Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
6Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Snapshot Aesthetics

Snapshot Aesthetics

Ratings:

4.5

(2)
|Views: 6,649|Likes:
Published by Jonathan Schroeder
The snapshot, a straightforward, generally unposed photograph of everyday life, has
emerged as an important style in contemporary strategic communication. Many recent ads
portray models in classic snapshot poses—out of focus, eyes closed, poorly framed—in
contrast to more traditional and historical patterns of formal studio shots or highly posed
tableaux. Companies such as Volkswagen, IKEA, American Apparel, Ford Motor Company,
Apple, and Coca-Cola present snapshot-like images in their print, television, and Internet
communications. These snapshots often appear less formal, more everyday or “real”—more
“authentic”. “Intentional” snapshots are often characterized by “disruptions” in formal photographic traditions – off lighting, poor focus, blurred images, awkward poses,
harsh shadows, etc. In this paper, I discuss the role of snapshot aesthetics in contemporary brand communication.
The snapshot, a straightforward, generally unposed photograph of everyday life, has
emerged as an important style in contemporary strategic communication. Many recent ads
portray models in classic snapshot poses—out of focus, eyes closed, poorly framed—in
contrast to more traditional and historical patterns of formal studio shots or highly posed
tableaux. Companies such as Volkswagen, IKEA, American Apparel, Ford Motor Company,
Apple, and Coca-Cola present snapshot-like images in their print, television, and Internet
communications. These snapshots often appear less formal, more everyday or “real”—more
“authentic”. “Intentional” snapshots are often characterized by “disruptions” in formal photographic traditions – off lighting, poor focus, blurred images, awkward poses,
harsh shadows, etc. In this paper, I discuss the role of snapshot aesthetics in contemporary brand communication.

More info:

Published by: Jonathan Schroeder on Jun 26, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/29/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Snapshot Aesthetics in Brand CultureJonathan E. SchroederUniversity of Exeter j.e.schroeder@exeter.ac.uk 
 International Network of Visual Studies in OrganizationsThe Photographers GalleryOctober 14, 2008
 
Snapshot Aesthetics in Brand CultureThis paper analyzes the use of snapshots or snapshot-like imagery as an importantstrategic resource for marketing communication. First, snapshot like images appear 
authentic,
as if they are beyond the artificially constructed world of typical advertising photography.This visual quality can be harnessed to promote brands as authentic, to invoke the “averageconsumer” as a credible product endorser, and to demonstrate how the brand might fit in withthe regular consumer’s lifestyle. Second, snapshot aesthetics supports a
casual 
image of  brands, particularly consumer lifestyle brands. Many brands appeal to less formalconsumption—from family dinners to online financial management. Popular fashion brands,in particular, court casual images for their brands and sub-brands by deploying snapshot-like photographs in high profile branding campaigns for their everyday clothing lines. In this way, photographic style helps articulate market segmentation strategy. I argue that the snapshotaesthetic embodies the experience economy by showing consumers in the midst of seeminglyreal, sometimes exciting, but often mundane experiences. In this way, we can think aboutsnapshot aesthetics as an important visual aspect of documenting, marketing andunderstanding consumer experience.
 
Introductory Example: YSLThe iconic French fashion house Yves Saint Laurent’s current campaigns feature oddimages of models barely recognizable as luxury brand advertising. For example, one adshows a man draped over an industrial railing in a nondescript staircase. He leans over therailing, almost appearing as if falling down, or walking off balance. His hair covers his eyes.His leg sticks out from his body in a strange way. The photograph itself is harshly lit, far from the typical sumptuous studio portrait that YSL usually employs. Why has YSL chosenthis snapshot-like image for their visual brand strategy? What strategic role does this style play in contemporary marketing communication?

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->