Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities

Ratings:

4.5

(4)
|Views: 2,754 |Likes:
Published by zhynn
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

More info:

Published by: zhynn on Apr 24, 2007
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as TXT, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/22/2013

pdf

text

original

 
TheProjectGutenbergEBookofATaleofTwoCities,byCharlesDickensThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwithalmostnorestrictionswhatsoever.Youmaycopyit,giveitawayorre-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincludedwiththiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.netTitle:ATaleofTwoCitiesAstoryoftheFrenchRevolutionAuthor:CharlesDickensReleaseDate:September25,2004[EBook#98]Language:EnglishCharactersetencoding:ASCII***STARTOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKATALEOFTWOCITIES***ThisetextwascreatedbyJudithBoss,Omaha,Nebraska.Theequipment:anIBM-compatible486/50,aHewlett-PackardScanJetIIcflatbedscanner,andacopyofCaleraRecognitionSystems'M/600SeriesProfessionalOCRsoftwareandRISCacceleratorboarddonatedbyCalera.TheProjectGutenbergEtextofATaleofTwoCitiesbyCharlesDickens[TherestofDickensisforthcoming]CONTENTSBooktheFirst--RecalledtoLifeChapterIThePeriodChapterIITheMailChapterIIITheNightShadowsChapterIVThePreparationChapterVTheWine-shopChapterVITheShoemakerBooktheSecond--theGoldenThreadChapterIFiveYearsLaterChapterIIASightChapterIIIADisappointment
 
ChapterIVCongratulatoryChapterVTheJackalChapterVIHundredsofPeopleChapterVIIMonseigneurinTownChapterVIIIMonseigneurintheCountryChapterIXTheGorgon'sHeadChapterXTwoPromisesChapterXIACompanionPictureChapterXIITheFellowofDelicacyChapterXIIITheFellowofnoDelicacyChapterXIVTheHonestTradesmanChapterXVKnittingChapterXVIStillKnittingChapterXVIIOneNightChapterXVIIINineDaysChapterXIXAnOpinionChapterXXAPleaChapterXXIEchoingFootstepsChapterXXIITheSeaStillRisesChapterXXIIIFireRisesChapterXXIVDrawntotheLoadstoneRockBooktheThird--theTrackofaStormChapterIInSecretChapterIITheGrindstoneChapterIIITheShadowChapterIVCalminStormChapterVTheWood-sawyerChapterVITriumphChapterVIIAKnockattheDoorChapterVIIIAHandatCardsChapterIXTheGameMadeChapterXTheSubstanceoftheShadowChapterXIDuskChapterXIIDarknessChapterXIIIFifty-twoChapterXIVTheKnittingDoneChapterXVTheFootstepsDieOutForEverBooktheFirst--RecalledtoLifeIThePeriodItwasthebestoftimes,itwastheworstoftimes,itwastheageofwisdom,itwastheageoffoolishness,itwastheepochofbelief,itwastheepochofincredulity,itwastheseasonofLight,itwastheseasonofDarkness,itwasthespringofhope,itwasthewinterofdespair,
 
wehadeverythingbeforeus,wehadnothingbeforeus,wewereallgoingdirecttoHeaven,wewereallgoingdirecttheotherway--inshort,theperiodwassofarlikethepresentperiod,thatsomeofitsnoisiestauthoritiesinsistedonitsbeingreceived,forgoodorforevil,inthesuperlativedegreeofcomparisononly.Therewereakingwithalargejawandaqueenwithaplainface,onthethroneofEngland;therewereakingwithalargejawandaqueenwithafairface,onthethroneofFrance.InbothcountriesitwasclearerthancrystaltothelordsoftheStatepreservesofloavesandfishes,thatthingsingeneralweresettledforever.ItwastheyearofOurLordonethousandsevenhundredandseventy-five.SpiritualrevelationswereconcededtoEnglandatthatfavouredperiod,asatthis.Mrs.Southcotthadrecentlyattainedherfive-and-twentiethblessedbirthday,ofwhomapropheticprivateintheLifeGuardshadheraldedthesublimeappearancebyannouncingthatarrangementsweremadefortheswallowingupofLondonandWestminster.EventheCock-laneghosthadbeenlaidonlyarounddozenofyears,afterrappingoutitsmessages,asthespiritsofthisveryyearlastpast(supernaturallydeficientinoriginality)rappedouttheirs.MeremessagesintheearthlyorderofeventshadlatelycometotheEnglishCrownandPeople,fromacongressofBritishsubjectsinAmerica:which,strangetorelate,haveprovedmoreimportanttothehumanracethananycommunicationsyetreceivedthroughanyofthechickensoftheCock-lanebrood.France,lessfavouredonthewholeastomattersspiritualthanhersisteroftheshieldandtrident,rolledwithexceedingsmoothnessdownhill,makingpapermoneyandspendingit.UndertheguidanceofherChristianpastors,sheentertainedherself,besides,withsuchhumaneachievementsassentencingayouthtohavehishandscutoff,histonguetornoutwithpincers,andhisbodyburnedalive,becausehehadnotkneeleddownintheraintodohonourtoadirtyprocessionofmonkswhichpassedwithinhisview,atadistanceofsomefiftyorsixtyyards.Itislikelyenoughthat,rootedinthewoodsofFranceandNorway,thereweregrowingtrees,whenthatsuffererwasputtodeath,alreadymarkedbytheWoodman,Fate,tocomedownandbesawnintoboards,tomakeacertainmovableframeworkwithasackandaknifeinit,terribleinhistory.ItislikelyenoughthatintheroughouthousesofsometillersoftheheavylandsadjacenttoParis,therewereshelteredfromtheweatherthatveryday,rudecarts,bespatteredwithrusticmire,snuffedaboutbypigs,androostedinbypoultry,whichtheFarmer,Death,hadalreadysetaparttobehistumbrilsoftheRevolution.ButthatWoodmanandthatFarmer,thoughtheyworkunceasingly,worksilently,andnooneheardthemastheywentaboutwithmuffledtread:therather,forasmuchastoentertainanysuspicionthattheywereawake,wastobeatheisticalandtraitorous.InEngland,therewasscarcelyanamountoforderandprotectiontojustifymuchnationalboasting.Daringburglariesbyarmedmen,andhighwayrobberies,tookplaceinthecapitalitselfeverynight;familieswerepubliclycautionednottogooutoftownwithoutremovingtheirfurnituretoupholsterers'warehousesforsecurity;thehighwaymaninthedarkwasaCitytradesmanin

Activity (2)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->