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The Ukrainian Weekly 1954-20

The Ukrainian Weekly 1954-20

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www.ukrweekly.com
The Ukrainian Weekly was founded in 1933 to serve the Ukrainian American community and to function as a vehicle for communication of that community's concerns to the general public in the United States. Today the English-language newspaper publishes news about Ukraine and Ukrainians around the world; its readership, though mostly North American, is worldwide. The Ukrainian Weekly's editorial offices are in Parsippany, NJ; a full-time press bureau is located in Kyiv, capital of Ukraine. It is published by the Ukrainian National Association, a fraternal benefit life insurance society, based in Parsippany, NJ. Read more at www.ukrweekly.com
www.ukrweekly.com
The Ukrainian Weekly was founded in 1933 to serve the Ukrainian American community and to function as a vehicle for communication of that community's concerns to the general public in the United States. Today the English-language newspaper publishes news about Ukraine and Ukrainians around the world; its readership, though mostly North American, is worldwide. The Ukrainian Weekly's editorial offices are in Parsippany, NJ; a full-time press bureau is located in Kyiv, capital of Ukraine. It is published by the Ukrainian National Association, a fraternal benefit life insurance society, based in Parsippany, NJ. Read more at www.ukrweekly.com

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Published by: The Ukrainian Weekly on Sep 06, 2010
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09/06/2010

 
Dedicated
to the
idealsand Interests
of
youngAmericana,
of
Ukrainian. descentInformative, instructive.Supplement
of
Ukrainian. Daily SvobodaPublished
by the
Ukrainian NationalAssociation.
І
УКРАЇНСЬКИЙ
щоденник
ФШШШ
UKRAINIAN
0AILV
The Ukrainian Weekly Section
AddressUKRAINIAN WEEKLYSECTION»US3 Grand StreetJersey City
S, N. J.
Tel. HEnderson
і
1
*
023
'їU-0807Ukrainian National Ass'nTel. HEnderson -1-1016
РІК
ьха
4.
93
SECTION
П
SVOBODA UKRAINIAN WEEKLY SECTION. SATURDAY, MAY
15, 1954
SECTION
II
No.
93
VOL.
LXH
Prof.
R. Smal-Stocki Testifies BeforeCongressional Committee
on
Communist Aggrfession
N.
J. Governor Receives UkrainianEaster Gifts
Prof 88Roman Smal-Stocki of Marquette University,and President
of
the Shevchcn-ko Scientific Society, testifiedlast Saturday, May 8th, beforethe Select Committee
of the
House
of
Representatives
to
Investigate Communist Aggression A gainst Captive Nations.The hearings, held
in New
York's
US
Federal Courthousechambers, were presided over bycommittee chairman, Congressman Charles
E.
Kersten.Mr. Michael Piznak, generalcounsel
of the
Ukrainian Congress Committee
of
America,acted
in an
advisory capacityfor
Prof.
Smai-Stocky.Summarized,
Prof.
Smal-Stocki's statement, was
as
follows:Summary of
Prof.
Smal-Stocki'sStatement(a) For the listed acts
of
aggression against'
the
Ukrainian nation, responsible
is the
dictatorship
of the
RussianCommunist Party
in
Ukraine,which keeps
the
country
oc
cupied
by a Red
Russian political, police.. .This RussianCommunist dictatorship
is
established not only
in
the political sphere,
bub
also
in the
economic,' moral
and
spiritualspHeree. tt'Ti'the most complete
and
most terrible totalitarianism 'ever/ known
to
history, backed
hy the
wholemight
of the
Soviet Union..The task
of
the Soviet Unionand
its
Russian CommunistParty that they
set for
themselves
is
that,
of
enforcingMarxism-Leninism
on all
captive nations by means
of
terrorand revolutions.
Founded
on
the methods
of
materialisticdialectics, Russian Communismknows
no
other line
of
actionthan conflict
of
opposing for
ces,
most frequently physicalcombat, cruel
and
relentless.Stress
is
laid
on the
conception
of
conflict with
the
captive nation whose existence
is
regarded
as a
bourgeois provocation
;
this .conceptionof
c
о
n f
1
і c t is
basic
one
for
the
Russian Communistdoctrine
and a
necessarypostulate
of
"realism."
It is
a logical consequence
of the
I
materialistic dialectics
of
Rue-sian Communism that organic'development
and
peaceful| progress
are
unacceptable
to
Communists.Thue
all
captive nations
are
I
faced with
the
fact that
it is
.impossible
to
arrive
at any
permanent modus vivendi withaggressive Russian Communism
and
they have
the
onlypossible alternative:
to
surrender that means: nationa'revolution against Communis!terror.(b) The Russian Communistaggression against the Ukrainian nation,
as
against
all
othercaptive nations,
has a
clear
aim:
the formation
of
the "Soviet nation"
(now
RussianCommunists already
use the
term "Soviet people"
for the
first stage
of
this process.)This "Soviet nation", planned
as the
crown
of the
Russian Communist revolutionwill
be
characterized
by
uniformity
in
language,
by
Russifying
the
captive nations,
by
uniformity
of
culture,
by
theircultural Russification,
by
uniformity
of
thinking and partylife, by (immunizing them andby uniformity
of
religion,
by
enforcing upon them presentlyRussian orthodoxy.—in
'
'thefuture Russian atheism. Thiswhole process
is
systematically conducted under the slogan"progress"
and
"international
ism"
for
camouflaging Russianpolitical and cultural imperial
ism.
The aim of
this progres
is:
the
captive nation
by
constant aggressions
has to be"
dissolved"
and
"integrated".(c) The Russian Communistaggression against
the
Ukrainian nation,
and
all captive nations,
is
total:it
is
directed against
all as
pects
of
independent nationallife.
The
most importantmethods are:(1) organization
of
the Communist Party
as an
ideologicalarmy
in
civilian clothes
of
Russian Communism;(2) military aggression,
in
vasion, occupation; establishing
of the
Iron Curtain
and
full censorship;(To
be
concluded)
Eleventh Annual Detroit Spring
I A
LAST MINUTE SUGGESTIONConcert
to
On Thursday, April 22nd last,
a
group representing
the
Organization
for the
Defense
of
Four Freedoms
for
Ukraine,
fnc,
Trenton.
N. J.
Branch, visited the state capitol' in Trentonand presented Governor Robert Meyner,
of
New Jersey, withthe traditional Ukrainian "pysanky"
on a
hand-carved woodenplatter, and also books titled "Ukrainian Liberation Movementin Modern Times"
by
Oleh Martovych and "Ukrainian Underground Art."
an
album
of
the woodcuts made
in
Ukraine,
in
1947-1950
by
artist
of the
Ukrainian Underground
Nil
Khase-vych—"Bey-Zot"
and his
followers.These gifts were very graciously received
by
the Governor.When told that the "pysanky" were uncooked eggs,
he
held
on
to
the
platter tightly, rather than have scrambled eggs
on his
floor.Left
to
right
in the
photograph are: Miss Alicia Poniaty-'szyn,the Governor, Mary Ann Bojcun, and Zoryslava Gojaaiuk.The delegation
was
headed
by
Mrs. Olga Duly and Mrs.Evelyn Fedorowycz, president
of the
Trenton, Branch..
і The
above photograph appeared in^ the April
26,
of
the
"Trenton Evening" Thhcsl"Ten years ago
the
50th anniversary
of the
Ukrainian
Na
tional Association was observed with
a
thrilling program
of
Uk-r Yinian songs, dances,
and
other great features. Hundredswere turned away because they
had not
purchased theirtickets
In
time. The packed Carnegie Hall could
not
aceomod-ate them.Tomorrow's 60th UNA Anniversary Festival
at
CarnegieHall,
2
p.m.
may
prove
to be a
repetition
for
many
of
what
Youth
in
the Detroit Area
The Detroit Fiddlers Band, proceeds
arc
appropriated
Inc..
with Taras Hubicki
as
the Maintenance Fund.Conductor, will hold their 11th Inspired
by the
enthusiasmAnnual Spring Concert
on of
distinguished Detroiters,
the
Wednesday,
May 19, 1954 at
group
has
endeavored toward8:30 P.M.
at the
WWJ Audit- greater aims
and
ideals.
