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Malaysia Stakeholder Dialogue June 2010

Malaysia Stakeholder Dialogue June 2010

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Published by PEFC International
With forests in the Asia-Pacific region being among the world’s most complex – and threatened – ecosystems, PEFC International in collaboration with the Malaysian Timber Certification Council (MTCC) invited stakeholders to a two-day seminar to update on sustainable forest management and forest certification initiatives in the region and to discuss PEFC’s draft revised forest management standard from a local perspective.

Forest certification is a voluntary, market driven approach to promote sustainable forest management. While it is undeniably one of the most effective tools in safeguarding the world's most biodiverse terrestrial ecosystems, only eight percent of the world's forests are currently certified.

The Asia Pacific region is home to 14% of the world's forest, including some of the last remaining primary rain forests. Yet, approximately 60% of the world's population live in the Asia Pacific region. Population pressure, coupled with growing economies on the one hand and extreme poverty on the other, creates many challenges and opportunities – environmentally, socially, and economically – for the forests, which in themselves play an important role in many of the countries.

How forest certification in Asia-Pacific, the first day of the Stakeholder Dialogue was dedicated to providing an overview over existing forest certification in the region. The second day of the event discussed the relevance and appropriateness of PEFC’s draft revised international criteria at a regional and national level.

“For forest management to be sustainable, it must reflect the national context and the specific ecological and environmental conditions, as well as social, economic, political, cultural and spiritual dimensions,” explained PEFC Secretary General Ben Gunneberg. “This is why PEFC requires standards to be developed at local level, in compliance with PEFC’s internationally recognized Sustainability Benchmarks. “

“Ongoing engagement between and among national and international stakeholders is a cornerstone of PEFC’s approach to forest certification, and the Malaysian Stakeholder Dialogue is the latest successful example of this approach.”

The Dialogue, which was attended by more than 150 national, regional and international forestry experts, concluded with a field trip showcasing sustainable forest management practices in Malaysia.

The next PEFC Stakeholder Dialogue will take place on 10th November 2010 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with further information becoming available shortly.
With forests in the Asia-Pacific region being among the world’s most complex – and threatened – ecosystems, PEFC International in collaboration with the Malaysian Timber Certification Council (MTCC) invited stakeholders to a two-day seminar to update on sustainable forest management and forest certification initiatives in the region and to discuss PEFC’s draft revised forest management standard from a local perspective.

Forest certification is a voluntary, market driven approach to promote sustainable forest management. While it is undeniably one of the most effective tools in safeguarding the world's most biodiverse terrestrial ecosystems, only eight percent of the world's forests are currently certified.

The Asia Pacific region is home to 14% of the world's forest, including some of the last remaining primary rain forests. Yet, approximately 60% of the world's population live in the Asia Pacific region. Population pressure, coupled with growing economies on the one hand and extreme poverty on the other, creates many challenges and opportunities – environmentally, socially, and economically – for the forests, which in themselves play an important role in many of the countries.

How forest certification in Asia-Pacific, the first day of the Stakeholder Dialogue was dedicated to providing an overview over existing forest certification in the region. The second day of the event discussed the relevance and appropriateness of PEFC’s draft revised international criteria at a regional and national level.

“For forest management to be sustainable, it must reflect the national context and the specific ecological and environmental conditions, as well as social, economic, political, cultural and spiritual dimensions,” explained PEFC Secretary General Ben Gunneberg. “This is why PEFC requires standards to be developed at local level, in compliance with PEFC’s internationally recognized Sustainability Benchmarks. “

“Ongoing engagement between and among national and international stakeholders is a cornerstone of PEFC’s approach to forest certification, and the Malaysian Stakeholder Dialogue is the latest successful example of this approach.”

The Dialogue, which was attended by more than 150 national, regional and international forestry experts, concluded with a field trip showcasing sustainable forest management practices in Malaysia.

The next PEFC Stakeholder Dialogue will take place on 10th November 2010 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with further information becoming available shortly.

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Published by: PEFC International on Aug 06, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/26/2013

 
 
16-18 June 2010 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
DEVELOPMENT OF FORESTCERTIFICATION IN ASIAPACIFIC & REVISION OF PEFCREQUIREMENTS FOR FORESTCERTIFICATION SYSTEMS
 
 
 
Stakeholder Dialogue
Development of Forest Certification in Asia Pacific &Revision of PEFC Requirements for Forest Certification Systems
Dear PEFC members and stakeholders,The most recent PEFC Stakeholder Dialogue held on 16-18 June 2010 in Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia focused on the revision of P
EFC‟s core documentation and requirements for 
sustainable forest management and forest certification schemes, and on forest certificationinitiatives in the Asia-Pacific region.We are indeed pleased that so many people were able to accept the joint invitation from PEFCInternational and MTCC to attend this stakeholder dialogue, which is the first such dialogueorganized under PEFC in the Asia-Pacific region.The Asia-Pacific region is not only home to some of the most complex, but also the mostthreatened forest ecosystems in the world. As the world's largest forest certification system andthe certification system of choice for hundreds of thousands of small- and family-forest owners, itis our collective responsibility to support the development of sustainable forest managementpractices and forest certification in the region with standards that integrate best practices, newscientific knowledge, stakeholder and customer expectations, as well as practical experiences onthe ground into standards that are globally relevant and locally applicable.Accordingly, the speakers, whose presentations you will find later in this document, came fromdifferent Asia-Pacific countries to present and share their experiences, challenges and successesin developing their certification initiatives.As PEFC is currently comprehensively reviewing and revising its benchmarks, this StakeholderDialogue also enabled stakeholder input for the ongoing Standards Revision process. Whilemarket and societal expectations as well as sound scientific knowledge are relevant, stakeholderparticipation and input is crucial to establish viable and pragmatic standards.The Dialogue builds on the work of multi-stakeholder working groups comprising representativesfrom a broad range of sectors including forest owners, industry, customers, the scientificcommunity, environmental groups and trade unions. Their work has been complemented by aseries of workshops involving specialists on a wide range of areas.
 
 2
This Stakeholder Dialogue provided an ideal opportunity for over one hundred and thirtystakeholders to participate in person to learn about and exchange views on forest certification inthe Asia-Pacific region and to share with us their opinions and suggestions on critical issuesconcerning the PEFC Standards revision process, including amongst others:
how to ensure balanced stakeholder representation and participation in developingnational standards,
how to deal with the concept of group certification, including meeting the requirements forparticipation covering size and type of forest area (natural forest or forest plantation) andforest ownership (state-owned or privately-owned),
structure of PEFC requirements for sustainable forest management,
ensuring basic labour, health and safety standards in all forestry operations, as well as
how to deal with the issue of forest conversion.Our continuing success in delivering certified sustainable forest management globally dependsupon stakeholder participation, and the resultant requirements will apply to over two thirds of the
world‟s certified forest area.
 The Dialogue concluded with a field visit to a PEFC/MTCS certified forest, and this enabledparticipants to appreciate the results of certified sustainable forest management in practice.The next Stakeholder Dialogue will be held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on 10 November and welook forward to welcoming you there.Yours sincerely,Ben Gunneberg Chew Lye TengSecretary General Chief Executive OfficerPEFC International Malaysian Timber Certification Council

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