Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
CPM Newsletter Volume 12 No 2_WEB

CPM Newsletter Volume 12 No 2_WEB

Ratings: (0)|Views: 57|Likes:
Published by ramphoto1
Center For Photography at Madison Quarterly Newsletter
Center For Photography at Madison Quarterly Newsletter

More info:

Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: ramphoto1 on Aug 01, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/25/2012

pdf

text

original

 
CPM UARTERLY
ThE NEwsLETTER foR ThE CENTER foR PhoTogRAPhY AT MAdisoNVoLUME 12
j
No. 2
j
sUMMER 2010
PRESIDENT’S LETTER
j
VSA ARTS of WIScoNSIN AND cPM ExhIbIT AT PRoMEgA [2]INTERVIEW WITh TED oRLAND [3]PhoToMIDWEST guEST PhoTogRAPhERS To LEcTuRE IN ocTobER [4]PhoTo ExhIbITS WIThIN A DAy’S DRIVE [6]chIcAgo TRIP PLANNED
j
cALL foR ENTRIES
 
[7]cALENDAR
j
MEMbER NEWS [8]cPM: ThE bEgINNINgS [10]hIghLIghTS of cPM AT 12 [11]INfoRMATIoN oN PhoTogRAPhy cLASSES foR 2010
j
bRANch, LEAf, bLoSSoM [12]WhEN you LIVE ALoNE, A PoEM by RIchARD WILbERg [13]JoIN cPM! MEMbERShIP foRM INSIDE [14]MAP AND DIREcTIoNS To cPM [15]
II I Iu:
Sullivan’s Tavern 
 Riard Qinne
 
2
CPM QUARTERLY
VoLUME 12, NUMbER 2
sUMMER 2010
As we settle into the easy chairs in our new home
at 303 S. Paterson Street in Madison, Suite E2, we want to express our gratitude to
biLL
 
PATTERsoN
, who donated 15 boxes o books or the start o our
new library. Also, thank you to the volunteers
 who helped transport these books to CPM on a
hot rainy Sunday aernoon:
ToM
 
Mish
and his
 wie
dEbbiE
 
YoshihARA
,
dAVid
 
sCAdLoCk
,
dAN
 
RiCh
, and
bob
 
bEAVERsoN
. We are happyto announce that
doRY
 
bLobNER
has agreed tobe our Librarian.
Keep your eye on the weekly emails or an
announcement o a date to donate books or ourlibrary and upcoming book sale.
Tanks also to all the members who submitted
images or our First Look photography book.
Te photos will be on their way to the juror this
 week. Our plan is to have it available by the 2010Photomidwest.It’s also well worth your time to visit Promega, to
see some o the photos rom the VSA and CPM
collaboration.
PREsidENT’s LETTER
And now or a brie introduction to the Center
or Photography at Madison. At CPM, we aspire
to help you go rom beginner to accomplished photographer, by providing classes, discussion
groups, and lectures by experts in their felds.You may choose to start with the Plastic Camera,
Human Interest, Landscape, Nature, and/or Digital
Groups. Each will introduce you to the techniques
 you need to take the images you want (whether black
and white or color). Tese groups will also connect
 you with other olks who share your interests.
 We put out a Quarterly newsletter, as well as Weeklyemails and a Website, all to inorm you o where and
 when you can fnd the tools you want. It may be an
outing with a proessional photographer. Or maybea lighting class, or a philosophical discussion group.
Once you are ready, we work with many venuesto help you hang your work. We are starting tohang shows with images submitted by multiple
 photographers. I you have an image you are ready
to hang, bring it to one o our groups and introduce
a topic or a show. I think you will be surprised atthe result. We just took down a show on Sedona,
 June 15 was the opening reception or the joint VSA/CPM exhibit at Promega, 5445 E. Cheryl
Parkway, Fitchburg. It is open to the public 8 a.m.to 4 p.m. M–F until the end o August.
Tis event was a huge success! Te exhibit is the
culmination o classes taught by CPM volunteerinstructors or the VSA clients with disabilities.
Each student selected, edited and ramed six images
or inclusion in the exhibit. Te instructors
MARk
AMbRosE
,
CARL bowsER
,
REECE
 
doNihi
,
AbbY
 
hood
,
TRACY
 
MAdisoN
,
PATRiCk
 
PATTERsoN
,
biLL
 
PiELsTiCkER
,
ChRis
 
sPENsER
,
doRiTh
 
sTEiNbERg
and
kRisTiN
 
sUMbLER
, also
submitted works or the show.
he opening reception was attended by
approximately 200 people, and several reprints
 were sold. While there were several notable guestsat the reception, one was rom the VSA National
Headquarters in Washington DC, a partner
 with the Kennedy Center or the Perorming 
Arts. She came speciically or this exhibit, and
 was extremely impressed with the photos, the
 program overall, and the partnership between
CPM and VSA.
At the end o the reception the guests were invitedto stay or a premiere showing o the flm Shooting 
Beauty. Tis is an award winning documentary
flm about a ashion photographer in Boston who
 put cameras in the hands o people with cerebral palsy with amazing results.
I you are interested in participating in a utureclass with VSA, please contact Reece Donihi or
Chris Spencer.
VsA ARTs of wisCoNsiN ANd CPM ExhibiT AT PRoMEgA
Arizona with multiple photographers: it receivedgreat reviews.Te Board has changed recently;
JohN
 