Щ^ШЩ^у^щ^
onum.
W.
Lafayette
and
Sec- expansion
of
membership both;
There
are
ш
,
вдгае t|rkets 0VaiIable
at
Carnegie Hairs'ond Avenue
in
Detroit. Mich, playing and supporting,
is
one
k^
ofac
«.—See
Adv
.
onp
. 3.
The Detroit Fiddlers Band,
of the
most important aims.
Inc.
is a
String Orchestra
for
Playing membership
is
open'
~
_
young musicians
of
Detroit.
It to any
young musician
of
De-' QoO(l NeWS
for
ІЛіГШПІйІІ АШСГІСШІis
a
non-profit corporation troit
and
vicinity, who
is stu-
furthering
the
training
of
dying
a
stringed instrument,young musicians.
Its
purpose subject
to
approval after
an
is
to
further interest
in
evm- audition
by the
Detroit
Fid-
phonic music among the young dlers Band.
The
Detroit District Coun-
1.
Write
n
letter stating that•tudent musicians
of
Detroit
The
Detroit Fiddlers Band.
c
" of the
U.Y.L.N.A. Will you meet
all
eligibility requirc-and vicinity,
and to
establish
Inc. was
founded
by its
pres- award
two $100
scholarships ments and give your reason
for
for worthy, needy
and
talent-
ent
director. Taras Hubicki.
to
the
newly initiated Ukrain-! desiring
to
attend
the
Ukrain-ed young musicians, scholar- well' known Ukrainian musl-
'an
Cultural Courses.
The ian
Cultural Courses. Writeships
and
instrument funds clan and conductor, who
is
one Course will
be
held from Au-, simply—your letter will
be
Which are awarded on the basis
of the
members
of the
Detroitof competition. Symphony Orchestra.The group meets weekly
for
This year's Spring Concertrehearsals. During these
in-
will consist
of an
interestingtereeting times, friendships are
and
intriguing program:
VI-
strengthened
and
appreciation valdi Concerto
for
two violins,of fine music
is
deepened, strings and organ; Mozart Con-Young artiste
are
encouraged certo
for
flute, harp
and or
Ukrainians to Take Part in Telethon
gust
2
through August
28 at
judged
on the
basis
of
yourthe U.N.A. estate resort, "So-1 expressed reasons,
not on lit-"
yuzivka", which
is
located
in
crary composition.Kerhonson,
New
York
at the 2.
Send
the
letter
to:
Schol-
'
foot
of
the Catskill Mountains,
j
arshlp Committee, DetroitThe Ukrainian Cultural
j
District Council, 6326 HansonCourses offer classes
in his-
Avenue, Detroit
10,
Michigan.'
(
tory, geography, literature,
All
letters will
be
acknowl-to high standards
of
personal cheatra; Ho^et Suite written
j
language
1
and grdUp activities
I
edged.
і >. .
Conduct
and
professional
per- for St.
Paul Girls' School Or-(which include folk singing and
3.
Your letter
of
application
;
fonnauce through able guld-, cheatra; Lehar Walts;
and
by .dancing! Iri
1
addition to
1
a
coh-j
m
"9t be" received 'by June
7,'
anqe- Public performances
are
popular request, five delight- centrated study. program inc. 1054.
'
presented each year
and the ful
LeRoy Anderson pieces. students* will
be,
enjoying
aj
Selection
of
scholarship win-
j | j ' —-'
'
summer vacation.. In.,
a
world-
n
ers will be made by the Schol-..m
' l_*
"O i. J i.
TTXT
4 Tfc 1
I famed resort area
of
breath-1
г8
. Committee
of the De-
Irophies rresentea to UNA Howlers-
taking
beaut*,
At the
soyu-
щ%и
owtrmt
councu.' wu*
___^____.
' '
land-scenic hiking trails.
-
l-nerawtyl im announced July sitt-
...u...
>.».:
. '-t' " *. . * .;•"'
v
sdyka.you'lt'ftrtd^rin\yfcourtiJ,U»6*.Troph.eswere presented
to One
of
the
salient point*
in
eW
mimfng-poof.
golf I
course 'ШЇЇЇЇЇІГУ^.^f'^.^te Hermans talk
was the
ГҐ you're a watfel^^^ofldifference between commercial
echoJarsh
, your only
ex- '"
CONCERT
Ukrainians
in
Chicago
are
550,000.
In
addition
to
thosegoing
to
participate
in the
stricken
at
birth, untold thou-Cerebral Palsy Telethon that sands acquire
the
condition
Irt
will
be
shown over A.B.C.'s later life
Appointed to
N.
Y. Insurance AdvisoryCommittee
Station W.B.K.B.,
in
Chicago.The Telethon will
be on
television
for 28
continuous hoursbeginning
at
10 P.M. on Friday,May
21st and end on the
following Sunday morning.The purpose
of
the Telethonis
to
raise funds
to
combatCerebral Palsy.Cerebral Palsy
is a
majorhealth ailment which
has
plagued mankind
all
throughToday we know that CerebralPalsy
is
caused
by an
injuryto
a
part
of the
brain whichgoverns muscular movement
in
various parts
of
the body.
The
injury results
in
impairmentof.
or
inability
to
control, certain muscles,
and
may involvethe limbs, speech, hearing.
01
any part
or
function
of thf
body.The Cerebral Palsv TelethonUNA.
to
individual high ovy.v.o
y*.
the Jersey City Division
of
the (and
I
UNA Bowling League
of the
Metropolitan N.Y.-N.J. Area
at
a banquet held Sunday night,May
9th. at the
Missiris Restaurant
in
Jersey City,
N. J.
Trophy and cash prizes wereannounced by the League presi-ient, Michael Pawelko and distributed
by
League treasurer,Stephen Kurlak.Principal speakers
at the af
fair were Gregory Herman,Supreme Secretary
of the
JNA,
and
Stephen Shumeyko,Editor
of The
UkrainianWeekly.
f
Mr. John Panchuk, Ukrainian American attorney-at-lawof Battle Creek, Michigan, andVice President
and
GeneralCounsel
of the
Federal Lifeand Casualty Company whosehome offices are
in
Detroit, wasrecently appointed
by
AlfredBohlinger, Superintendent
of
the State
of New
York's
In
surance Department newly-created 8-man Accident
and
Health Insurance AdvisoryCommittee.The purpose
is to
advise
the
insurance department concerning broad issues arising fromtime
to
time
in the A. & H.
business.
Second Annual Sitch BowlingTournament
The Ukrainian Athletic
As
sociation Chornomorska Sitch,Inc,'.of Newark,
N. J. is
sponsoring
its
second annual
Uk
rainian American BowlingTournament.All Ukrainian American menarc invited
to
compete.The tournament will
be a 70
per cent handicap. 200 scratch,3 games. Entry
fee is
S4.
The
tournament
is
rion profit,
and
all cash over cost
of
bowlingand minor expense will
go to
wards cash prizes.The "Sitch" will present twotrophies,
one
trophy
for 3
game high plus handicap
and
the other for single game highless handicap.Parkway Bowling Allev
at
900 Springfield Avenue, Irving-
ton,
N.
J.
will be
the"
site. Bowling will start
3
p.m., Sunday,May 16, 1954.Entry blanks can
bo
obtained
at the
"Sitch" hall, 506—18th Avenue. Newark,
N. J.
Late entry will
be
accepted
at
the alley until
the
startingtime.After the matches the "Sitch"will provide refreshments
for
the bowlers
and
their guestsand
at
which time
the
awardswill
be
made.recorded history.
