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Annual Call Center Expo 2010 Notes

Annual Call Center Expo 2010 Notes

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01/13/2012

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Annual Call Center Expo 2010
Annual
 
Call
 
Center
 
Expo
 
is
 
an
 
ICMI
 
event
 
that
 
was
 
held
 
June
 
14
17,
 
2010
 
in
 
New
 
Orleans.
 
Call
 
center
 
professionals
 
come
 
to
 
ACCE
 
to
 
discover
 
how
 
to
 
improve
 
their
 
center’s
 
performance
 
by
 
better
 
managing
 
people
 
and
 
resources,
 
improving
 
operations,
 
properly
 
selecting
 
and
 
implementing
 
technology,
 
and
 
more.
 
This
 
conference
 
brief 
 
summarizes
 
key
 
points
 
of 
 
the
 
conference
 
and
 
shares
 
specific
 
session
 
notes
 
for
 
those
 
attended.
 
Opening
 
Remarks
 
Brad
 
Cleveland
 
opened
 
the
 
conference
 
and
 
shared
 
some
 
demographics
 
of 
 
attendees.
 
The
 
highest
 
industry
 
representation
 
was
 
Financial
 
Services,
 
which
 
made
 
up
 
twenty
 
percent
 
of 
 
the
 
attendees.
 
Computers
 
and
 
Telecom
 
came
 
in
 
next
 
with
 
twelve
 
percent
 
of 
 
attendees.
 
Most
 
of 
 
the
 
call
 
centers
 
represented
 
at
 
the
 
conference
 
had
 
twenty
 
agents
 
or
 
fewer.
 
Twenty
three
 
percent
 
of 
 
attendees
 
had
 
a
 
role
 
of 
 
Services,
 
Supervisor,
 
or
 
Manager.
 
A
 
similar
 
sector
 
at
 
twenty
two
 
percent
 
was
 
comprised
 
of 
 
Executive
 
Vice
 
Presidents,
 
Vice
 
Presidents,
 
and
 
Directors.
 
Almost
 
half 
 
of 
 
all
 
attendees
 
have
 
been
 
in
 
the
 
call
 
center
 
industry
 
ten
 
or
 
more
 
years.
 
Many
 
in
 
attendance
 
indicated
 
that
 
they
 
had
 
major
 
customer
 
experience
 
initiatives.
 
Currently,
 
top
 
challenges
 
include
 
changes
 
in
 
external
 
and
 
internal
 
environment,
 
meeting
 
customer
 
expectations,
 
as
 
well
 
as
 
direction,
 
planning,
 
operations.
 
Informal
 
conversations
 
often
 
turned
 
to
 
discussions
 
of 
 
the
 
challenges
 
of 
 
new
 
channels
 
being
 
supported,
 
such
 
as
 
live
 
chat.
 
The
 
skills
 
and
 
training
 
for
 
the
 
channels
 
is
 
challenging
 
as
 
well
 
as
 
reporting,
 
scheduling,
 
monitoring,
 
etc.
 
Opening
 
Keynote
 
John
 
Foley,
 
High
 
Performance
 
Climb
 
 John
 
acted 
 
in
 
the
 
movie
 
Top
 
Gun,
 
is
 
a
 
 jet 
 
 pilot,
 
and 
 
was
 
a
 
member 
 
of 
 
the
 
Blue
 
 Angels
 
– 
 
an
 
elite
 
exhibition
 
team
 
 for 
 
naval 
 
aviation.
 
He
 
is
 
now 
 
a
 
 performance
 
consultant.
 
John
 
discussed
 
the
 
critical
 
thinking
 
and
 
processes
 
required
 
to
 
achieve
 
high
 
performance
 
in
 
an
 
environment
 
requiring
 
high
 
precision.
 
With
 
merely
 
three
 
feet
 
between
 
planes
 
in
 
formation
 
 –
 
a
 
space
 
that
 
is
 
narrower
 
than
 
your
 
head
 
to
 
your
 
feet
 
when
 
sitting
 
 –
 
John
 
knows
 
the
 
importance
 
of 
 
performance.
 
