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Dictums of Dr. Drake

Dictums of Dr. Drake

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Published by Doug Floyd
Here is a short piece telling the story of a professor I had in college. He enriched my life and hopefully this story will enrich yours. Hopefully, he may help you to remember a teacher that touched your life in a profound way.
Here is a short piece telling the story of a professor I had in college. He enriched my life and hopefully this story will enrich yours. Hopefully, he may help you to remember a teacher that touched your life in a profound way.

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Published by: Doug Floyd on Aug 11, 2010
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08/11/2010

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Dictums of Dr. Drake
by Doug FloydI stumbled into Dr. Drake
ʼ
s class kinda like the way Istumbled into college. While my friends were applying forgrants and scholarships, I was busy dreaming of somegreat venture, some great project, some greatsomething...or some great something else.Then suddenly I was there. Sitting at freshmanorientation for the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Ididn
ʼ
t worry too much about what to study. As my dadwould tell me, “What
ʼ
s important is that you finish whatyour start. Study anything you want just finish thedegree.”My dad had just returned from the 1980 Winter Olympicsin Lake Placid. At one point, he shared a helicopter ridewith Scott Hamilton
ʼ
s dad. Dr. Hamilton, a college professor, told my dad that “if a youngman is not sure what to study in school, he should learn how to communicate. If you canwrite and speak well, you can do about anything.”My dad passed on that advice. That sounded good enough for me, so I ended upstudying Creative Writing and Speech Communication at UT. Almost thirty years later Ican thank Dr. Hamilton for helping launch me on the adventure of learning to speak.Now where was I? Oh yes, stumbling into Dr. Drake
ʼ
s Advanced Creative Writing classwearing one black shoe and one red shoe. For some reason, two different coloredshoes made perfect sense in the 80s. As I sank down into my seat, I noticed that theman standing at the front of the class was wearing a linen suit. He looked and soundedlike he stepped right out of nineteenth century Southern aristocracy.Robert Young Drake Jr. stood before us as a living testimony of another time, anotherworld. An old Southern sophistication that was and is vanishing under concreteInterstates, concrete shopping malls and concrete lives. Listening to him talk was likesitting on a big porch during the late afternoon, sipping on lemonade and swappingstories.His slow drawl, devilish wit, and penchant for telling stories captivated us half-dazedstudents who stumbled toward degrees and possible oblivion. On the first day of class,he handed out no syllabi, no reading lists, and he gave no expectations for what wasahead.Someone raised his hand. “What
ʼ
s your policy on cutting class?”“I don
ʼ
t have a policy. Don
ʼ
t cut class.”
 
Another hand. Another question. “How do you figure our grades?”“Do what I say and you
ʼ
ll come through with flying colors.”One day he asked if anyone in the class had ever read Charles Dickens. I nodded yes.“What did you read Mr. Floyd?”“Well, I started
ʻ
Tale of Two Cities,
ʼ
but I didn
ʼ
t finish it.”“What? You didn
ʼ
t finish. Oh Mr. Floyd that is a grievous sin. You must go home andpray without ceasing.”Another day he read a story aloud, and asked us what was the main theme of the story.Someone shouted out, “Compassion.”“Oh my. I simply hate that word. The word compassion is so over used. I think peoplesay it when they don
ʼ
t really know what a story is about.”This was the first class I had ever attended where the professor diced our answers topieces and never hesitated to humiliate. Of course, he said everything with that slowdrawl and that slight grin.One student made the unfortunate mistake of cutting class. Next class he reappeared.“Well, Mr. Jones I see you
ʼ
ve decided to stay at the University after all. I assumed thatwhen you failed to come to class you had left for some pressing reason. But here youare in our midst once again.”Looking around to all the rest us he continued, “It amazes me that people will pay goodmoney for a University education and then fail to attend the classes. That makes nosense whatsoever.” After about five minutes of a public tongue lashing, he finallyreleased Mr. Jones from shaming and started the class.Some people would drop Dr. Drake
ʼ
s class but no one was bold enough to cut his class.For the next three months us stumbling students sat up wide awake with holy fear:never sure if we might be subject to a public trial on the spur of the moment. At thesame time, most of us loved this class and this professor. He spoke and taught andchallenged us in ways we
ʼ
d never been challenged.He mocked our simplistic assumptions and forced us to think and speak and writebetter. Sometimes he
ʼ
d say, “People ask me if I ever see talented writers in theseclasses. I reply that it
ʼ
s not a matter of talent. It
ʼ
s a matter of work, of discipline. A goodwriter writes and writes and writes.”
 
Then he might add, “Show me a great writer and I
ʼ
ll show you a great reader. If youwant to write, you must learn to read.”“The most important thing a parent can teach their child is how to read. I don
ʼ
t care if thechild reads comic books or Mad magazine. If the love of reading captures their soul,they
ʼ
ll read and read and read. And the reading will teach them to speak.”Religion showed in one person
ʼ
s story and Dr. Drake began discussing his own faith.“Of course, I believe in purgatory. I experience it every Sunday morning sitting on a hardwooden pew during the church service. After of lifetime of such suffering, God mustsurely allow me into heaven.”Another day, he decided to introduce grammar into our conversation. “There are norules.”“Write what
ʼ
s in your heart. Discover your voice. Grammar is your servant not yourmaster. It may help you say what you need to say more clearly, but never let it confineyou from saying what you must say.”He taught me that writing is not about fame, not about fortune. Most writers are poor.Writing is about finding and speaking my voice. It is the discipline of listening andspeaking and learning to articulate. He taught me to read.On the last day of class, he gave each of us a blessing. As he turned toward me hesaid, “Mr. Floyd, my hope and prayer for you is that one day by God
ʼ
s grace you
ʼ
llactually finish a Charles Dickens novel.” The class burst out laughing. I laughed.And in a strange twist of irony. One day I did read Dickens and fell in love with hiswords, his characters, his world. And I am always haunted by the cry for justice thatechoes all through Dickens.Dr. Drake died almost ten years ago. And sadly, I never expressed my deepappreciation for his influence on my life. It took years for me to even realize the deepand resounding impact of this thoughtful provocateur. Yet, I still find myself quoting himand listening to him and responding to him.I continue to write. I continue to read. I continue to learn.Dr. Drake freed me from the oppressive weight of wanting to be recognized. He freedme to a life of learning how to speak...how give voice to one moment in time..how todiscover that articulate word. As
Czeslaw Milosz once wrote,"To find my home in one sentence, concise, as if hammered in metal. Not to enchantanybody. Not to earn a lasting name in posterity. An unnamed need for order, for rhythm, for form, which three words are opposed to chaos and nothingness."

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