As
insidious will mark
the
first time
in
Chi-aa
it is
cripling,
and as
per- cago, that announcers
of
vari-sistcnt
as It is
ancient. Cere-jous nationalities will speak
to
bral Palsy
is
perhaps the most
the
listeners
in the
languageprevalent crippler
In the of
their forefathers.United States today. 10,000 in-1 Remember
to
tunc
in to W.
fants arc born with
the
handi- B.K.B. Channel
7 on
Friday,cap each year.
The
number evening,
10 P.M.
of those affected
by
Cerebral
I
Remember
to
contribute
to
Palsy since birth
now
totals
4
fight against Cerebral Palsy.
Young UNA-ite Wins SpellingBee Crown
A
shy,
quiet Ukrainian Pennsylvania, won
a
week-longAmerican girl with
a
poetic visit
to
Washington, wherename is Western Pennsylvania's she'll compete
in the
nationalspelling champ today because spelling
bee
finals sponsoredshe
did not let
sizzling compe-
May 20 by
Scripps-Howardtition
get
under her epidermis, newspapers,reports Sherley
Uhl in a
fea-jture front page story
in the'
Fo
»- her
victory. Miss Bach-Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh,
j
ko receives
a set of the
Ency-Pa. daily
of
May
9th
last. iclopedia Britanica and
a
ZenithMelody Sachko
is the 6th
transoceanic radio,grade girl's name. The tall andslender 11-year-old daughterof Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sach
ko,
315
Wilbur street, Melodyis
a
member
of UNA Br. 53,
qf which
her
father
is
secretary.""Epidermis." meaning skin,is
one
word Melody Sachkowon't forget.It was one
of
the two wordsthat enabled
her to
triumphin the fourth annual PittsburghPress—KQV spelling
bee
lastSaturday,
May 8th, at
Schen-ley High School.Melody,
a
sixth-grader
at
Rochelle School, Knoxville,
Sophie Zepko
Sophie Zepko, age 30. daughter
of
Alex
and
AnastasiaZepko. sister
of Mrs.
Genevieve Zerebniak. vice-preaiden-tess
of
the UNA. Mrs. Ann Mc-Gowan,
and
Olga Zepko. diedlunday,
May 9
last
in the
\kron(Ohio) City Hospitalafter
a
long illness.The deceased
was
very
ac
tive
in
Ukrainian Americanvouth affairs and very popular.She
was a
member
of UNA
Branch
180, of the
UkrainianYouth's League,
the
Ukrainian Catholic League,
and the
Ohio State Ukrainian YouthLeague.Funeral services were heldlast Wednesday
at the Uk
rainian Holy Ghost CatholicChurch.fraternal life insurance
m
^ ^
tran3porta
1
companies
He
also compared
Uon
fare
and
_
f
cour8e
d
.|
Olga Pavlova." a leading
Uk-
the difficulties encountered
by .
ng
money
fQr
incidental8 You
'ramfan American soprano,the
old
immigrants
and
those
are
e
,
igib]e
.
f
meet
the
gavo
a
S
onccrt Surida
>'
n
.'W
:
encountered
by
their American
,
л1
,.
. .
.
.. . . .. ,. .,
following requirements.born youth
in
building
up the
f
1. of
Ukrainian descent,
2.
at least
16
years
old, 3.
highMr. Shumeyko commended
8chool
or
co
cge8tudenl
4
the Bowhng League as
a
source
averagc Hcholastic standingi
of inspiration
for
further
and 5.
have
a
sinccre
j,,^
jn
greater
UNA
sport activities Ukrainian history and culture.
І
І^Г7огГе7,"
a
Hungariannot only
in the
East
but
also Here
is
what
you do to
ap-1 love song,
and a
medley
of
in other areas
at
the
country,
ply:
Ukrainian folk songs.April
18th
last,
in th^e 'Sun
Room
of the Sea
Isle IlotclV30th street and Collins Avenue,Miami. Florida before
a
largeand enthusiastic audience.The singer's offerings included songs by Mozart, Schumann,EXHIBIT
AT NEW
YORK IMPORT SHOW
і
"the latest, finest
and
"jest'The Arka Ukrainian
Art
broideries, wood
-
carvin"s, from abroad"
at the
34thDepartment Store
of 48
East
f
"T^7~
Street (Park
Ave.)
Armory,7th street.
New
York
3,
N.Y..
ceram,cs
-
Еая
^г eggs
at
May
17
.
20>
19JH
from
nam
will exhibit Ukrainian
cm- the
New York Import Show—
to 9 p.m.
A REMINDER OF WHAT COMMUNISM STANDS FORArt Exhibit
The Barbizon Plaza Art Gal- "Prometheus"
as
well
as his
lery
at
Central Park South in [two paintings, "Portrait
of
MyNew York.
N. Y. is
currently
j
Daughter"
and
"Motion
Sym-
exhibiting paintings and sculp- phony"
are
prominently
dis-
turee
by the
Artists Fund played
at
this Exhibition.Members. Among
the
numberThe jury
was
composed
of
all American artists members
of the
National Academyof foreign artists from various localities
in
Europe
are
two well known Ukrainian art-ists. Zachary Makarenko
and »
New
Y
^K
who
chose
the
3.
Muchin.
1
exhibited paintings
and
sculp-Both Mr. Muchir.'s sculpture
tures
for
their originality and
|
"King Igor"
and
Makarenkos,high artistk quality.
O. R.
Pictured above
is the
Ukrainian float
in the
Loyalty Day Parade
in
Buffalo,
N. Y..
Sunday, May
2nd
last.
It
shows
two
Soviet sold'.ers brandishing their
JJU'W
at a
chained wom
an,
symbolizing enchained Ukraine.
*
The nationality groups were headed
by
Walter
V.
Chopyk, secretary
of
Buffalo's Public Works Commissioner,
and a
member
of
th
5
Ukrainian Na'ional Assoriat on.Among thoso reviewing
the
parade were Very Rev. AK'lander Ster.tnka.
of
St. Nicholas
1
Ukrainian Catholic Church,
and Rev.
