Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Bottling Our Cities’ Tap Water

Bottling Our Cities’ Tap Water

Ratings: (0)|Views: 4,423|Likes:
Industry data shows that over the past decade, an increasing share of the bottled water sold in the United States is coming from municipal water supplies. Categorized as “purified” by the bottled water industry, bottling companies purchase municipal tap water, put it through a filtration process, bottle it and then sell it back to consumers for hundreds to thousands of times the cost. Between 2000 and 2009, the share of water bottled with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sold in retail stores sourced by tap water supplies increased by almost 50 percent. During that time, tap water went from making up a third of retail PET bottled water sold in retail stores (32.7 percent) to making up almost half (47.8 percent) of it.
Industry data shows that over the past decade, an increasing share of the bottled water sold in the United States is coming from municipal water supplies. Categorized as “purified” by the bottled water industry, bottling companies purchase municipal tap water, put it through a filtration process, bottle it and then sell it back to consumers for hundreds to thousands of times the cost. Between 2000 and 2009, the share of water bottled with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sold in retail stores sourced by tap water supplies increased by almost 50 percent. During that time, tap water went from making up a third of retail PET bottled water sold in retail stores (32.7 percent) to making up almost half (47.8 percent) of it.

More info:

Published by: Food and Water Watch on Aug 11, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/12/2014

pdf

text

original

 
lion gallons in 2000 to 2.7 billion gallons in 2009.Although both sources of bottled water experienceddramatic growth, the amount of tap water bottledincreased at almost twice (1.89 times) the rate of spring water between 2000 and 2009.

The rapid increase in the bottling of tap water oc-curred in the latter part of the decade. Between2005 and 2009, the volume of tap water bottledgrew by 66 percent while the volume of spring wa-ter bottled increased by only 9 percent. Tap waterbottling expanded at more than seven times the rateof spring water bottling.
1
Why Is This Trend Occurring?

water than spring water or groundwater supplies. Companieshave faced resistance from communities over getting approvalto extract large quantities of spring water or groundwater for

-cated to account for future growth or for times of drought.The economic decline is also contributing to this trend. Elect-

this excess water to bottling companies. Furthermore, oncecities agree to provide tap water for bottling, companies oftendecide to build a water bottling plant, which they promise willcreate jobs and increase tax revenue, further addressing theeconomic problems facing municipalities across the country.The Beverage Marketing Corporation’s
Bottled Water in theUnited States
report also attributes part of the increase in tapwater being bottled to Nestlé Pure Life’s switch from springwater to tap water in 2005.
2
Since 2004, Nestlé Pure Life’ssales have increased by 320 percent.
3
Nestlé Waters NorthAmerica put most of its advertising eggs in the Nestlé PureLife basket, as the company increased expenditures on adver-tising for Nestlé Pure Life by 3,000 percent from $309,000in 2004 to $9.7 million in 2009. Between 2004 and 2009,Nestlé Waters North America spent more than twice as muchon advertising for Nestlé Pure Life than its leading springwater bottled water brand, Poland Spring.
4
Although PolandSpring continues to sell slightly more water than Nestlé PureLife, its sales declined by 6.4 percent in 2009, while NestléPure Life’s sales increased sales by 18 percent. Nestlé PureLife’s growth is notable, as the bottled water industry sales asa whole declined by 5.2 percent in 2009.
5
In 2009, the $9.7million in advertising for Nestlé Pure Life was more than threetimes the second-ranking brand of bottled water.
6
 
Case Studies
The following examples from cities across the country il-lustrate this larger trend on the local level, and why bottlingmunicipal tap water is an appealing option for Nestlé, whichoften meets local resistance to efforts to bottle spring water.
Sacramento, California
A perfect example of Nestlé’s move to bottle tap waterinstead of spring water occurred in California. In July 2009,Sacramento mayor Kevin Johnson announced that NestléWaters North America would be opening a new bottlingfacility in Sacramento, which would use 30 million gallonsof the city’s water for bottling, along with about 18.9 milliongallons of spring water from nearby sources.
7
The company

Pure Life brand. Two months after this announcement, Nestlédecided to withdraw its proposal to build a bottling plant inMcCloud, California, just north of San Francisco, where ithad planned to bottle 500 million gallons of spring water ayear.
8
This decision came after six years of resistance by theresidents of McCloud to the Nestlé proposal due to concernsabout the effects on local ecosystems, long-term water sup-plies and the quality of life in the rural area.

Activity (2)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->