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Mysteries of Beekeeping

Mysteries of Beekeeping

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Published by: Nihilist on Aug 13, 2010
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08/16/2010

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BEE-KEEPING EXPLAINED:
BEING A COMPLETE
ANALYSIS OF THE WHOLE SUBJECT;
CONSISTING OF
THE NATURAL HISTORY OF BEES, DIRECTIONS FOR OBTAINING THE GREATESTAMOUNT OF PURE SURPLUS HONEY WITH THE LEAST POSSIBLEEXPENSE, REMEDIES FOR LOSSES GIVEN, AND THE SCIENCE OF"LUCK" FULLY ILLUSTRATED—THE RESULT OF MORETHAN TWENTY YEARS' EXPERIENCE INEXTENSIVE APIARIES.
BY M. QUINBY,
PRACTICAL BEE-KEEPER.NEW YORK:C. M. SAXTON, AGRICULTURAL BOOK PUBLISHER152 FULTON STREET. 1853.
Entered according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1853, byM. QUINBY,in the Clerk's Officeof the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York.E. O. JENKINS, PRINTER AND STEREOTYPER,114 NASSAU STREET, N. YORK.
CONTENTS.
CHAPTER I.BRIEF HISTORY.BEE-KEEPING EXPLAINED:1
 
Three kinds of Bees,9Queen described,9Description and Duty of Workers,10Description of Drones,11Most Brood in Spring,11Their Industry,12CHAPTER II.HIVES.Hives to be thoroughly made,13Different opinions about them,14The Author has no Patent to recommend,14Speculators supported long enough,15Prefix of Patent a bad recommendation,15Ignorance of affairs and committees,15Opposition to simplicity,16By gaining one point produce another evil,16First Delusion,17Chamber Hive,17Mrs. Griffith's Hive,18Weeks' Improvement,18Inclined Bottom-Boards do not throw out all the worms,19Objections to suspended hives,19See bees often,20Hall's Patent,21Jones's Patent,21An Experiment,21Reason of failure in dividing hive,22Cause of starving in such hives,23Advantages of the changeable hive considered,24Variation of these hives,25Expense in constructing changeable hives,25The surplus honey will contain bee-bread,26Description of Cutting's changeable hive,26First objection cost of construction,28Hives can be made with less expense,29Old breeding cells will last a long time,29Cells larger than necessary at first,30Expense of renewing combs,30Best to use old combs as long as they will last,31Method for Pruning when necessary,31Tools for Pruning,32Use of Tobacco Smoke,33Further objections to a sectional hive,34Non-Swarmers,35Contrast of profit,35Principle of swarming not understood,36Not to be depended upon,37Hives not always full before swarming,37Size of hives needed,37The Project Gutenberg eBook of Mysteries of Bee-Keeping Explained, by M. QuinbyE. O. JENKINS, PRINTER AND STEREOTYPER,114 NASSAU STREET, N. YORK.2
 
An Experiment,37Bees do not increase if full after the first year in same hive,38Gillmore's system doubted,39Utility of moth-proof hives doubted,39Instincts of the bee always the same,40Profit the object,41Common hive recommended,42Size Important,42Small hives most liable to accidents,42Apt to deceive,43Unprofitable if too large,43Correct size between two extremes,43Size for warm latitudes,44Larger hives more safe for long Winters or backward Spring,442,000 inches safe for this section,45Kind of Wood, width of Board, &c.,46Shape of little consequence,46Directions for making hives,47Size of cap and boxes,48Miner's Hive,48Directions for making holes,49A Suggestion,50Glass boxes preferred,51Glass boxeshow made,51Guide-combs necessary,52Wood Boxes,53Cover for Hives,54Jars and Tumblershow prepared,54Perfect Observatory Hive described,55One like Common Hive preferred,56What may be seen,56Directions for making Glass Hive,57Plate for Hive,61CHAPTER III.BREEDING.Imperfectly Understood,62Good stocks seldom without brood,63How small stocks commence,64Different with larger ones,65How Pollen is stored in the breeding season,65Operation of Laying, and the Eggs described,66Time from the Egg to the perfect Bee,67Rough treatment of the young Bee,67Guess-work,68Terms applied to young Bees,69Discrepancy in time in rearing brood as given by Huber,70The number of Eggs deposited by the Queen guessed at,71A test for the presence of a Queen,73When Drones are reared,74The Project Gutenberg eBook of Mysteries of Bee-Keeping Explained, by M. QuinbyE. O. JENKINS, PRINTER AND STEREOTYPER,114 NASSAU STREET, N. YORK.3

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