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Self Analysis

Self Analysis

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Published by: electronsandprint on Aug 23, 2010
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04/11/2014

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Self-Analysis
KAREN HORNEY, M. D.
 
CONTENTS
 Introduction
7I
Feasibility and Desirability of Self-Analysis
13II
The Driving Forces in Neuroses
37III
Stages of Psychoanalytic Understanding
73Iv
The Patient's Share in the Psychoanalytic
Process
101
v
The Analyst's Share in the PsychoanalyticProcess
123vI
Occasional Self-Analysis
151VII
Systematic Self-Analysis: Preliminaries
174
VIII
Systematic Self-Analysis of a Morbid  Dependency
190Ix
Spirit and Rules of Systematic Self-Analysis
247x
Dealing with Resistances
267xI
Limitations of Self-Analysis
286
 Index
305
 
INTRODUCTION
Psychoanalysis first developed as a method of therapy inthe strict medical sense. Freud had discovered that cer-tain circumscribed disorders that have no discernibleorganic basis—such as hysterical convulsions, phobias,depressions, drug addictions, functional stomach upsets—can be cured by uncovering the unconscious factorsthat underlie them. In the course of time disturbancesof this kind were summarily called neurotic.After a while—within the last thirty years—psychi-atrists realized that neurotic people not only suffer fromthese manifest symptoms but also are considerably dis-turbed in all their dealings with life. And they also recog-nized the fact that many people have personality dis-orders without showing any of the definite symptomsthat had previously been regarded as characteristic of neuroses. In other words, it gradually became more ap-parent that in neuroses symptoms may or may not bepresent but personality difficulties are never lacking. Theconclusion was thus inevitable that these less specificdifficulties constitute the essential core of neuroses.The recognition of this fact was exceedingly construc-tive in the development of psychoanalytical science, notonly increasing its efficacy but also enlarging its scope.
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