As
 
one
 
of 
 
only
 
six
 
people
 
in
 
the
 
world
 
at
 
one
 
time
 
to
 
be
 
a
 
demo
 
pilot,
 
John
 
is
 
familiar
 
with
 
behaviors
 
of 
 
the
 
top
 
one
tenth
 
of 
 
one
 
percent
 
of 
 
the
 
performance
 
pyramid.
 
The
 
Blue
 
Angels
 
program
 
has
 
fifty
 
percent
 
turnover
 
in
 
its
 
top
 
echelon,
 
which
 
is
 
a
 
planned
 
rotation
 
of 
 
demo
 
pilots.
 
To
 
support
 
excellence,
 
the
 
group
 
requires
 
consistent
 
processes
 
and
 
procedures.
 
A
 
new
 
member
 
of 
 
the
 
Blue
 
Angels
 
undertakes
 
intense
 
training
 
in
 
becoming
 
a
 
fully
 
trained
 
demo
 
pilot
 
as
 
the
 
program
 
sustains
 
300%
 
improvement
 
in
 
three
 
months.
 
John
 
asserts
 
that
 
elevating
 
your
 
belief 
 
level
 
in
 
turn
 
elevates
 
performance.
 
The
 
first
 
level
 
of 
 
belief 
 
includes
 
vision
 
and
 
clarity.
 
Is
 
the
 
vision
 
liberating
 
or
 
limiting?
 
Limiting
 
is
 
from
 
without.
 
Liberating
 
is
 
from
 
within.
 
When
 
a
 
 
 
Annual Call Center Expo 2010
new
 
entrant
 
comes
 
to
 
the
 
program
 
they
 
have
 
six
 
weeks
 
to
 
watch,
 
learn
 
and
 
absorb
 
the
 
culture.
 
They
 
are
 
exposed
 
to
 
a
 
liberating
 
vision,
 
and
 
their
 
belief 
 
level
 
increases.
 
From
 
there,
 
the
 
second
 
level
 
is
 
brief 
 
which
 
is
 
comprised
 
of 
 
planning,
 
focus,
 
and
 
communication.
 
Completing
 
these
 
steps
 
is
 
the
 
only
 
way
 
to
 
make
 
sure
 
to
 
achieve
 
excellence
 
every
 
time.
 
Blue
 
Angels
 
are
 
briefed
 
before
 
flights,
 
and
 
they
 
hear
 
and
 
visualize
 
their
 
maneuvers
 
from
 
their
 
leader.
 
The
 
same
 
instructions
 
are
 
delivered
 
in
 
the
 
same
 
measured
 
cadence
 
during
 
flight.
 
Thirdly,
 
in
 
the
 
increasing
 
levels
 
of 
 
belief,
 
a
 
team
 
establishes
 
trust,
 
execution,
 
and
 
commitment.
 
The
 
key
 
to
 
execution
 
is
 
trust.
 
There
 
is
 
a
 
contract
 
between
 
members
 
 –
 
an
 
agreement
 
with
 
consequences.
 
This
 
contract
 
is
 
not
 
written
 
or
 
formal,
 
but
 
rather
 
verbal
 
between
 
team
 
members.
 
If 
 
the
 
wingman
 
is
 
off,
 
he
 
must
 
say
 
he
 
is
 
off.
 
He
 
does
 
not
 
try
 
to
 
correct
 
on
 
his
 
own
 
or
 
hide
 
it.
 
If 
 
he
 
is
 
on
 
target,
 
there
 
is
 
no
 
need
 
to
 
say
 
anything.
 
He
 
trusts
 
that
 
his
 
wingman
 
has
 
it.
 
Finally,
 
the
 
last
 
level
 
includes
 
assessment,
 
discipline,
 
and
 
accountability.
 
During
 
debriefing,
 
rank
 
and
 
experience
 
are
 
put
 
aside.
 
