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Table Of Contents

STRUCTURE OF THE BOOK
WHAT IS THE SANTA FE INSTITUTE?
ESTABLISHING ETHOS WITH AN “INITIAL IMPRESSIONS” REPORT
RHETORIC AT THE SFI: A QUALIFIED ACCEPTANCE
THE MEANING OF METAPHOR
METAPHORS IN MOTION: HOW THEY WORK
METAPHOR AND SCIENCE
FEAR OF PERSUASION AND METAPHORIC HARMONICS
RHETORICAL ALTERNATIVES TO METAPHOR IN SCIENCE
THE METAPHORS OF INFORMATION AS THE NEW MATERIALITY
REPRESENTING REALITY
PLATONIC ARGUMENTS FOR THE SUPREMACY OF MATHEMATICS
METAPHOR FOR UNDERSTANDING A NON-ALGORITHMIC WORLD
MAKING SLOPPY IDEAS RIGOROUS
NO RATIONAL METHOD OF HAVING GOOD IDEAS
METAPHOR HARMONICS: WHO INTENDS THE BEE TO BE YELLOW?
EQUILIBRIUM AND THE PRISONER’S DILEMMA
STYLE AND ELOQUENCE IN SFI WRITING
INCOMMENSURABILITY: TRYING TO CROSS DISCIPLINES
THE WORD “COMPLEX” IN THE OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY
“COMPLEXITY” ARRIVES IN SANTA FE
THE NEW “COMPLEXITY” RETURNS TO OLD HAUNTS
IS “COMPLEXITY” A METAPHOR?
SPEAK CAREFULLY AND CARRY A PARADIGM SHIFT
Works Cited
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Metaphor and Knowledge the Challenges of Writing Science

Metaphor and Knowledge the Challenges of Writing Science

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Published by urbanom
As a scholar of language, I knew I was onto
something when I watched political scientist
Elinor Ostrom speak before a group of scientists at the Santa Fe
Institute in the summer of 1999. The scientists sat at a horseshoeshaped
table, eyes glancing back and forth from Ostrom to her slide
presentation at the front of the room. Outside, cumulus clouds were
visible as they puffed up into the deep blue sky over the valley below
the Institute, a remodeled adobe ranch house. Scientists of various
ages and areas of expertise sat alertly and listened as Ostrom explained
her research with students at Indiana University. The students had
been issued tokens worth money and asked to allocate those tokens
among the group. Ostrom’s research was grounded in game theoretical
economics, which mimics real-world situations by requiring subjects
in a group to make individual choices based upon perceived rewards.
Ostrom concluded from her experiments that public policy issues—
such as how to allocate ground water among farmers—should not be
decided solely by a centralized governing body. Allowing the farmers
to organize into smaller cooperatives to decide irrigation rights and
rules is an effective alternative, she concluded, noting that, “Rules
become the tools that humans use for self-organization.”
Yet, when it came time for the question and answer portion of
her talk, Ostrom found that much of the discussion did not focus
directly on her recommendations, but was given over to a spirited
debate about what the word “rules” meant to her model. For biologists,
“rules” suggest regular observable behavior in an organism,
Ostrom explained later. For example, a species of fish that always
As a scholar of language, I knew I was onto
something when I watched political scientist
Elinor Ostrom speak before a group of scientists at the Santa Fe
Institute in the summer of 1999. The scientists sat at a horseshoeshaped
table, eyes glancing back and forth from Ostrom to her slide
presentation at the front of the room. Outside, cumulus clouds were
visible as they puffed up into the deep blue sky over the valley below
the Institute, a remodeled adobe ranch house. Scientists of various
ages and areas of expertise sat alertly and listened as Ostrom explained
her research with students at Indiana University. The students had
been issued tokens worth money and asked to allocate those tokens
among the group. Ostrom’s research was grounded in game theoretical
economics, which mimics real-world situations by requiring subjects
in a group to make individual choices based upon perceived rewards.
Ostrom concluded from her experiments that public policy issues—
such as how to allocate ground water among farmers—should not be
decided solely by a centralized governing body. Allowing the farmers
to organize into smaller cooperatives to decide irrigation rights and
rules is an effective alternative, she concluded, noting that, “Rules
become the tools that humans use for self-organization.”
Yet, when it came time for the question and answer portion of
her talk, Ostrom found that much of the discussion did not focus
directly on her recommendations, but was given over to a spirited
debate about what the word “rules” meant to her model. For biologists,
“rules” suggest regular observable behavior in an organism,
Ostrom explained later. For example, a species of fish that always

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Published by: urbanom on Aug 19, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/28/2013

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