Ihuman SviatoslavChurch. They both suffered from Soviet persecution.оГ Tiinity Ukrainian Orthodox
l
',
 
SVOBOPA UKRAINIAN WEEKLY SECTION, SATURDAY, MAY 15, 1954No. 93
£esya
Яікгаіп ka
By W. BESOUSHKO, Ph.D.(1)were suitable surroundings fora future poetess. Moreover,her mother was an excellenteducator and writer, as proved by educating her own children at home, and by editinga children's and a family magazine. Her mother did not wanther children to attend the Russian school and taught themherself in the Ukrainian language. Even the children'sgames were instructive; forinstance, one involving somescenes from the Odyssey. Le-sya mastered several languages, among them Russian,Polish, French, German, Latin,Greek, Bulgarian; later English, Italian and Spanish. Sheobtained an insight into thedevelopment of mankind, learned biology, botany, and othersubjects as well as the versetechnique. Only a highly talented girl could master sucha great mass of material in herdomestic surroundings. Family excursions to Kiev, thespiritual capital of Ukraine,brought a flow of new ideas. |Her world view was broadenedby contact with Michael Sta-ritsky, a poet, dramatist, andtranslator.At the age of eleven Lesyabecame sick. Tuberculosis firstattacked her bones and thenher lungs. She went from hospital to hospital, from one resort to another, seeking recovery. She was treated by famous Vienna and Berlin physicians, apparently recoveringbut only to relapse again intothe same illness. She was operated on. The poetess visitedmany places on the BlackSea, in the Crimea, in the Caucasus, in the Carpathian Mountains, in Germany, and Egypt,in search of health. She mar-ried an ethnographer and composer Klimenty Kvitka, in 1907,six years before her death.However, her sufferings in-the stage, etc We mention
1
creased; the illness consumedMichael Drahomaniv, because)her. She could live either inLesya Ukrainka was an exceptional poetess, who, as Dr.Percival Cundy expresessed it,was endowed "with unboundedimagination, keen psychological insight" and possessed"power and vigor of expressionnot surpassed by any womanwriter of Western literatures".(Spirit of Flame by LesyaUkrainka, p. 18). Forty-oneyears have passed since herdeath and a great amount ofcritical literature concerningher work has proved that shedeserves an honorable mention. We are able to do so,because there appeared anAmerican translation of herworks
1
in 1950, and recently anew Ukrainian-American edition in twelve volumes.'- Amost unusual phenomenon asto Lesya Ukrainka was heroptimism even in the worstcircumstances, bringing to ourmind the words of the Gospel:"Conquering death by dying."Led by his intuition, IvanFranko (in 1898) calted her'the only man in all our present-day Ukraine". We shallreturn to this expression todecide its suitability. First letus present a short sketch ofher life.Sketch of Her LifeLesya Ukrainka, her realname, Larissa Kosachivna,was born in Kolodyazhne, Vo-lhynia, Ukraine, in 1871. Herfather was a well-to-do landowner Peter Kosach of Servianstock who spoke only Russian.Her mother Helen Drahomanivwas a sister of the distinguished scholar Michael Drahomaniv, who was compelled toemigrate abroad. He proved tobe the best speaker for theUkrainian cause at that time,denouncing the czarist ukasewhich forbade the use of theUkrainian language in publiclife, as in printing books, onwrite in her 12th year. In thebeginning she was under theinfluence of Taras Shevchenkoand Panteleymon Kulish, auniversalist in Ukrainian culture. She never separated fromthe Bible. Her masters inpoetry were Alfred de Musset.Voctor Hugo, Heinrich Heine,Byron, Shelley, Maeterlinck,Ibsen, and Gerhard Haupt-maim. The Ukrainian criticNicholas Zerov observed thatLesya Ukrainka was endowedwith excellent hearing perceptibility, far better than hervisual one. It was a part ofher tragedy that she had tostop playing the piano becauseof her illness. In her poetrywe have various forms of verse,many of which she introducedinto Ukrainian poetry, as stated by the Ukrainian critic B.Yakubsky. (Lesya Ukrainka,Works, II, pp. 8-11). Herverse is sonorous and verycarefully constructed. It set anexample to Ukrainian poets.Only seldom did she write ofher sad fate, bearing her
suf
fering silently. Her lyricswere mostly of a social character. Her call was to strugglein order to achieve a bettersocial order and a better national position. She knew thatthe road to betterment has always been proved by sacrifice.Love of her native countrymarks all of her works. Shewrote: "Let others seek indreams for future happiness;I do not wish to sleep, but liveand burn" (Spirit of Flame, p.43). No other Ukrainian poetbelieved so much in the powerof poetry as Lesya Ukrainkadid. In former ages the poetencouraged the fighters intheir battles with the enemy.Lesya Ukrainka wanted to remain in the same role, summoning the people to fight evil.She could not take a great
£Book ZRe'vie'W
S. V. BEZSONOV, Architectureof Western Ukraine. Editionof the Academy of Architecture of the USSR. Moscow,1946, pp. 96, 16°.After the occupation of thevarious lands taken by theSoviets in 1945, Moscow showed a noticeably' great interestin the "little known lands",their wealth and values. Thisinterest extended also to thespheres of art and architecture. The book of Bezsonov isdivided into three parts, whichbegin with quite long historical introductions, which haveno direct connections with awork
'
on art but which arepurely of propagandists importance to stress definitelythe unity of these newly acquired territories with Moscow.The author carefully avoidsSoviet Works Out of DateThe worKs of the contemporary' Russian eoientific publi-tions have a strange appearance, for they are out of datein comparison with the scientific work of the West and arecomplications of the older Russian authors of tsarist times.We must mention that in abibliography of 50 works inRussian, he lists only 14 inUkrainian, and does not usethese Ukrainian works in histext. Yet during the last30 years, the Ukrainian workson the study of the historicalarchitectural monuments ofWestern Ukraine have produced much and completelynew material, carefully documented, critically tested, withdetailed plans of buildings andother graphic materials. Asa result of this frivolous at-speaking of the Ukrainian titude to foreign literature,people and its creative work.He calls the present population of Volyn and Galicia"Slavs" and their culture heconnects with Moscow patterns.Also in his opinion, this "Slavic people of Galicia" had feltvery little Western Europeaninfluences. He uses 4he oldRussian method of ignoringor twisting the special featuresof the Ukrainian artistic creations, the Ukrainian style,and the significance of Ukrainian artists. When he iscompelled to mention theseUkrainian features, he labelsthem as "Slavic art", the "national Slavic element" or "local peculiarities," "local taste".The Book Surprises OneAs a study of art, the booksurprises by its primitive character and its use of the antiquated descriptive method.There are no very long artstudies, a comparative styl-of his deep influence on ourpoetess. Lesya Ukrainka wrotethat her uncle clarified herviews on religion, sociology,and politics. She dedicated toher uncle "Robert Bruce", apoem from Scotch history, inwhich she expounded a view ofDrahomaniv that the peasantry was the best foundation ofa nation, as exemplified in Ukraine. Later Lesya Ukrainkamodified her view.The estate of her parentswas situated in a provincialhamlet surrounded by beautiful scenery, by the woods, andinhabited by peasants with athousand years traditions behind them, and with a heritageof poetry, stories and superstitions. Every place wasanimated by some being, natural or supernatural. These
1
Spirit of Flame a Collection ofthe Works of Lesya Ukrainka.Translated by Percival Cundy.Foreword by Clarence Manning,Bookman Associates (New York,
50).
-
Lesya Ukrainka, Works (in U-krainian), in 12 volumes, G. Tysz-czenko A. Bilous Publishing Co.(New York, 1953-1954).the Caucasus, or in Egupt being in need of a mild climate.Lesya was very interested inthe social and political life ofher own country. She tried tobe active in social work. Shecould be called the barometerof the spiritual life of Ukraine.She succumbed to her illnessafter her heroic struggle, inher 42nd year, in 1913, andwas buried in Kiev.A Sick Woman's Song ofLiberationThis sick woman sang a songof liberation all her life, continuing the work started byShevchenko. Her song ofliberation was the most powerfulin all Ukraine of her time. Inorder to get new fighters forliberty, she reproached her nation in which the very wordfreedom was becoming obsolete. She got them, as provedby many valiant deeds duringthe national Ukrainian revolution against the czarist andBolshevist regimes at the endof the first world war, .andafterwards. Lesya began to
GRASS ROOTS OPINION
GREAT FALLS, MONT.,LEADER: "We have evidencethere is a brand new philosophy being promoted in Washington. It comes from Secretary, of the Treasury Humphrey. He says: 'The peoplecan spend their own money fortheir own account and theirown way for what they wantmuch better than the government can spend it for them.'For more than 20 years thepeople have been given to understand that only WasMng-ton had all the answers."
Qoet's Comer
AH
That Lives
As all that lives, the desert sands shift,Their whisper low like flowing water's
murmur,
Enchants the soul. Dreamer, behold!Your hear it best from underneath your
roof.
So do not pack your trunk, nor touch the mop.
Learn how to close your eyes and wait,
Perhaps your soul is of those rich and rareThat barken to the universe from your own room.
A. PLUZHNYK
(A. Pluzhnyk, Ukrainian poet, died inexile in Solovki Islands 1937)
Translated
by
MIRA HORDYNSKY
enough part in social work, in-|i*tic analysis, the evolution ofstead her words became BOfiery ' that they bordered, onreal deeds. For her personallife,the verse cited below isvery characteristic, becausealthough hopeless, she wantedto hope on against all odds:("Hence, dark thought:*! Away,you autumn mists!; Goldenspring is here, she's here today
!
