Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
January-February 2009 Echo Black Hills Audubon Society

January-February 2009 Echo Black Hills Audubon Society

Ratings: (0)|Views: 11 |Likes:

More info:

Published by: Black Hills Audubon Society on Sep 05, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/03/2012

pdf

text

 
Black HillsAudubon Society
 
Olympia, WashingtonVolume 40,Number 1 January/February 2009
Participate inEnvironmental LobbyDay, February 19
Black Hills Audubon is a co-sponsor o the eighteenthannual Environmental Priorities Lobby Day, Thurs-day, February 19, 2009, in Olympia. We have joinedother leading conservation groups and hundreds ocitizen lobbyists across Washington State to push orthe passage o the Environmental Priorities legislativepackage. These our priorities are legislation or:
•
Cap greenhouse gas emissions by setting real limitson global warming pollution
•
Promote super-ecient, low-energy-use buildings
•
To create and support transit-oriented communities
•
Invest in Clean Water through targeted ees to bepaid by polluters
Thursday, January 15
The Macaws ofTambopata
Joe and Kathy LaTourrette spent more than 3 weeksin Peru in October 2009, including a week in the Tam- bopata National Reserve (TNR). At 3.7 million acres,TNR is one of the largest tracts of protected tropicalrainforest in South America. They stayed at the Tam- bopata Research Center (TRC), a seven-hour trip upthe Tambopata River from the nearest town. They willshow snapshots and video clips of macaws and parrotsat the largest know mineral claylick in the world, aswell as 100+ other species of birds, monkeys, reptilesand amphibians in the upper Amazon basin.
Thursday, February 19
Washington’s
Not-So-Common Loon
Daniel Poleschook, Jr. and Virginia R. Gumm willeature common loon description, behavior, ecol-ogy and the necessary conservation required tomaintain or increase its low breeding populationo less than 15 territorial pairs in Washington. Theteam has been doing common loon research proj-ects and observations on Washington’s commonloons since 1996. They use high-magnicationdigital images to record and make determinationsor their eldwork. Their conservation work or
In this issue of The Echo
Environmental Lobby Day ..............................1Thurston Co Mineral Lands, Asphalt Plants ....2Dave McNett–In Memoriam ...........................3Dave McNett Education Award .......................3Spring Birding Class .......................................4BHAS Annual Dinner ......................................4Field Trips and Events ....................................5Summit or Planning Field Trips ......................5New WDFW Wildlie Website ........................6Observations rom the Window ......................7BHAS Calendar ...............................................8Birding in Earnest ...........................................9Conservation Updates ...................................10Bird Book Review...........................................11BHAS Roster .................................................12Membership Form ........................................13Nominations or Conservationand Education Awards ............................14
Continued on page 2Continued on page 7
 
 
Black Hills Audubon SocietyDuring Lobby Day
last year, members o Black HillsAudubon and others rom the Olympia area par-ticipated in strategic briengs led by environmentalorganizers, had questions answered, and practicedour powers o persuasion.Then we had good meetingswith Senator Karen Fraser andRepresentatives Sam Hunt andBrendan Williams.In the 2008 legislative ses-sion, ALL our o the environ-mental priorities o Prioritiesor a Healthy Washingtonwere successully passed andsigned by the Governor (withsome modications in SB6580and HB2844):
•
Climate action and green jobs (HB2815)
•
Providing local governments local solutions toglobal warming (SB6580)
•
Evergreen Communities Act, protecting and pro-moting urban trees (HB2844)
•
Bringing more locally grown produce into ourschools and ood banks (SB6483)On February 19, during the 2009 legislative session,Environmental Priorities Lobby Day again bringscitizen activists rom all over the state to Olympia tomeet with their elected representatives.
 Make a Difference. Sign Up Today!
Register today so we can schedule meetings withall your legislators. To register,go to pugetsound.org/policy/lobbyday09 or contact ReinAttemann, People For PugetSound,
rattemannpugetsound.org 
, (206) 382-7005 x213(People or Puget Sound ishandling registration or LobbyDay).Environmental Priorities LobbyDay will begin at 8:30 am atthe United Churches, 110 East11th Ave., in Olympia, opposite the Capitol Campus.There will be a reception in the evening.To learn more about the our priorities go to
ww environmentalprioritiesrg 
—Submitted by Sam Merrill, BHAS President 
On February 19, during the2009 legislative session,Environmental PrioritiesLobby Day again bringscitizen activists from allover the state to Olympiato meet with their electedrepresentative.
Lobby day, Feb 19
From page 1
Washington State’s Growth Management Actrequires counties to identiy lands where gravel,sand, and rock mining may occur. These are calledmineral lands o long-term commercial signicance.In 2003, Thurston County adopted a moratorium onthe designation o these lands and on the siting onew asphalt plants. The moratorium was adopteddue to concerns about insucient environmentaland public-saety protections in the permittingprocess. This was a six-month moratorium that hasbeen renewed eight times.During the moratorium, a Mineral Lands Task Forceand an Asphalt Advisory Task Force (both made upo industry, government, and citizen representa-tives) have met and have provided some guidelinesor making changes to the designation and permit-ting processes. Now, Thurston County will moveorward on these issues. In March o 2009, thePlanning Commission will begin review o the worko the Task Forces and will make recommendationsto the Board o County Commissioners (BOCC). Ten-
Thurston County Moves Forward onMineral Lands and Asphalt Plants
tatively, the BOCC will hold hearings on this in theFall o 2009.
In addition
, county sta will be making recommen-dations directly to the BOCC, perhaps as early asJanuary, 2009, or the adoption o interim regula-tions on permitting new gravel mines and asphaltplants. This more immediate process is being doneso that an additional renewal o the moratorium,unpopular with the gravel mine and asphalt indus-tries, will be avoided.BHAS will be monitoring this process and comment-ing on the recommendations. Immediate concernsare that the thoughtul mineral lands designationprocess, as envisioned by the Task Force, will becircumvented in a hasty regulations adoption pro-cess. This could result in reverting back to minerallands designation based on individual gravel mineproposals rather than designation based upon amore comprehensive approach. Appropriate sites
Continued on page 8
 
