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Efficacy, Tolerability, and Safety of a Multicomponent Antiinflammatory With Glucosamine Hydrochloride vs Glucosamine Sulfate vs an NSAID in the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

Efficacy, Tolerability, and Safety of a Multicomponent Antiinflammatory With Glucosamine Hydrochloride vs Glucosamine Sulfate vs an NSAID in the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

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Purpose: Our purpose in this study was to compare the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of a multicomponent antiinflammatory preparation containing glucosamine hydrochloride (g hydrochloride) or plain glucosamine sulfate (g sulfate) with that of a non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID), aceclofenac, in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.
Methods: Forty-five patients with active osteoarthritis of the knee joint were randomized to receive g hydrochloride, g sulfate, or aceclofenac for 12 weeks. The patients were evaluated by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis-index scale, and bone-resorption assessment was done by measuring levels of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline from morning first-void urine samples of patients at baseline and at every 4-week interval until 4 weeks after drug discontinuation. Antero-posterior radiographs of affected knees were taken at baseline and after 12 weeks of therapy.
Results: In both the g hydrochloride- and g sulfate-treated groups, the pain, stiffness, and difficulty in performing daily activities showed significant improvement (PLimitations: The g sulfate dose was fully half that of g hydrochloride. As well, the g sulfate capsule did not contain boswellic acid, obtained from Boswellia serrata, and bromelain. Boswellia contains an impressive and extensive list of antiinflammatory compounds, and bromelain has a well-researched history as an antiinflammatory. Thus, it is unclear if the g sulfate results—which were not as good as the g hydrochloride results—show that the supplement itself was less effective or whether the lesser results simply resulted from a lesser dose of glucosamine and lack of other inclusive antiinflammatories.
Conclusion: The g hydrochloride- and g sulfate-treated groups were as efficacious and well tolerated as the NSAID-treated group in the management of active osteoarthritis over 12 weeks of treatment. Both glucosamine-treated groups showed slower onsets of action, but their effects persisted after stopping therapy, while the effect of aceclofenac became evident faster but waned rapidly after stopping the treatment.
Purpose: Our purpose in this study was to compare the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of a multicomponent antiinflammatory preparation containing glucosamine hydrochloride (g hydrochloride) or plain glucosamine sulfate (g sulfate) with that of a non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID), aceclofenac, in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.
Methods: Forty-five patients with active osteoarthritis of the knee joint were randomized to receive g hydrochloride, g sulfate, or aceclofenac for 12 weeks. The patients were evaluated by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis-index scale, and bone-resorption assessment was done by measuring levels of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline from morning first-void urine samples of patients at baseline and at every 4-week interval until 4 weeks after drug discontinuation. Antero-posterior radiographs of affected knees were taken at baseline and after 12 weeks of therapy.
Results: In both the g hydrochloride- and g sulfate-treated groups, the pain, stiffness, and difficulty in performing daily activities showed significant improvement (PLimitations: The g sulfate dose was fully half that of g hydrochloride. As well, the g sulfate capsule did not contain boswellic acid, obtained from Boswellia serrata, and bromelain. Boswellia contains an impressive and extensive list of antiinflammatory compounds, and bromelain has a well-researched history as an antiinflammatory. Thus, it is unclear if the g sulfate results—which were not as good as the g hydrochloride results—show that the supplement itself was less effective or whether the lesser results simply resulted from a lesser dose of glucosamine and lack of other inclusive antiinflammatories.
Conclusion: The g hydrochloride- and g sulfate-treated groups were as efficacious and well tolerated as the NSAID-treated group in the management of active osteoarthritis over 12 weeks of treatment. Both glucosamine-treated groups showed slower onsets of action, but their effects persisted after stopping therapy, while the effect of aceclofenac became evident faster but waned rapidly after stopping the treatment.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: InnoVision Health Media on Aug 17, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial
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04/23/2013

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