(Should my days of youthbe spent in woe, (Drearily andsadly pass away?) (Nay,through all my tears, I still willsmile, (Sing my -songs thoughtroubles round me looms;(Hopeless, still hope on againstall odds,) I will live! Away,you thoughts of gloom."(Spirit of Flame, p. 50)(To be continued)Bezsonow has made many factual mistakes in dates—yearsand centuries, the names andentire types of buildings, stylistic details,'authors of works,etc. For example, he dates thefoundation of Lviw in the XIIcentury (p. 8), when it was in1252, Of the city of Halychhe says that "some" churcheshave been found there, when inreality 271 have been excavat-, Ukrainian architectural monu-ed. He makes no mention of"
1
*
of
Western Ukraine be-the oldest building of Lviw-'long to the Ukrainian people,the castle church of St. My-
,h
e rarely puts any weight onkola of the beginning of іЬе'^
еіг artistic value
-
beaut
-
v and
XIV century, which was treat-
і
^
e
peculiarities of the Ukrainian architectural monu-to the so-called "social command" as it is now practiced inthe Soviets, Bezsonov was ordered at all cost to show thekinship of Ukrainian architecture to Russian. And since inMoscow the architectural monuments are much more recentand rarely go back to the XVcentury the author uses theartistic monuments of Novgorod, Suzdal, and Vladimir onthe Klyazma. But in these comparisons he makes only general, arbitrary remarks, without giving any proofs, concretestatements or a comparativeanalysis of style. He, however,cannot completely pass overthe fact of the influence of Ukrainian architecture on thenorth Russian, which has beenasserted not only by foreignauthors but by some of themore important Russian students.Yet this influence of theUkrainian artistic culture, hetreats as "kinship" with Moscow, and ignores the dates ofthe buildings and their topography.West Ukraine Architecture UkrainianWithout mentioning thenames of Ukrainian or Polishartists and the fact that thecd in a new monograph in Ukrainian in 1936. The wellments. The tone of the book isdry, formalistic, without loveknown engraving of Lviw inthe publication Civitas orbis
and stl
»
m
«
re wl
^
out еп
^
8
-terrarum he "dates in 15S5.|
iasn
\
for
,
hls
•$*«*. Whatwhen it should be 1617. The
can be so formal
«"I "differ-
A«t an
і
! і! і ї 14 тл тпл тлпп.
Curch of St. Vasyl in villageof Zymhe near Volodymyr informs,, an analysis of architectural,
,
forms, •. constructtions or techniques of building.Bezsonov uses the literatureof the end of the ХГХ centuryand the beginning of the. XX,exclusively in Russian, a literature that is completely antiquated, often not documented and superficial. He docs'not know the literature in Polish, German and other languages, which are an important source for the architectural monuments of the Western Ukrainian lands. It has become the practice of the Soviet scholars m the publications of the varios Moscow"Academies" to ignore totallyforeign literature.'ent an attitude to the monuments of the past and the "Old. r, Testament" method as theVolvn, he dates in the XV- . . ,,,, " , ... ,. Marxo-Lemmst-Stahmst meth-XVI centuries, while according.. , . . >; *
.,„ odology of art study? But letto the latest etudies of Raczyn- ,
b
,-
7
. ,;. ,....,,,... ... .. . us look at the publications ofski, Wahcki, and the author of
. Jr , , ,.this same Academy of Architecture of the USSR, which'are devoted to Muscovitearchitecture, as for example,the publication of the Monuments of Russian Architecture.this review, it was in thej^Cpi-ХШ centuries. On antiquated material he consideresthe architect De Witte to havebeen the builder of the Cathedral of St. George in Lviw.Yet according to the more recent studies by ' Mankowski,•Hornung, and the monographof this reviewer on the Cathedral of St George (Lviw, 1934,pp.'138), where there was usedthe newly discovered Book ofthe Building of St. Georgefrom the middle of the XVIIIcentury it is definite that thebuilder of this Cathedral wasthe architect Meretyn of Me-rettini.The "Social Command"It is obvious that according
HAS THE UNITED STATESRECOGNIZED UKRAINE?
extension of Remarks of HON. LAWRENCE II. SMITH ofWisconsin, in the House of Representatives, Thursday,April 8, 1954
(3)
This principle obviously per- tion as the United Nationsmits no other interpretation
j
amounts to general recogni-save that the position of ea(h
tlons and even
nonmember. . . . ... ., , nations, the status of suchmember is legally exactly thesame in relation to all othermembers. It is, thereforeclear that from the principleof the United Nations, Ukraine and Byelorussia are sovereign nations, and Jhat theU.S.S.R. does not representthese two Republics in the U.N., or on the internationalto withhold recognition. Thetwo latter opinions seem tobe applied in practice (theoryof automatic recognition asdeclared by the Foreign Secretary of Yugoslavia), andtheir validity is also borne outby legal consequences flowingfrom membership' In such organizations as the United Nations.Significance of Admission toUnited NationsAdmission to the United Nations means much more thanmere recognition of statehood.To rights and duties flowingfrom international law must beadded specific rights and du-believe that admission to membership in such an organiza-newly admitted members being determined objectively(Wright).The opinions cited under(A),(B), and (C) are basedon the principle that a sovereign state constitutes the solecompetence unto itself on whomto recognize and from whomforum otherwise. The BritishCommonwealth and League ofNations used the term BritishEmpire only as applied toGreat Britain, Northern Ireland, and those parts of theempire which were not members of the League (Wright).Kelsen holds a similar view: Amember of the United Nationshas a series of duties andrights in relation to everyother member, but no relationcould exist in the absence ofrecognition of legal capacity.U.S.R, Has Already RecognizedUkraineThe different opinions ofvarious authors cited abovethrow full light on the problem of a relation between admission to the United Nationsand recognition. In the instant reference, to Ukraine andByelorussia it is quite immaterial, however, which of theseviews will be taken as thebasis for arguing that theyhave been duly recognized bythe United States of AmericaRegardless of whether we follow the view of Lauterpachtthat Ukraine and Byelorussiawere recognized by 47 governments voting unanimously tortheir admission to the UnitedNations in San Francisco onApril 27, 1954, or whether, inaccord with Kelsen, we increasethe number of those givingrecognition to 58, addingthose members of the UnitedNations who were absent fromthe San Francisco meeting ofthat date due to a delay inthe arrival of their delegates,in each event ihe United Statescast an affirmative vote for theadmission of Ukraine and Byelorussia. This opinion is shared and expressed by such
<m
authoritative sources as "TheAmerican Journal of International Law" (1945). The ruleof international law permits nodoubt that the United Stateshas recognized Ukraine andByelorussia de jure, and any-legal obstacles to the exchangeof envoys with these two republics are nonexistent, despitethe political fact of their enslavement.JOIN THE UKRAINIANNATIONAL ASS'N TODAY!Why are not these calledMonuments of the EasternRSSR, when in this book underreview there is kept the purelygeographical term, The Architecture of Western Ukraine. Inthe works on the monumentsof Russian architecture there areno Marxist excursuses, which,are always demanded by Moscow in Kievan publications, notrace of attack on the churchas "the opium of the people,"or remarks on "bourgeois nationalists." All the historicalmonuments of Muscovite architecture, including the churches,are praised as "works of genius, incomparable, great worksOf the Russian people, althoughas a rule, they were built by-foreigners, Italians, Germans,French, etc. Besides Bezsonovconstantly treats of politicalhistory, and represents thehistory of Moscow in a rosylight. The bloody dealings withthe entire free cities, landsand peoples which Moscowviolently and brutally overthrew and imposed slavery,famine, annihilation, inthis book on "art" are treatedas the joyful "process of. theunion around the principalityof Moscow" and the "creationof the Russian national state."Here he says that the "national awakenig called to life theidea of Moscow as the ThirdRome, in accordance withwhich the great Russian statewas the heir of the ruined Orthodox Byzantium". This imperialistic propaganda of the'Marxian art studies" does notdiffer from the most reactionary Tsarist "Slavophiles", butthe newer Soviet authors arcundoubtedly more chauvinistic.A Very Curious RemarkAt the end of the book weread the very curious remarkof Bezsonov (or the socialtask), that the study andpreservation of the monumentsof art and ' architecture inWestern Ukraine have beentaken over by Soviet scholars,architects and artists, as "oneof the forms of brotherly(Concluded on page 3)
trivial?
