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Table Of Contents

LECTURE I. RECENT CRITICISMS OF "CONSCIOUSNESS"
III and IV. Also "Mysticism and Logic," Essays VII and VIII
1914. First German edition, 1886.)
"EXPERIENCE, I BELIEVE, HAS NO SUCH INNER DUPLICITY; AND THE
SEPARATION OF IT INTO CONSCIOUSNESS AND CONTENT COMES, NOT BY WAY
OF SUBTRACTION, BUT BY WAY OF ADDITION"(p. 9)
INTO FREUD'S REALM OF THE UNCONSCIOUS. It may be inferred from
LECTURE II. INSTINCT AND HABIT
Ammophila stings its prey EXACTLY and UNERRINGLY in EACH of the
CIRCUMSTANCES DO NOT APPARENTLY MAKE ANY DIFFERENCE TO THE LARVA,
LECTURE III. DESIRE AND FEELING
LECTURE IV. INFLUENCE OF PAST HISTORY ON PRESENT OCCURRENCES IN
LIVING ORGANISMS
(a) ACQUIRED HABITS.--In Lecture II we saw how animals can learn
(d) NON-SENSATIONAL ELEMENTS IN PERCEPTION.--When we perceive any
(e) MEMORY AS KNOWLEDGE.--The kind of memory of which I am now
(f) EXPERIENCE.--The word "experience" is often used very
TENDS TO CAUSE THE WHOLE REACTION B
LECTURE V. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL CAUSAL LAWS
LECTURE VI. INTROSPECTION
(1) PUBLICITY OR PRIVACY OF WHAT IS OBSERVED. Confining
(2) DOES EVERYTHING OBSERVABLE OBEY THE LAWS OF PHYSICS? We come
(3) CAN WE OBSERVE ANYTHING INTRINSICALLY DIFFERENT FROM
LECTURE VII. THE DEFINITION OF PERCEPTION
LECTURE VIII. SENSATIONS AND IMAGES
DEFINITION: recognition will be one of the marks by which my
XIII
LECTURE X. WORDS AND MEANING
LECTURE XI. GENERAL IDEAS AND THOUGHT
LECTURE XII. BELIEF
"ANY OBJECT WHICH REMAINS UNCONTRADICTED IS IPSO FACTO BELIEVED
AND POSITED AS ABSOLUTE REALITY."
A SORT OF FEELING MORE ALLIED TO THE EMOTIONS THAN. TO ANYTHING
LECTURE XIII. TRUTH AND FALSEHOOD
II. We may hold that the beliefs that constitute knowledge are
III. We believe that some beliefs are true, and some false. This
SOMETHING besides accuracy of response may be brought out by the
II. I have so far assumed as unquestionable the view that the
THE CONTENT OF THE JUDGMENT. What takes place may be a process of
III. Many difficult problems arise as regards the verifiability
IV. I come now to the purely formal definition of the truth or
LECTURE XIV. EMOTIONS AND WILL
DIRECTLY THE PERCEPTION OF THE EXCITING FACT, AND THAT OUR
FEELING OF THE SAME CHANGES AS THEY OCCUR ~IS~ THE EMOTION
LECTURE XV. CHARACTERISTICS OF MENTAL PHENOMENA
I. Physics and psychology are not distinguished by their
II. The two most essential characteristics of the causal laws
III. Habit, memory and thought are all developments of mnemic
IV. Consciousness is a complex and far from universal
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Bertrand Russell - The Analysis of Mind

Bertrand Russell - The Analysis of Mind

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10/30/2011

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