MURRAY
 
MAsoN
, Secretary or the last seven years, is
stepping down.
doN
 
MENdENhAL
is the newest
member o the board. When you see John and
Don, please thank them or their volunteer spirit.Finally, we’d like to determine a time when CPM
may be open to the members and general public on weekends or a ew hours. Anyone who has time orideas, please contact any Board member or mysel.
I always look orward to your calls and letters. Please
keep letting us know how we are doing.
REECE doNihiCPM PREsidENT608-643-8326RAMPhoTo@VERizoN.NET
Isaac Ehrhardt with his Eyes 
 cris Spener
Promega Opening with VA and CPM participants
 
sUMMER 2010
VoLUME 12, NUMbER 2
CPM QUARTERLY
3
ed Orland talks about his work at 7 p.m., Oct. 28,
at this all’s PhotoMidwest. He is also oering a
 workshop,
 Embracing the Plastic Camera
, 7–10 p.m.
Oct. 29, and 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Oct. 30: see PMW’s
 website to register. ed graciously consented to
an interview with CPM. Many thanks to Patricia
Delker or helping rame these questions.
1. You made a giant leap proessionally when you
exchanged a large ormat camera on a tripodor a Holga you carry everywhere. Do you see
the world diferently, as a result?
I think that as artists we’d all like to
 work with tools that eel like a naturalextension o our own spirit—that see
the world the way we do, so to speak.Tat doesn’t always happen instantly
or easily—at least it didn’t in my case.I jumped into photography by taking 
an Ansel Adams Workshop, and not
surprisingly spent the next several years making large-ormat B&W
Adamsonian landscapes. It took me
 years to realize that I really don’t lead a
fne-grained lie—that ar more oen
lie was whooshing right past me while
I was trying to set up my tripod.
Discovering the Holga changed that
equation. You see an entirely dierent
 world thru a plastic viewfnder than on a4" × 5" ground glass. Where larger cameras
lead you to work careully and precisely, Holgas
encourage you to shoot frst and ask questions later.
And where view camera users embrace the clarity
and limitless detail o real things, Holga users revel
in the uzzy ambiance o ephemeral moments. At
least metaphorically, the question to ask might be:
is your world flled with nouns, or verbs?
2. Has your work changed since you began
employing a scanner?
Every technical change brings artistic consequences,
revealing new possibilities even as it closes the
door on previously available options. In my case, Iclosed my printing darkroom nearly ten years ago,
and since then have scanned all my new Holga
negatives into the computer to prepare them or
output digitally.
All things considered, the advantages o ollowing that technical pathway have vastly outweighed thedrawbacks. I continue to make pictures in the feld
 just as I always have, but now have a wonderul
range o new artistic options lining the way romthere to the fnished print.
Aer thirty years as a B&W photographer, or
instance, I’m now able to work with color flm
(a technology I previously avoided because o its toxicity and expense). Likewise, I can nowmake much larger (and better!) prints than I
ever could in the darkroom, and choose rom a
 vastly wider range o paper suraces. I can also
montage individual rames and assemble intricate
multi-image panoramas—a eat that would be
utterly impossible (at least or me) to achieve in
the darkroom. And though it’s not a large part o 
my work, I love having the option o manipulating 
borders, adding type, and removing occasional
telephone poles rom people’s heads.
3. What motivated you to write
 Art & Fear 
?
Can you tell us a bit about how you regard
art production now?
About twenty years ago my riend David Bayles
invited me to collaborate with him on a project he
 was initiating to write about the obstacles artists ace
in trying to get their work done. David & I are both
 working artists ourselves, and initially we viewed this
mainly as a way to clariy our thoughts on topics we
requently engaged with students at photography workshops. As a spino beneft it also provided a
fne excuse or getting together or spirited debates
over long dinners (and ormidable quantities o cheap
zinandel). Well, time passed, and eventually we
realized that we’d generated almost enough material
to call it a “book”—and indeed, three or our
 years later
 Art & Fear 
rolled o the presses.
I don’t think a lot has changed or artists
since then (even though the photographic
marketplace and the number o 
aspiring photographic artists has grown
dramatically). One thing that has changed,
however, is the overall awareness o the
challenges acing artists. When
 Art & 
 Fear 
appeared on the scene it was the only
book o its kind—in act it was rejected
by the frst two publishers we approached
because they couldn’t fgure out where it
 would possibly ft on bookstore shelves.
Now, however, there’s a whole category in
some bookstores devoted to “Creativity”.
4. Can you say something about the role
o photo clubs/support groups, and
their helpulness to you, personally?
I’m a big an o artists’ support groups. As a
generalization I think they’re oen most valuable
to people who work in non-art-related felds and
 would otherwise have little contact with the art world,
and to younger artists who have le school and eel
like they’ve stepped into an artistic vacuum. Tat
said, I do currently belong to three nearby artistsgroups, each o which meets locally on a more-or-less monthly basis. My own personal motivation
is mostly just to enjoy the comaraderie o kindredspirits and to share stories with my ellow travelersin photography. Simply put, being part o a group
keeps me engaged with the outside world—le
to mysel I’d probably just curl up in a ball in my
studio and lead a completely hermit-like existence!
iNTERViEw wiTh TEd oRLANd
Tree, Merced River, Winter, #2 
 Ted orland

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->