Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Energy Payback from Solar

Energy Payback from Solar

Ratings: (0)|Views: 85|Likes:
Published by Tom Cotter
MYTH: Solar devices require more energy to manufacture than they produce in their lifetime.

FACT: This study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conclusively demonstrates that energy payback for photovoltaic (PV) power is, in the worst case, less than 4 years. Given that PV module lifetimes are generally in excess of 20 years, a PV system will produce far more energy than it consumes over its lifetime.

Source: http://seia.org/cs/about_solar_energy/myths_and_facts
MYTH: Solar devices require more energy to manufacture than they produce in their lifetime.

FACT: This study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conclusively demonstrates that energy payback for photovoltaic (PV) power is, in the worst case, less than 4 years. Given that PV module lifetimes are generally in excess of 20 years, a PV system will produce far more energy than it consumes over its lifetime.

Source: http://seia.org/cs/about_solar_energy/myths_and_facts

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: Tom Cotter on Aug 16, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/24/2010

pdf

text

original

 
 Energy Payback: Clean Energy from PV 
Producing
electricity with photovoltaics (PV) emits no pollution, produces no greenhouse gases,and uses no finite fossil fuel resources. These are great environmental benefits, but just as we saythat it takes money to make money, it also
takes energy to save energy
. This concept is captured bythe term “energy payback,” or how long a PV system must operate to recover the energy—andassociated generation of pollution and CO
2
—that went into
making
the system in the first place.Energy payback estimates for rooftop PV systems boil down to 4, 3, 2, and 1 years: 4 years forsystems using current multicrystalline-silicon PV modules, 3 years for current thin-film modules,2 years for future multicrystalline modules, and 1 year for future thin-film modules. With energypaybacks of 1–4 years and assumed life expectancies of 30 years, 87% to 97% of the energy thatPV systems generate will be free of pollution, greenhouse gases, and depletion of resources. Let’stake a look at how the 4-3-2-1 paybacks were estimated for current and future PV systems.
What is the Payback for Crystalline-Silicon PV Systems?
q
 
Most solar cells and modules sold today are crystalline silicon. Both single-crystal andmulticrystalline silicon use large wafers of purified silicon. Purifying and crystallizing the siliconare the most energy-consumptive parts of the solar-cell manufacturing process. Other aspects ofsilicon cell and module processing that add to the energy input include: cutting the silicon intowafers, processing the wafers into cells, assembling the cells into modules (includingencapsulation), and overhead energy use for the manufacturing building.
q
 
Because today’s PV industry generallyrecrystallizes any of several types of “off-grade”silicon from the microelectronics industry, andbecause estimates for the energy used to purifyand crystallize silicon vary widely, energypayback calculations are not straightforward.Until the PV industry begins to make its ownsilicon—which it could do in the near future—key assumptions must be made to calculatepayback for crystalline PV.
q
 
To calculate payback, Dutch researcher ErikAlsema reviewed previous energy analyses anddid not “charge” for the energy that originallywent into crystalizing microelectronics scrap. His“best estimates” of energy used to make near-future,frameless PV were 600 kWh/m
2
for single-crystal-silicon modules and 420 kWh/m
2
for multicrystallinesilicon. Assuming 12% conversion efficiency (standardconditions) and 1700 kWh/m
2
per year of availablesunlight energy (the U.S. average is 1800), Alsemacalculated a payback of about
4 years
for currentmulticrystalline-silicon PV systems. Projecting 10years into the future, he assumes a “solar grade”silicon feedstock and 14% efficiency, dropping energypayback to about
2 years
.
q
 
Other recent calculations generally supportAlsema’s figures. Based on a solar-grade feedstock, Japanese researchers Kazuhiko Kato
et al.
calculated a multicrystalline payback of about 2 years (adjusted for the U.S solar resource). Palzand Zibetta also calculated energy payback of about 2 years for current multicrystalline siliconPV. For single-crystal silicon—which Alsema did not calculate—Kato calculated payback of 3years when he did not charge at all for off-grade feedstock.
 Reaping the environmental benefits of solar energy requires spending energy to make the PV system. But as this graphic shows, theinvestment is small. Assuming 30-year system life, PV-systems will provide a net  gain of 26 to 29 years of pollution-free and  greenhouse-gas-free electrical generation.
 
 Inaddition, Swiss researchers Dones and  Frischknecht found that the small green-house-gas emissions required to make PV systems are comparable to non-power-plant energy requirements for fossil-fuel electricitysuch as mining, transporting, and refining.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->