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Richmond Review Aug14-10

Richmond Review Aug14-10

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Published by Richmond Review
Print edition of the Aug. 14, 2010 Richmond Review.
Print edition of the Aug. 14, 2010 Richmond Review.

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Published by: Richmond Review on Aug 19, 2010
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ESTABLISHED 1932 SATURDAY, AUGUST 14, 2010 28 PAGES 
Oval
Sport & FitnessFall Programs
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nd out how I  consistently sell homes faster  for the best price!
 NEWS@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM OFFICE: 604-247-3700 DELIVERY: 604-247-3710 CLASSIFIED: 604-575-5555 NEWSROOM: 604-247-3730 
richmondreview.com
REVIEW 
therichmond
Richmond Maritime Festival
Local resident  surprised to seetrees chopped, city  says they were in poor health
by Rebekah Hammond
Contributor 
Steveston residents can be assured
the 11 trees removed by developersnear where the Army and Navy Club
used to be will be replaced.
Steve Kovacs was enjoying his usual
walk along No. 1 Road near Chatham
with his dog on Tuesday when henoticed the 11 trees had been cut
down.“They were quite old and quite bigand they had them all blocked off for
construction,” said Kovacs. “Now Inoticed they were ripped down and
was curious to know why.”
Other people passing by were also
surprised.
“I talked to other people in thestreet, mentioning how [the trees]were blocked off and then taken
down,” said Kovacs.
“They were shocked too and couldn’t
believe the cherry trees were gone.”
The trees behind Steveston Parkwere slated for removal by the de-velopers at 11900 No. 1 Road. Theyare building a seniors care facilityand a hall in the lot, according toCity of Richmond spokesperson Ted
Townsend.
“The trees were all determined tobe in poor health,” Townsend said.
“With the development, the grade [of 
the land] will be changed significantly
and it was found that the trees would
be adversely affected by changes in
the water table and grade.”
In keeping with the city’s tree by-law, the developer is required topay compensation and new treeswill be planted, “space permitting,”
Townsend said.
The tree-shaded sidewalks of Ste-
veston make the area a popular place
for walking.
“Down in Steveston, you know, we
like our trees,” Kovacs said. “I always
walk with my dog through there.”
Rebekah Hammond photo
Steve Kovacs was surprised to see a row of old trees, which had been protected from a construction project, suddenly removed.
Steveston trees will be replaced
Dog stolenfrom family’sbackyard
Reward offered for missing Rottweiler 
by Jessica Tieszen
Contributor 
Police are on the lookout for Maxx, an 11-month-old Rott-weiler puppy whowas stolen froman East Richmond
home.
The dog wasstolen from thehome July 9, butRichmond RCMPissued a press
release this week
looking for in-formation in the
theft.
Maxx is de-scribed as being
of average heightand build, mostly
black with a mix of brown colour-ing and has aclipped tail. He
answers to his name and was wearing a black leather col-lar with metal studs and spikes.The dog’s owners told
The Review 
that Maxx is a young,lovable, friendly dog that is a big part of the family. Withthree young children, R. Sanghera bought the dog to pro-tect the kids and serve as a companion.On July 9, while R. Sanghera was away on vacation withhis wife, the dog was stolen from his acreage in the 11000
block of Bird Road. A surveillance camera set up in thebackyard captured two female suspects removing Maxx 
from his chain-linked dog house, taking him away in a sil-ver Dodge Caravan.One suspect is described as a tall, skinny, blonde-hairedfemale, the other, a heavy-set brunette. No further infor-mation has been released.
See Page 5
Maxx was stolen from a Richmondhome on July 9.
 
Page A2 The Richmond Review Saturday, August 14, 2010
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Saturday, August 14, 2010 The Richmond Review Page A3
Commercial fishermen pullingin good catches
by Jeff Nagel
Black Press
The sound of nets being ratcheted outof the Fraser River and big healthy salmonflopping into boats was music to the ears of commercial fishermen Tuesday.After four years of being sidelined becauseof insufficient stocks, gillnetters took to thewater to harvest sockeye in the lower river.By all accounts, fishing was good with eachboat hauling in an average of 250 sockeyedespite challenging tides and being limitedto just a three-hour opening.“It’s always a happy moment to be out onthe boat fishing,” said B.C. Fisheries SurvivalCoalition spokesman Phil Eidsvik from hisboat off Surrey near Barnston Island.“There’s more than we expected this farup.”Recreational anglers and First Nations fish-ermen have also been eagerly pulling sock-eye from the river, as have seiners and troll-ers further offshore.“The catches are good and people arefishing hard,” Sto:lo fisheries adviser ErnieCrey said.There are growing hopes the catch com-ing in isn’t just a flash in the pan but willcontinue through September, when millionsmore sockeye are still due to arrive.Up to 11 million sockeye were forecast thisyear, but fishermen hardly dared think aboutthat number, after similar optimistic projec-tions fell way short three years running.“We’re just hopeful this is the beginning of some kind of a turnaround here,” said IrvinFigg, president of the United Fishermen andAllied Workers Union.He said gillnetters are disappointed thatafter not having fished since 2006 they’vegot only a brief opening so far.“Some people are insulted by that. I don’tblame them,” he said, but added he’s gladfederal fisheries managers at least didn’twait until most of the run had passed beforegiving the green light.Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) areamanager Barry Rosenberger said the earlysummer run is currently estimated at 1.6 mil-lion fish, about twice as many as had beenprojected.It’s too early for in-season estimates of the later stocks, but DFO projected a further2.6 million summer-run and 8.2 million late-summer-run sockeye would return to theFraser.“We’re trying to take a precautionaryapproach as we move our way through this,”Rosenberger said.According to Pacific Salmon Commissionestimates, just over one million sockeyehave been caught as of Wednesday, with theCanadian commercial fleet taking 359,000,U.S. commercial boats taking 298,000 andFirst Nations on the Fraser taking 234,000.The balance includes test fishing, recreation-al and marine-area aboriginal catches.George Heras, president of Ladner-basedSeven Seas Fish Co., said processors arescrambling to handle the incoming sockeyeafter becoming accustomed to years of anon-existant Fraser fishery.The harvest comes as the federally appoint-ed Cohen Commission on the decline of Fraser sockeye conducts field tours ahead of public hearings slated to begin this fall.Some observers worry DFO is not exercis-ing enough caution. Just because enough sockeye show up andmake it past the nets and rods on the lowerFraser doesn’t mean enough will survivethe long trip upriver to spawn in their birthstreams.“The Fraser is warmer than usual this year,”SFU fisheries biologist John Reynolds said.“It’s getting to the critical temperaturethreshold where the fish can actually diebefore they get a chance to spawn becausethey’re not adapted to these warm tempera-tures.”The provincial government also warned thisweek drought conditions and near-recordlow stream flows in much of northern B.C.could put fish stocks at risk.
Evan Seal photo
Commercial fishing boat deckhands Linda Roon, Janice Wheeler and Sandra Pinette sort through their haul of sockeye salmon on the Fraser River.
Sockeye run a happy fish tale so far
Evan Seal photo
Processors are scrambling to handle the incoming sockeye after becoming accustomed to years of a non-existant Fraser fishery.

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