Last Last week I wrote abqjftjuvenile delinquency. Thisweek, to extend my remarksfurther on the subject, I wantto call attention to a surveycompleted last week amongNorth Jersey high school andcollege students in the matterof lying and cheating.The survey revealed thatthe students interrogated donot consider lying or cheatingas serious offenses. Rather theyare inclined to consider themas trivial.The survey was conductedby Warren L. Duncan, industrial coordinator at FarleighDickinson College in Rutherford, N. J. 3,000 students filledout questionnaire in the collegeand in Bergen and Passaiccounty high schools:The results revealed that 19per cent of the students namedlying, as an active delinquency,and 29 per cent felt that wayabout cheating. However, 88per cent said stealing and robbery were delinquencies.Duncan said many students,in written remarks they filledout at the end of the questionnaire, indicated a belief thatlying and cheating are normalfactors in modern society andare necessary in the achievement of business success.The survey revealed that college students feel parents andthe community share the mostresponsibility for providing remedies for delinquency. Highschool youngsters believe delinquency is their responsibility firstand their parents second. Bothgroups indicated belief thatthe roles of religious organizations and the government incurbing delinquency rate lower.As far as lying and cheatingis concerned, I still cling tothe belief that both are nottrivial but serious. Anyonewho practices either, is boundto find himself on the road toworse offenses. That has beenproven time and time again.Honesty has always beenthe best policy.Josephine Gibajlo Gibbons
е
UNA
JubUe€
By-MYROSLAVA
This Sunday afternoon, onMay 16, at 2 p.m. the Ukrainian National Association willpresent a Ukrainian Music andDance Jubilee at CarnegieHall in New York City in commemoration of its 60th Anniversary.It was first organized inShamokin, Pa., February 22,1894 and since then, has become the first and foremostUkrainian Fraternal Order inAmerica; rendering the following deeds to its Ukrainianmembers.Among them are:For years a benefactor tothousands of widows, orphansand cripples.It offers up-to-date insurance plans.Financial assistance to students. Dividends after ashort period. Financial assistance to athletic teams.The Ukrainian Weeklygratis.The Ukrainian National Association has helped the immigrant to adjust himself tohis new environment in thenew world, and instilled in himand his shildren the love forthe true ideals of Americandemocracy.The Ukrainian National Association is owned and controlled by the Ukrainian people,by the democratic systemof government.The Ukrainian National Association greatly influencedand contributed to the development of the social, business,cultural and political life ofUkrainians in America. -'Tis a worthy record indeed!One, that any fraternal organization, can truly, be proud of!
THE AMERICAN WAYFaith and Know-How
(EDITOR'S NOTE: DeWitt Emery is president of the NationalSmall Business Men's Association.)the hood. We are familiar only with a few exposed levers,dials and controls with whichwe are supposed to operatethe machine. It takes a lot offaith as well as a workingknowledge of which controldoes what.Mention of the essential element of faith, while it weakens the comparison of oureconomy to one vast mechanism, at the same time emphasizes the most vital asyect ofour economic machine—whichis that all of its mechanicalparts are utterly useless without the i>eople who run it.That is why no mere listingof all our tools, devices, factories, patents, formulas andphysical resources—impressiveas they are—can ever really explain the American economicsystem. While we usually*hink of it in terms of its moreobvious physical assets ourthousands of factories, somecontaining more than a squaremile of area under their sprawling roofs; plus the acres ofcomplex machine tools at workin them; plus the myriad of appurtenances like railroads andpower lines that link our industrial plants with the mines,the mills, the forests, the landand other raw material sourceson the one hand and with allthe warehouses, stores andmarketing equipment on theother—even al) these thingstogether do not encompass allthat is our economic machine.Its key parts are people—160.000,000 of them. And thesecret of this productive machine of our is the
wa£ wemake it work for us, as opposed to our working for it-No small aspects of the miraclethat results is the peculiarkind of faith or confidence thatTo think about our wholefree enterprise economy as onevast economic machine is really not so very farfetched because that is the way it works.No single part of it functionsall by
itself.
Every industryevery factory, every machinetool, even every one-man-business, every newspaper daily orweekly is connected in manyways with all the rest of theeconomy.This maze of inter-connections, the meshing of all thegears, large and small, economic and mechanical, has beengrowing steadily more closeand complicated ever since ourfirst loose and scattered colonial economy began to takeshape. One needs only to scanour history to recognize thatgadgeteering, mechanization,and the complicating businesspatterns they lead to are notjust recently acquired habitsof ours.How succeeding generation?of Americans have built ourvast and complex present-day-national economic machine isexceptionally weyy known. Onthe average, we can prabablyname more famous Americannventors and empire buildersthan thatesmen.But note this about theprocess—within our own life-ime the growth of our na-ional economic machine hasbecome so speeded-up, changedcomplicated and periodicallyipset by depressions, booms,
л-ars, revolutionary inventionsand political experiments thatthe whole economic machineand its workings have becomeone vast confusion so far asthe individual's ability to seeit all is concerned/Our economy, like our automobiles, now has most of itsworking parts obscured under we place in it
 
NQ.
93-.SVOBODA —UKRAINUN WEEKLY SECTION, SATURDAY, MAY 15, 1954
WOULD TUE U.NA. BENEFITFROM A SPORTS PROGRAM?
By MICKEY ІІЛМЛІ.ЛКThe above question opens a:$$100 each
and
2nd placefield of discussion for the good' would get $90 and on downand welfare
of
the UNA. A'the list. Remember that eachsports program can help bring bowler .would also contributein new members
as
well as $2 to each event for he or shekeep the present members active, would have to pay $3.50 ... orPassive membership just for
j
about that amount... to enterinsurance is not a healthy sign
j
the tournament. $1.50 wouldfor any fraternal organization.
 
cover the bowling, scorers andThat type of insurance can be: tournament expenses, $2 wouldpurchased locally in the large!be added to the cash prize lis,t.insurance companies and have!With 300 bowlers
in a
tour-the collector call weekly for ney, that would mean $1,500the premiums. Membership in more added
to
the cash list.a fraternal organization is
j
You need not use ail the $200based
on
nationality, race,
j
for many fraternals just matchfriendships, religion, culture,
J
the money contributed by the
etc.
Insurance is vital and many bowlers. During the first
few
times is the link between those!years the fund could grow andthat want
to
leave the ranks
j
a reserve built up so that whenbut find enough investment
J
the bowlers start
to
eontri-after
a
few years that
it
is bute more than the budgetgood business to continue their calls for, we could* draw
on
membership. Fraternals that the reserve.