Black Hills Audubon Society
It is with sadness that we note the passing thisall o one o Black Hills Audubon’s most steadastand enduring volunteers, David McNett. Dave wasa charter member o BHAS and he served on theboard or three decades in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s.In this decade, he continued to serve as one o ourbest bird identication volunteers, helping beginnersand experts alike sort out their bird sighting—en-tirely through discussions o characteristics over thetelephone.Dave served in many leadership roles or BHAS;some o his best contributions were in the orm oletters to the editor and letters to ocials in whichhe took inormed and principled stands on conser-vation issues.Dave’s modesty and shyness belied a razor-sharpmind and ready sense o humor. He mastered notonly birds but multiple oreign languages. The tele-vision quiz-show
 Jeopardy 
was a nightly tradition orDave; he used to take quiet pleasure in outperorm-ing the contestants, especially in science catego-ries. Besides natural history and oreign languages,Dave’s major passion was young people and theirlearning. In his retirement years, he volunteered atseveral Olympia public schools, tutoring in a varietyo classes.Because o Dave’s deep commitments to environ-mental care and lielong learning, the Black HillsAudubon board has renamed the annual Educationaward the David McNett Environmental Educatoro the Year Award. It will be presented at the BHASAnnual Dinner, March 7
th
, 2009. In addition, i Echoreaders would like to remember Dave through adonation to Black Hills Audubon, know that we willinvest those unds in educational programming.Here are some excerpts rom a piece on Dave, writ-ten by his riend Bette Chambers or the newslettero The Humanist Society:“On October 23, we lost a national treasure. Wecalled him “Old Dave” and he was that: 86 on hispassing.Dave was a renaissance man, i that is a ttingdescription or someone so in tune with the pres-ent world. He was conversant in 17 languages andspoke ve fuently. While he was never paid muchor his work (which was mostly volunteer), hehelped kids with numerous subjects as well as lan-guages, including math, English and history. Just aew days ater his death, kids he had tutored at thelocal Lincoln School requested a special assembly inhis memory and the principal readily agreed.David lived on a shockingly paltry retirement in asubsidized apartment downtown. He had been un-able to drive a car or years, due to ailing health.And he remained a prime motivator o environmen-tal concerns, having played a role in Audubon’sprograms or well over thirty years. Proessors obiology at the nearby Evergreen State College otenconsulted Dave about the numerous species o thearea’s gulls, which even skilled ornithologists nddicult to identiy in the wild. I Dave didn’t knowthe answer, the question was hardly worth asking.At his memorial on November 8, over two hun-dred people came. No clergymen, just riends, andstudents and teachers rom the schools where hetutored and taught, and enthralled and inspired.The service was a true “celebration o lie.” Not asad word. Dave was no admirer o religious dogma-tism. He deplored the divisiveness that keeps theworld suused with hatred. He lived as a Humanist,whether he joined any organization or not.“Old Dave” is already deeply missed.
The Dave McNettEnvironmentalEducator Award
BHAS has named the Education Award in honor oDave McNett, who, we are very sad to say, passedaway this past Fall (See more about Dave on thispage). The rst Dave McNett Environmental Edu-cator Award or outstanding educational achieve-ments went to Tom Schooley and Tim Sweeney in2008 or their initiative and creativity in teamingup to produce the TCTV program series, BirdwiseMagazine. This program educated viewers or twoyears on local birds and birding places. The locallyproduced TV program on area birds and the peoplewho watch them was hosted by Tom Schooleyand produced and directed by Tim Sweeney, andeatured birding news, a calendar o events, birdingtips, backyard birding, educational eatures, andreports o research work.We are now proud to continue recognizing educa-tional eorts by area residents through this newly
In Memoriam – BHAS Volunteer Dave McNett
Continued on page 4

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->