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Liturgical (and Royal) Colours

Liturgical (and Royal) Colours

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Published by jwr47
Although the Book Exodus defines blue as a divine prescription for the Hebrew High Priests' garments and curtains at the Covenant Tent the symbol blue (and equally yellow) have been avoided as standard liturgical colors, probably resulting from the idea of avoiding any evil influence from the altar.

In contrast to the ancient biblical adoration for blue symbolism medieval traditions generally symbolize evil by blue (Eve's colour) and yellow (for traitors and evil women). Therefore the evil colour blue as a religious symbol originally had to be abandoned from the Church's holy locations such as the altar.

With a growing adoration for the Virgin Mary the Church however had to develop a minor acceptance for the colour blue as a female symbol, which originally has been restricted for paintings and sculptures. The cardinals' garments and coat of arms are still restricted to the divine colour red.

As the popes and the cardinals the kings and the emperors used to consider themselves as a representative of the divine powers. Early emperors and kings had been elected by their soldiers as the most powerful leaders of the clans. In order to avoid negative biblical symbolism and as male persons they may have preferred red as well as their symbolic colour.

In contrast in later eras the kings en emperors decided to inherit their divine ancestry instead of being elected by the people or the Popes. This may have caused some problems in accepting the female colour blue as a negative symbol in the royal families. The female members may simply have protested against the idea of being the cause for all evil.

As a result of these protests the colour blue stopped horrifying the non-clerical classes in the Middle Age. Notably the late-medieval royals and emperors accepted blue in their early coats of arms, graves, flags and garments. This allowed the royals to dress themselves in red & blue as representatives of a male and female created people as a symmetrically created divine image of God.

In contrast the Church still avoids blue as a standard liturgical colour in Masses and in the garments for the highest ranks of the clerical staff.
Although the Book Exodus defines blue as a divine prescription for the Hebrew High Priests' garments and curtains at the Covenant Tent the symbol blue (and equally yellow) have been avoided as standard liturgical colors, probably resulting from the idea of avoiding any evil influence from the altar.

In contrast to the ancient biblical adoration for blue symbolism medieval traditions generally symbolize evil by blue (Eve's colour) and yellow (for traitors and evil women). Therefore the evil colour blue as a religious symbol originally had to be abandoned from the Church's holy locations such as the altar.

With a growing adoration for the Virgin Mary the Church however had to develop a minor acceptance for the colour blue as a female symbol, which originally has been restricted for paintings and sculptures. The cardinals' garments and coat of arms are still restricted to the divine colour red.

As the popes and the cardinals the kings and the emperors used to consider themselves as a representative of the divine powers. Early emperors and kings had been elected by their soldiers as the most powerful leaders of the clans. In order to avoid negative biblical symbolism and as male persons they may have preferred red as well as their symbolic colour.

In contrast in later eras the kings en emperors decided to inherit their divine ancestry instead of being elected by the people or the Popes. This may have caused some problems in accepting the female colour blue as a negative symbol in the royal families. The female members may simply have protested against the idea of being the cause for all evil.

As a result of these protests the colour blue stopped horrifying the non-clerical classes in the Middle Age. Notably the late-medieval royals and emperors accepted blue in their early coats of arms, graves, flags and garments. This allowed the royals to dress themselves in red & blue as representatives of a male and female created people as a symmetrically created divine image of God.

In contrast the Church still avoids blue as a standard liturgical colour in Masses and in the garments for the highest ranks of the clerical staff.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: jwr47 on Aug 25, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/26/2013

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Liturgical colours
 by J.W. Richter Design: Pietro Siffi. published in Wikipedia's Wikimedia Commons(
. )
 
 Fig. 1: A Roman chasuble
 
Summary
Although the Book Exodus defines blue as a divine prescription for the Hebrew High Priests' garments and curtainsat the Covenant Tent the symbol
blue
(and equally
 yellow
)have been avoided as standard liturgical colours, probablyresulting from the idea of avoiding any evil influence from thealtar.In contrast to the ancient biblical adoration for 
blue
symbolismmedieval traditions generally symbolize evil by blue (
 Eve'scolour 
) and yellow (for 
traitors
and
evil women
). Therefore theevil colour 
blue
as a religious symbol originally had to beabandoned from the Church's holy locations such as the altar.With a growing adoration for the Virgin Mary the Churchhowever had to develop a minor acceptance for the colour blueas a female symbol, which originally has been restricted for  paintings and sculptures. The cardinals' garments and coat of arms are still restricted to the divine colour 
re
.As the popes and the cardinals the kings and the emperors usedto consider themselves as a representative of the divine powers.Early emperors and kings had been elected by their soldiers asthe most powerful leaders of the clans. In order to avoidnegative biblical symbolism and as male persons they mayhave preferred
red 
as well as their symbolic colour.In contrast in later eras the kings en emperors decided to inherittheir divine ancestry instead of being elected by the people or the Popes. This may have caused some problems in acceptingthe female colou
blue
as a negative symbol in the royalfamilies. The female members may simply have protestedagainst the idea of being the cause for all evil.2
 
As a result of these protests the colour blue stopped horrifyingthe non-clerical classes in the Middle Age. Notably the late-medieval royals and emperors accepted blue in their early coatsof arms, graves, flags and garments. This allowed the royals todress themselves in red & blue as representatives of a male andfemale created people as a symmetrically created divine imageof God.In contrast the Church still avoids blue as a standard liturgicalcolour in Masses and in the garments for the highest ranks of the clerical staff.3

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