I
may sound likestress social membership have'an optimist
but the
Greeka large turnover.
j
Catholic Union with 35,000If the sports program is self
і
adult members had 97 teamssupporting and the fund is at their 18th tourney at Bing-earmarked for sports only, the [ham on on the May 2nd week-means of measuring the value
(
end. The UNA can match thatcan easily be determined in a;within
3
years.4 year period. My last article] The press releases
on
tlfesuggested one cent per mem-(sports pages of teams in localber per month or 12 cents per'leagues and national tourna-year..This means about $5,000 ments would be priceless. Thatper year based on 10.000 adult'kind
of
publicity would makemembers. This $5,000 can be youngsters want
to
bowl
in
sliced up as follows:Ukrainian leagues with fellow$520 per year salary
of a
Ukrainians rather than gettingSports Director. into house leagues. Bowling$480
for
mailing, phones,' leagues would have socials,traveling, etc.500 for golf tournaments.$500
for
basketball, soft-ball, etc.''$500 for soccer.$2,500 for bowling.Note that $2,500
is
allowedfor bowling. That can
in-
volve all age groups and bothparties, trips and all that tendsto make friends and bind people into units.The Croatian FraternalUnion have 132 teams in theirTourney
in
Detroit this year.They have added 22.000 mem-oers in the' past
8
years and
PUBLICIZE YOUR BRANCH
The Ukrainian National Association
has
almost
500
branches in the United Statesmd Canada. Just about everyone
of
these branches
has
jome members who were bornIn North America. This periodical is published for thesemembers and
al)
interestednon-members.Despite the fact that theyouth
of
the UNA. has
its
own newspaper, very few
of
the 500 branches are publicized
in
it. The old folk seeto
it
that the branches areregularly publicized
in the
Svoboda, but
it is
clearly
up
to the young people to promotethe branches via the Weekly.At one time the young members of the U.N.A. were takingadvantage of the publicity' opportunities offered
by the
Weekly.Jn fact, so much matter was being received thatthe Weekly often overflowedinto the Svoboda. At that time,however. The Ukrainian Weekly was less than 2/3 in word-age space of what
it
containsnow.The Weekly is still availablefor publicity purposes.
Its
іюіісу
in
this respect
has
never changed.
It is
still thebest medium the young peoplenave to exchange news, views,and ideas.' And
it
is not truethat the Weekly caters only tothe grownups; material fromchildren always was and stillis welcome.Every U.N.A. branch havea publicity man or
a
commit
tee.
There are elections to report and social functions to advertise and publicise. Withoutdoubt many U.N.A. membersare serving in the U. S. Army,Navy. Marines, Air Force; reports on' the young people
in
uniform make interesting read-is
a
part of
a
fraternal benefitsociety consisting
of
75,000members.It is not necessary to havespecial qualifications
in
orderto serve as
a
publicity man orbe
a
member
of a
publicitycommittee. Anyone who canwrite
a
letter can prepare
a
report (copy) for
a
newspaper. The important thing is tostate all the facts and be surethey are right. The editor ofthe paper will make all necessary corrections and deletions;talk
or at
least .understandhe may even rewrite the whole [^Ukrainian. Those who are ac-give sports as the No.
1
reathe increase. Their!ding and publicity men shouldtrophies while $200 for tour-[present membership is 105,000. not hesitate
to
submit them,nament expenses. $2,000 wouldjThe writer will gladly assist (The Weekly also welcomessexes. $300 would be used for,son forbe donated into
a
cash prize'any U.N.A. Committee"
or
fund which would be divided
[
Sports Director in formulating1/3 to the Bcratc,b-bowlers and!'a program and guiding
the
2/3
to
the handicap bowlers.
I
policy. The writer plans
to
Everyone would. receive some- visit in Washington during
1
thething.- This would be another Convention and will meet withway of donating financial help any Committee desiring moreto teams which
is
being done, information
on the
subject,in outright Siims upon re-і Do not neglect the question,quest. (Many
of
your possible mem-The writer
is a
member
of
hers . are being "stolen"
by
various fraternals and that* is other Slavic Fraternals withthe plan Used
oy all
Slavic sports' programs. Competitiongroups. Top teams would win
is
keen
in
all Slavic centers.
WITHOUT PREJUDICE
By TKD LUCIWitems about college graduates,report, no matter how well
it
may have been written originally.
If
the report has anynews value or reader interestit will be used. An examination
of
any locrfl newspaper<vill reveal many items aboutalL kinds of clubs and organizations, the work
of
conscientious publicity men and committees.Publicity has value.
It
letspeople know that the Ukrainians
in
town are active amithat they represent
a
part ofa large national organization.It will attract people to socialand athletic functions.
It
willbuild prestige.
It
will bringnew members into the branch.Publicity
for a
branch alsohelps the U.N.A.Publicity opportunities in theWeekly
and the
Americanpress are almost without limit.The space is available. Everybranch
of
the Ukrainian National Association should getits share
of
publicity. American clubs and organizations—important
and
unimportant,large and small—have publicity men or committees sending out copy regularly, andthere is no reason
at
all whythe U.N.A. branches shouldnot be doing the same thing.Very few American clubsand organizations have theirown printed newspapers. Theyouth of the U.N.A. have The
SHAL WE LEARN UKRAINIAN?
By DR. M. II. HAYDAKSuch
a
question undoubted-
j
to know one more languagely comes to the minds of many besides English. This shouldAmerican-born young people be easy
to
accomplish hereof Ukrainian extraction. Manyfeel that
in
an ordinary lifeof a community, seldom, if ever,the knowledge
of a
foreigntongue
is
necessary. Thosewho are coming
to
the Ukrainian Church or the Ukrainian gatherings sometime areconfronted with
the
situation that they have
to
tive in the group usually arequite proficient in both writtenand spoken language.Such
a
dilemma: "WhetherI should know the language ofmy parents
or
should
I
justforget about the matter"—ispeculiar not only to the American-born youth of the Ukrainian extraction, but is
a
universal problem and, in most cases,is decided upon individually,depending on the character ofthe upbringing, cultural andtraditional connections withinany particular group, memoriesof the early life, some outstanding events giving
the
strongest impression duringthe childhood, etc. The fact is.however, that more and moreyoung people
of
the first
and
second generation
of
immigrants
to do
not learn
the
language
of
their parents.
Is
language
of
your parents, be-this good
for
them—is this cause you may understand thewhere there are so many parents still speaking the language
of
their home country.Let those youngsters try
to
speak at home in the languageof their parents, let them tryto read—a few minutes
a
day—some of the literature written in the native language oftheir" parents, and they willserve America the best. Theywill help to understand truthfully
the
cauntries
we are
dealing with in our efforts
to
help
the
world
to
remainfree!"The knowledge
of
foreignlanguages tends to broaden ourus better and more valuableintellectual horizons and makesmembers
of
our own nation.The knowledge
of a
foreigntongue enables us to read theoriginal works
of
famouswriters and to draw upon thereal informations which otherwise would escape our attention or which we would knowonly from the interpretation bysome other people whose interests may
be
entirely
dif
ferent from our own or fromthose of the United States.
If
this is true of any foreign language, than the more important
it is
to know the native
Close Finish Seen in NewarkBowling Division
By STEPHEN KURLAKof 907. and the best three-game series with
a
total
of
2.557 pins. The
St.
John'sC.W.V. aggregation followedwith second best in both cat-Six games remain to be played by the teams in the Newark Division
of
the U.N.A.Bowling Leogue
of
the Metropolitan N.Y.-N.J. Area before their thirty-three weeks
j
ogories. registering 896 and2,400, respectively. Fred Hub-ka was the outstanding bowler for the night, scoring thehighest single game
of
232pins, and
a
series of 621.The Jersey City Division,which had completed its thirty-week schedule on April 30lh,held its end-of-season banqueton May 9th
at
the MissirisRestaurant"
in
Jersey City.More details about this function are reportcd elsewhere inthis issue.schedule comes
to a
close.With the possibility
of a
tiebetween the top two teams, thegnish promises" to be an exciting one. But
if
the secorfd-place U.N.A. Branch
272
quintet should lose one game,the heavy-rolling Newark Ukrainian Orthodox Church teamwill take, the championshipwithout dispute.In the matches
of
Friday.May 7th, last, the Churchmen rolled up the night's highest single game with
a
pin fall
i-
-r-
ROWMN'ii RESULTS OF FRIDAY, MAY, 7, 1954NEWARK DIVISIONUkr. Orthodox Church
(3)
Margarita
J. І49 164 148
Scheskowsky,N.15() 136
190
Porozok, W.
