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Future of Making

Future of Making

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Published by Sean Ness
On May 3 and 4, 2008, more than 75,000 people from all over the country descended on a fairground in Silicon Valley to see a glimpse of the future through a lens on the present. This was the annual Bay Area Maker Faire, a celebration of do-it-yourself culture where more than 500 “makers” showed off their robot pets, home-brewed 3D displays, biofuel-powered vehicles, and extreme crafts.

The event is a science fair meets craft fair meets farmer’s market. Yet, Maker Faire is not just about seeing great DIY projects. It’s about breaking established modes of thinking and questioning traditional approaches to living, working, and organizing. In Institute for the Future (IFTF) terms, Maker Faire is ripe with weak signals that point toward the way technology may be used, or made, over the next decade. Two future forces, one mostly social, one mostly technological, are intersecting to transform how goods, services, and experiences—the “stuff” of our world—will be designed, manufactured, and distributed over the next decade
On May 3 and 4, 2008, more than 75,000 people from all over the country descended on a fairground in Silicon Valley to see a glimpse of the future through a lens on the present. This was the annual Bay Area Maker Faire, a celebration of do-it-yourself culture where more than 500 “makers” showed off their robot pets, home-brewed 3D displays, biofuel-powered vehicles, and extreme crafts.

The event is a science fair meets craft fair meets farmer’s market. Yet, Maker Faire is not just about seeing great DIY projects. It’s about breaking established modes of thinking and questioning traditional approaches to living, working, and organizing. In Institute for the Future (IFTF) terms, Maker Faire is ripe with weak signals that point toward the way technology may be used, or made, over the next decade. Two future forces, one mostly social, one mostly technological, are intersecting to transform how goods, services, and experiences—the “stuff” of our world—will be designed, manufactured, and distributed over the next decade

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Published by: Sean Ness on Aug 26, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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09/03/2010

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Tchology Hoizos Pogam
124 University Avenue, 2nd FloorPalo Alto, CA 94301 > 650.854.6322 >
www.iftf.og
 
©2008 Institute for the Future. All rights reserved. This report is proprietary forTechnology Horizons Program members. Reproduction prohibited without written permission.
about th …
Technology horizons Program
The Technology Horizons Program combines a deep understanding of technology and societalforces to identify and evaluate discontinuities and innovations in the next three to ten years.We help organizations develop insights and strategic tools to better position themselves for thefuture. Our approach to technology forecasting is unique—we put humans in the middle of ourforecasts. Understanding humans as consumers, workers, householders, and community mem-bers allows IFTF to help companies look beyond technical feasibility to identify the value in newtechnologies, forecast adoption and diffusion patterns, and discover new market opportunitiesand threats. For more information about the Technology Horizons Program, contact Sean Nessat sness@iftf.org, (650) 233-9517.
insTiTuTe for The fuTure
The Institute for the Future is an independent, nonprot strategic research group with morethan 40 years of forecasting experience. The core of our work is identifying emerging trends anddiscontinuities that will transform global society and the global marketplace. We provide ourmembers with insights into business strategy, design process, innovation, and social dilemmas. Ourresearch generates the foresight needed to create insights that lead to action. Our research spansa broad territory of deeply transformative trends, from health and health care to technology, theworkplace, and human identity. The Institute for the Future is located in Palo Alto, California.
auThor:
David Pescovitz
ediTor:
Jess Hemerly
Peer reviewers: 
Marina Gorbis, Alex Pang, Anthony Townsend
ProducTion ediTor: 
Lisa Mumbach
designers: 
Karin Lubeck, Yeshai Lang
 
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insTiTuTe for The fuTure
 
The fuTure of maKing:
THE WAY THINGS ARE MADE IS BEING REMADE
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