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The Establishment of a Jewish National Home in Palestine

The Establishment of a Jewish National Home in Palestine

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Published by Sam Boustani
The prophets Isaiah (Isaiah 27:6, 701-681 BC) and Zechariah (Zechariah 8:7-8, 520-518 BC) foretold the return of the Jews to their homeland of Israel. The prophet Micah said that the Temple Mount in Jerusalem would become the world’s most important religious site (Micah 4:1, 750-686 BC). Prophecies concerning the establishment of a Jewish national home in Palestine that have been realized, or that are being realized, present far-reaching consequences.
The prophets Isaiah (Isaiah 27:6, 701-681 BC) and Zechariah (Zechariah 8:7-8, 520-518 BC) foretold the return of the Jews to their homeland of Israel. The prophet Micah said that the Temple Mount in Jerusalem would become the world’s most important religious site (Micah 4:1, 750-686 BC). Prophecies concerning the establishment of a Jewish national home in Palestine that have been realized, or that are being realized, present far-reaching consequences.

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Published by: Sam Boustani on Jun 24, 2008
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Boustani 1
The Establishment of a Jewish National Home in PalestineWassim Boustani, Assignment 1The Middle East (HIS-243414; Summer 2007)SUNY Empire State CollegeProfessor L. Sprankle17 June, 2007
 
Boustani 2
The Establishment of a Jewish National Home in PalestineThe prophets Isaiah (Isaiah 27:6, 701-681 BC) and Zechariah (Zechariah 8:7-8, 520-518BC) foretold the return of the Jews to their homeland of Israel. The prophet Micah said that theTemple Mount in Jerusalem would become the world’s most important religious site (Micah 4:1,750-686 BC). Prophecies concerning the establishment of a Jewish national home in Palestinethat have been realized, or that are being realized, present far-reaching consequences.Theologian Thomas Brightman (1562-1607) asks the question in a published work of whether the Jews shall return to Jerusalem; answering that nothing is more certain and the prophets confirm it. In 1649, the first of many petitions was dispatched to the Britishgovernment to lift the ban on Jewish settlers in England, and to assist their repatriation toPalestine. The British Consulate opened in Jerusalem in 1839, receiving countless requests toreturn Jews to Palestine (Collins and Ogilvie-Herald, 2003). These influential figures andimportant events started a historical movement that could not be stopped, and Britain would havea hand in most of it.By 1868, Jews had received official status in England. A famous Jew, Benjamin Disraeli(1804-1881), had become Prime Minister of England as Lord Beaconsfield. The first ZionistConference was held in 1897 shortly after the first Jewish colonizers entered Palestine. Tel Avivhad been founded in 1909, and Jewish immigrants had reached 100,000 by the start of WorldWar I in 1914. The Balfour Declaration was signed on November 2, 1917; the British had now publicly endorsed a Jewish home in Palestine (Collins and Ogilvie-Herald, 2003). The largenumber of Jews who settled in Palestine before any agreement was reached with Arabs ignited a political fire, and increased Britain’s involvement in their affairs.
 
Boustani 3
British troops took Jerusalem from the Ottoman Empire by the end of 1917. Arabsstarted asking questions regarding the Balfour Declaration, and signed an agreement with Zionistleaders at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, that the British fulfill promises of independence toArabs. The San Remo agreement, that Britain and France would establish mandates over MiddleEastern territories, is signed in 1920. The Draft Mandate for Palestine places the responsibilityon Britain to adopt the Balfour Declaration and establish a national home for Jews in Palestine(Collins and Ogilvie-Herald, 2003). Britain was now deeply involved, as Jewish settlersincreased and Arabs opposed agreements.The Jewish community continued growing, as new prayer restrictions at the Western Wallwere set by the Arabs in 1911. Jewish immigration was temporarily suspended after the 1920Easter riot in Jerusalem, and the more severe Jaffa riot of 1921. The British Mandate for Palestine was approved in 1922, securing the Jewish National Homeland while protecting therights of Palestinians. In 1923, Arab leaders organized an Arab Agency, as part of the Mandateand to overlook new developments. A British White Paper in 1928 attempted to calm the heatedsituation of the Western Wall in Jerusalem, but this solved little of the Jewish and Arab claims tothe Wall. By that time, Adolf Hitler had declared war on the Jewish people when publishingMein Kampf (“My Struggle”) in 1924 (Sicker, 2000). The trickling immigration to Palestinecould only have become a flood as the holocaust loomed in Germany.The Zionist Congress decided to enlarge the Jewish Agency and reinforced the right thatJews worship at the Western Wall. Rumors quickly spread through the Arab community that a plot against Muslim holy places was in play, increasing tensions and conflict in and out of Jerusalem. 1929 saw more severe Palestine riots with the massacre of 66 non-Zionist orthodoxJews (Morris, 2003). The riots resulted in the Passfield White Paper of 1930, which was

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