chronicles reveal a great number of symbolic coloured woven materials (red, blue and purple twining) in the divine instructions for the Covenant tent and for Solomon's temple. Medieval paintings and illuminated manuscripts provide us with a vast number of red and blue coloured illustrations, in which these colours seem to represent religious symbols.

Roman historians report the religious symbolism in purple decorations for the senators and purple garments for the emperor and his family. Purple stripes (named clavi) were reserved for the knights and senators. As a divine emperor Nero reserved purple clothing for the imperial family.

As more recent document the 5th century Notitia Dignitatum probably represents the missing link between Exodus, the symbolism in Roman garments and the medieval illuminated Bibles. Notitia Dignitatum details administrative symbols in the Roman empire, which at that time already had been governed for 90-100 years by a religious tolerance of Christianity. The manuscript(s) provides us with an overview of the late Roman shield patterns for the military forces around 400 AD.

A quick look at the Late Roman Shield Patterns for the 127 units under the overall command of the Master of the Foot will convince us of the dominance of the colours red, blue, orange, black and white. Only minor amounts of purple, green and yellow have been used. These shield patterns may have been widely known throughout the Roman empire, resulting in popular symbols for shield patterns among the Celtic and Germanic soldiers, generals and their kings. The patters probably survived the medieval chaotic eras and were to be remembered in later times for medieval garments and coats of arms. We remember most of the royal garments and coats of arms in the Middle Age have been coloured red, blue, black, white and golden.

This manuscript documents some of the Roman samples and compares the patterns with medieval symbolism, which reveal a striking correspondence between modern coats of arms and modern flags.

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Published by: jwr47 on Jul 26, 2010
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06/26/2013

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Blue and Red inNotitia Dignitatum
 
Joannes Richter 
 
 Fig. 1: 12 Patterns for the Legiones Palatinae
 
1Introduction
The Books Exodus and Chronicles reveal a great number of symbolic coloured woven materials (
red, blue
 
and
 
 purpletwining 
) in the divine instructions for the Covenant tent andfor Solomon's temple
1
.Medieval paintings and illuminated manuscripts provide uswith a vast number of red and blue coloured illustrations, inwhich these colours seem to represent religious symbols.Roman historians report the religious symbolism in purpledecorations for the senators and purple garments for theemperor and his family. Purple stripes (named
clavi
) werereserved for the knights and senators. As a divine emperor  Nero reserved
 purple
clothing for the imperial family
2
. As more recent document the 5
th
century Notitia Dignitatum  probably represents the missing link between Exodus, thesymbolism in Roman garments and the medieval illuminatedBibles.
 Notitia Dignitatum
details administrative symbols in theRoman empire, which at that time already had been governedfor 90-100 years by a religious tolerance of Christianity
3
. Themanuscript(s) provides us with an overview of the late Romanshield patterns for the military forces around 400 AD.
1
Exodus 28:2-5. See the documentation inThe Hermetic Codex 
2
 
see the documentation in The Hermetic Codex 
3
 
after Saint Constantine issued the Edict of Milan in 313, which proclaimedreligious tolerance of Christians throughout the empire.
2
 
A quick look at theLate Roman Shield Patternsfor the 127units under the overall command of the
Master of the Foot 
willconvince us of the dominance of the colours
red, blue, orange,black 
and
white
. Only minor amounts of purple, green andyellow have been used.These shield patterns may have been widely known throughoutthe Roman empire, resulting in popular symbols for shield patterns among the Celtic and Germanic soldiers, generals andtheir kings. The patters probably survived the medieval chaoticeras and were to be remembered in later times for medievalgarments and coats of arms. We remember most of the royalgarments and coats of arms in the Middle Age have beencoloured
red, blue, black, white
and
 golden
.This manuscript documents some of the Roman samples andcompares the patterns with medieval symbolism, which reveala striking correspondence between modern coats of arms andmodern flags. The other illustrations of the
 Notitia Dignitatum
are quite similar and do not really deliver more insight at thistime.3

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