Each
 
team
 
member
 
critiques
 
his
 
own
 
performance
 
and
 
commits
 
to
 
correcting
 
mistakes.
 
High
 
performers
 
celebrate
 
victories
 
as
 
well.
 
Contact
 
Center
 
Operations
 
101:
 
Seven
 
Critical
 
Issues
 
Rose
 
Pulchin,
 
ICMI
 
Rose
 
Pulchin
 
is
 
a
 
consultant 
 
at 
 
ICMI,
 
but 
 
started 
 
her 
 
career 
 
as
 
an
 
agent,
 
 progressing
 
to
 
supervisor 
 
and 
 
center 
 
management.
 
Her 
 
introductory 
 
session
 
is
 
intended 
 
to
 
give
 
a
 
base
 
understanding
 
to
 
those
 
who
 
may 
 
not 
 
have
 
had 
 
 formal 
 
training
 
is
 
the
 
business
 
but 
 
need 
 
to
 
get 
 
a
 
handle
 
on
 
the
 
economics
 
and 
 
undercurrents
 
of 
 
the
 
call 
 
center.
 
The
 
contact
 
center
 
is
 
a
 
hub
 
of 
 
communication,
 
encompassing
 
phone,
 
email,
 
fax,
 
mail,
 
text
 
chat,
 
and
 
more.
 
The
 
center
 
has
 
touch
 
points
 
with
 
many
 
other
 
areas:
 
corporate
 
strategy,
 
marketing,
 
finance,
 
legal,
 
R&D,
 
production/operations,
 
IS
 
and
 
telecom.
 
Customers
 
have
 
certain
 
expectations
 
from
 
the
 
contact
 
center.
 
First
 
and
 
foremost,
 
customers
 
expect
 
the
 
contact
 
center
 
to
 
be
 
accessible.
 
Along
 
the
 
same
 
lines,
 
customers
 
want
 
their
 
concerns
 
to
 
be
 
completed
 
promptly,
 
to
 
save
 
them
 
money,
 
and
 
to
 
do
 
it
 
right
 
the
 
first
 
time.
 
Without
 
asking,
 
a
 
customer
 
wants
 
his
 
expectations
 
set,
 
exceeded,
 
and
 
to
 
receive
 
follow
up.
 
Additionally,
 
contact
 
center
 
representatives
 
should
 
be
 
well
trained,
 
informed,
 
ethical,
 
courteous,
 
and
 
showing
 
concern
 
about
 
the
 
customers’
 
needs
 
and
 
wants.
 
Incoming
 
Contact
 
Center
 
Management
 
is
 
the
 
art
 
of 
 
having
 
the
 
correct
 
number
 
of 
 
properly
 
skilled
 
people
 
and
 
supporting
 
resources
 
in
 
place
 
at
 
the
 
right
 
times
 
to
 
handle
 
an
 
accurately
 
forecasted
 
workload
 
at
 
service
 
level
 
and
 
with
 
quality.
 
 
 
Annual Call Center Expo 2010
The
 
first
 
of 
 
three
 
driving
 
forces
 
of 
 
the
 
call
 
center
 
is
 
the
 
effect
 
of 
 
random
 
call
 
arrival.
 
Secondly
 
is
 
the
 
visible
 
or
 
invisible
 
queue.
 
With
 
visible
 
queues,
 
the
 
customer
 
knows
 
how
 
he
 
is
 
progressing.
 
With
 
invisible,
 
the
 
customer
 
is
 
unaware
 
the
 
length
 
of 
 
the
 
wait.
 
Often
 
long
 
wait
 
times
 
create
 
longer
 
handle
 
times
 
as
 
customers
 
complain
 
and
 
agents
 
apologize,
 
adding
 
seconds
 
to
 
each
 
call.
 
Thirdly
 
is
 
the
 
caller’s
 
tolerance
 
for
 
waiting.
 
