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Tolstoy - War and Peace

Tolstoy - War and Peace

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Published by: DezereiMei's Donaire on Jul 29, 2010
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10/25/2012

 
Coradella Collegiate Bookshelf Editions.
 War and Peace.Leo Tolstoy.
 
Leo Tolstoy. War and Peace.
 About the author 
Leo Nikolayevitch Tolstoy (September 9, 1828 – Novem-ber 20, 1910) was a Russiannovelist, reformer, and moralthinker, notable for his influenceon Russian literature and poli-tics. As a count, Tolstoy was amember of the Russian nobility. Tolstoy was one of the giants of 19th century Russian literature.His most famous works include the novels War and Peace and AnnaKarenina, and many shorter works, including the novella The Death of Ivan Ilyich and "Ivan the Fool".His autobiographical novels,
Childhood 
,
Boyhood 
, and
Youth
, his firstpublications (1852–1856), tell of a rich landowner's son and his slow realization of the differences between him and his peasant playmates.Although in later life Tolstoy rejected these books as sentimental, agreat deal of his own life is revealed, and the books still have relevancefor their telling of the universal story of growing up. Tolstoy served as a second lieutenant in the Russian Army duringthe Crimean War. His experiences in battle help develop his pacifism,and gave him material for realistic depiction of the horrors of war in hislater work.His fiction consistently attempts to convey realistically the Russiansociety in which he lived. Cossacks (1863) describes the Cossack lifeand people through a story of a Russian aristocrat in love with a Cos-sack girl. Anna Karenina (1867) tells parallel stories of a woman trappedby the conventions of society and of a philosophical landowner (muchlike Tolstoy), who works alongside his serfs in the fields and seeks toreform their lives.Pierre Bezukhov in War and Peace is another character whose lifereflects that of the author. War and Peace is famous for the breadth of its canvas. Its title topics are only the beginning of its ambitious inclu-siveness, but most of his works had strong stories, broad social descrip-tion, and philosophical overtones. In The Death of Ivan Ilyich (1884), Tolstoy faces his own fear of death. Tolstoy had a profound influence on the development of anarchistthought. Prince Peter Kropotkin wrote of him in the article on Anar-chism in the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica: Without naming himself an anarchist, Leo Tolstoy, like his prede-cessors in the popular religious movements of the fifteenth and six-teenth centuries, Chojecki, Denk and many others, took the anarchistposition as regards the state and property rights, deducing his conclu-sions from the general spirit of the teachings of Jesus Christ and fromthe necessary dictates of reason. With all the might of his talent hemade (especially in The Kingdom of God is Within You) a powerfulcriticism of the church, the state and law altogether, and especially of the present property laws. He describes the state as the domination of the wicked ones, supported by brutal force. Robbers, he says, are farless dangerous than a well-organized government. He makes a search-ing criticism of the prejudices which are current now concerning thebenefits conferred upon men by the church, the state and the existingdistribution of property, and from the teachings of the Christ he de-duces the rule of non-resistance and the absolute condemnation of all wars. His religious arguments are, however, so well combined witharguments borrowed from a dispassionate observation of the presentevils, that the anarchist portions of his works appeal to the religiousand the non-religious reader alike.A letter Tolstoy wrote to an Indian newspaper entitled "A Letterto a Hindu (http://sources.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letter_to_a_Hindu_-_Leo_Tolstoy)" resulted in a long-running correspondence withMohandas Gandhi, who was in South Africa at the time and wasbeginning to become an activist. The correspondence with Tolsto
 
Leo Tolstoy. War and Peace.
Contents
Book 1.Chapter 1.Chapter 2.Chapter 3.Chapter 4.Chapter 5.Chapter 6.Chapter 7.Chapter 8.Chapter 9.Chapter 10.Chapter 11.Chapter 12.Chapter 13.Chapter 14.Chapter 15.Chapter 16.Chapter 17.Book 3.Chapter 1.Chapter 2.Chapter 3.Chapter 4.Chapter 5.Chapter 6.Chapter 7.Chapter 8.Chapter 9.Chapter 10.Chapter 11.Chapter 12.Chapter 13.Chapter 14.Chapter 15.Chapter 16.Chapter 17.Chapter 18.Chapter 19.Book 4.Chapter 1.Chapter 2.Chapter 3.Chapter 4.Chapter 5.Chapter 6.Chapter 7.Chapter 8.Chapter 9.Chapter 10.Chapter 11.Chapter 12.Chapter 13.Chapter 14.Chapter 15.Chapter 16.Book 5.Chapter 1.Chapter 2.Chapter 3.Chapter 4.Chapter 5.Chapter 6.Chapter 7.Chapter 8.Chapter 9.Chapter 10.Chapter 11.Chapter 12.Chapter 13.Chapter 14.Chapter 15.Chapter 16.Chapter 17.Chapter 18.Chapter 19.Chapter 20.Chapter 21.Chapter 22.Book 6.Chapter 1.Chapter 2.Chapter 3.Chapter 4.Chapter 5.Chapter 6.Chapter 7.Chapter 8.Chapter 9.Chapter 10.Chapter 11.Chapter 12.Chapter 13.Chapter 14.Chapter 15.Chapter 16.Chapter 17.Chapter 18.Chapter 19.Chapter 20.Chapter 21.Chapter 22.Chapter 23.Chapter 24.Chapter 25.Chapter 26.Book 7.Chapter 1.Chapter 2.Chapter 3.Chapter 4.Chapter 5.Chapter 6.Chapter 7.Chapter 8.Chapter 9.Chapter 10.Chapter 11.Chapter 12.Chapter 13.Book 8.Chapter 1.Chapter 2.Chapter 3.Chapter 4.Chapter 5.Chapter 6.Chapter 7.Chapter 8.Click on a num-ber in the chapter listto go to the first pageof that chapter.Contents are con-tinued on the nexpage.Note: The best way toread this ebook is inFull Screen mode:click View, FullScreen to set AdobeAcrobat to FullScreen View. Thismode allows you touse Page Down to goto the next page, andaffords the best read-ing view. Press Escapeto exit the Full ScreenView.
strongly influenced Gandhi towards the concept of nonviolent resis-tance, a central part of Tolstoy's view of Christianity. Along with hisgrowing idealism, he also became a major supporter of the Esperantomovement. Tolstoy was an extremely wealthy member of the Russian nobility.He came to believe that he was undeserving of his inherited wealth,and was renowned among the peasantry for his generosity. He wouldfrequently return to his country estate with vagrants whom he feltneeded a helping hand, and would often dispense large sums of money to street beggars while on trips to the city, much to his wife's chagrin. When he died in 1910, thousands of peasants turned out to line thestreets at his funeral.