Underlying
 
factors
 
for
 
tolerance
 
include
 
degree
 
of 
 
motivation,
 
availability
 
of 
 
substitutes,
 
competition’s
 
service
 
level,
 
level
 
of 
 
expectations,
 
time
 
available,
 
who
 
is
 
paying
 
for
 
the
 
call,
 
and
 
human
 
behavior.
 
There
 
are
 
two
 
major
 
categories
 
of 
 
inbound
 
transactions.
 
The
 
first
 
is
 
those
 
that
 
must
 
be
 
handled
 
when
 
they
 
arrive.
 
Performance
 
objective
 
is
 
stated
 
as
 
a
 
service
 
level
 
expressed
 
as
 
x%
 
answered
 
in
 
y
 
seconds.
 
(commonly
 
80%/20
 
sec).
 
The
 
second
 
is
 
those
 
that
 
can
 
be
 
handled
 
at
 
a
 
later
 
time.
 
Performance
 
objective
 
stated
 
as
 
a
 
response
 
time
 
expressed
 
as
 
100%
 
response
 
within
 
n
 
hrs/mins
 
The
 
data
 
required
 
for
 
forecasting:
 
Call
 
load
 
equals:
 
Volume
 
x
 
Average
 
Handling
 
Time
 
(talk
 
time
 
+
 
after
call
 
work)
 
 
Historical
 
data
 
o
 
Look
 
for
 
trends
 
o
 
Consider
 
if 
 
business
 
will
 
grow
 
or
 
decline
 
 
Judgment
 
o
 
Special
 
events
 
o
 
New
 
product
 
lines
 
o
 
New
 
self 
service
 
options
 
Base
 
staff 
 
=
 
agents
 
idle/available,
 
agents
 
in
 
after
call
 
work,
 
agents
 
on
 
a
 
call,
 
which
 
does
 
not
 
include
 
off 
phone
 
activity
also
 
called
 
shrinkage.
 
You
 
will
 
always
 
schedule
 
base
 
staff 
 
plus
 
shrinkage
 
for
 
off 
phone
 
(breaks,
 
absent,
 
training,
 
etc.)
 
Erlang
 
C
 
Equation
 
helps
 
solve
 
the
 
unknown
 
to
 
determine
 
number
 
of 
 
actual
 
agents
 
needed.
 
The
 
calculation
 
will
 
show
 
how
 
many
 
agents
 
are
 
needed
 
to
 
meet
 
a
 
service
 
level
 
with
 
a
 
certain
 
level
 
of 
 
occupancy
 
(on
 
phone,
 
after
 
call
 
work).
 
The
 
higher
 
the
 
service
 
level,
 
the
 
more
 
agents
 
are
 
required
 
to
 
be
 
available,
 
causing
 
lower
 
occupancy.
 
Smaller
 
centers
 
have
 
to
 
have
 
lower
 
occupancy
 
in
 
order
 
to
 
hit
 
same
 
service
 
level
 
 –
 
higher
 
percentage
 
of 
 
agents
 
have
 
to
 
be
 
idle
 
in
 
order
 
to
 
take
 
call
 
in
 
same
 
timeframe.
 
Relationship
 
of 
 
Service
 
Level
 
and
 
Quality
 
Service
 
level
 
slips
 
>
 
Customers
 
complain
 
about
 
wait
 
>
 
AHT
 
rises,
 
causing
 
longer
 
waits
 
>
 
Agent
 
feels
 
pressured
 
to
 
hurry
 
to
 
empty
 
queue
 
>
 
Customers
 
feel
 
rushed,
 
mistakes
 
are
 
made
 
>
 
Calls
 
increase
 
to
 
correct
 
errors,
 
call
 
volume
 
increases
 
>
 
Cycle
 
repeats
 
When
 
service
 
level
 
improves,
 
productivity
 
declines.
 
Productivity
 
is
 
measured
 
by
 
occupancy.
 
It
 
compares
 
time
 
spent
 
handling
 
calls
 
with
 
time
 
spent
 
waiting
 
for
 
calls.
 
It
 
doesn’t
 
consider
 
time
 
away
 
from
 
phones
 
for
 
breaks,
 

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