174
333
150
Porozok.
J.
169 ISO
1S7
Hubka, F. 179 210
232
Totals 827 S23 IM)7
good
forwhole?the country
as a
I will never forget
a
lecturegiven
at
the graduation exercises at one of the teacher colleges
in
Minnesota. The lec-.
«u u
, .ed what language besides Eng-turer—a young man, the head ,._
u
Ц „..i* 1,. mJf_
soul
of
this language fasterand truer than any one else.It is very important to knowUkrainian. Those who havebeen
in
military service realized this when they were ask-of
a
nationally known schoolin the West—told
of
the importance for the present dayAmericans to know
a
foreignlanguage besides their nativeEnglish. "When
I
received aninvitation to come to this colas well as reports on the ac-l Ukrainian Weekly, somethingtivities in all fields of endeavor.
I
that would make the AmericanIt
is
important
to
keep in
1
groups green with envy. Letrhhid
"the"
fact that the local
|
keep" this ftt mind at all* tonestown newspaper
is
anothergood publicity medium.
The
man
of
committee seekingpublicity for the U.N.A. branchshould always send copies ofthe material
to
the local papers, stressing that the branch
J
lish, they could speak. Thiswas
a
practical application ofthe knowledge
of a
foreignlanguage for the service
to
America.At
the
present time thelHO'cVBh^,
S
United States
is
in
a
leadingГ. Branch 272Banit, W.Wowehu.-k,
P.
Chymiy, A.Kalba, .1.Rewiski, W.HandicapTotalsPenn-Jersey Social Club (2) Ukrainian-American Yets (1)Kufta.
J. 170
Molinsky,
P. 176
Tofel, W.
209
Korytko, W.
168
Molinsky. W.
163
Kranetz, A.Handicap
4
Totals
890
St. Johns C.W.Y.
Kacaper, S.Salabun, 'MTango, M.Janick, L.147164149
177;
1791591341П7186-1314771<2)163191156170216172156155166
Popacn, M.Golumbuski, APrychoda. AZolto.
h.
lege," he stated, "I was really Position in the world, and it is]very much pleased
to
go toi
our dut
V
to
inform the Ameri-your State, because
in
my \
caa
P
ubUc about th
«
hla
tory.mind there was
n
picture Of J culture,', economics , and .other,, а
Щ
Scandinavian' Minnesota.[Phases
of
life
of
the people]by publicizing our branchee
wlt
^
those
big
8turdy Swe
des
who
«• the closest
to
us
in
r-rtfr^le
f}\*
nrt^oitoa tbort nfnnrill
r
m
*\ л
*_ l
Totals ...816 896
751
155 Struck, P.4808 Totals
741
Ukrainian sitch
(l)
Ш Urban,
A.
161 Blind172 Chuy.
P. '
166 Lytwyn.'M.141 Fern.
B.
і I Handicap
'
Totalsі
l
regularly, because then we willbe supporting both our branches and our newspaper. The onegoes hand
in
glove with theother.Theodore Lutwiniakbe deceased—how
he
feels,about her now? In majority of jcases those persons—old
or;
young- lack the proper words
Book Review
(Concluded from page
2)
V.'e Americans arc proud for< 10th as
a
national holiday foradding to our national holidays mothers."another day to celebrate, Moth-j
In
1912 the state
of
Texasere'o
Day,
This beautiful cus- accepted Jams' idea
by
ob-tom reserved for giving spe- serving that day and pardon-
j
jj
tcrate
answered That qufes-j
were
demolished and levelledcial tribute to our mothers is.ing prisoners
on
that гіау.|ц
£
п verv express
iy
an
d
т
re
_
in
Ukraine hundreds
of the
to express their true feelings help". The Ukrainians
of
theabout their mothers.
I
remem-i Western Ukrainian lands knowber when
I
was
a
mere child,'very well how this "brotherlymy grandmother was asked. help" was expressed in Dnieperhow she felt about her 92 year Ukraine, (i.e. Ukraine underold mother who died then. My
J
the Soviets before 1941). OnGrandma who though was H-t orders » from Moscow, theregradually spreading
all
overthe world.
It is
only fair
to
expect that with ?h>? spreadingof this noble id
a
of honoringmothers of the world there willalso spread the good name ofour coimt-y whi<h originatedthat holiday.It
is
said that the actual
',
Other states f о 11 owe d '
ст0
ег those words: "To me," most important monuments ofPennsylvania, made May 10th
she
4aid
.
4he doa
^
ofm
'
y
a state holiday. On May 10th.
motrhor
isе
as
a
dark sun-1913
a
resolution passed the
sotад a
terribly dark nig
ht.Senate and the House of Rep-
Thcre
wmbeno
sunshinc lefl
resentatives to make the sec-
f
or
т
л
now>
"on'i Sunday in May
a
national!io!idav "dedicated
to the
I have felt the same wayabout my mother when
I
lefther beyond the Iron CurtainTexas.
In
1913 Anna's slate,credit
for
the origination of
j
memory of the best mother inMother's Day belongs
to
the
і
the world, your mother." Thus
j
when
I
came to America.
I
feltAmerican woman, named Jar-'this great idea became
a
real- L
ou
|,iy despondent later
on
vis of Philadelphia.
It
was in•*>'•when my mother became
ill
that city of brotherly love that
I
This holiday
is
growing all and
I
could not assist her:Annan's mother died, (on Sun-lover the world.
It
is observed when she was hungry andday. May
9,
1007). Anna in-j through some distinct act of' needed food and
I
could notvited her friends to her home kindness, visit, letter, gift or
і
help her as the commies wouldand asked thun to help her to tribute
to
show remembrance
j
let no packages come throughremember her the memory
of of
the mother
to
whom gen-
to the
Ukraine.
To
makeher dear mother bv observing Ural affection
is
due. This is. things worse, the Bolshevikithe anniversary
of
the death,the usual way this wonderfulof their own mothers. This custom is observed in America.practice resulted in the organi-} It
is in
this way Americazation which started to observe! wishes the rest of the world tothe second Sunday in May as.celebrate it.Mother's Day. Miss Jarvis be-1
It is
indeed
a
splendid waycame
a
missionary of the idea, to celebrate those mothersshe made speeches, wrote let- whom we could see.ters. pleaded with influential Ask any one who had
a
public men
to
observe May mother and who happened
to
would keep my packages, thatI sent to my mother, In Moscow for 4-5 months and thenthey would return them backto USA stamping them: "Returned to sender, Refused bythe addressee".
I
knew thatit was not true but
I
coulddo nothing about it. Later onmy heart bled again for mybringing the Spirit of the oldcountry and imparting theircharacter
to
the surroundingpopulation.
I
was eager
to
visit
the
Swedish Churchesand homes to see all this for
myself.
I went to
a
Swedish Churchlast Sunday. To be sure, theservices were
in
Swedish, butwhat surprised me was
the
fact that there were only theold folks in the Church. "Whereare your young people,"
I
inquired some
of
the parishion
ers.
"They do not come to theChurch too often"—was
the
answer, ""bur young peopleconsider that we should notpray
in
Swedish, but shouldchange
to
the English language, because many
of
themdo not understand well the language of their parents."Ukrainian architecture, beginning with monuments
of
theXI century, numerous museumsand other artistic collectionswere robbed and destroyed,valuable objects
of
precious|j
n
his opinion those youngmetals were sold
in
Western people did not understand theEurope, and other precious ,
(rond
of
t
j
me8-
Now
AmericaWorks were destroyed and
і
s
the
i
eader
of
the free wor
i
d
.
Europe. Our country, America,should know the truest pictureof the life of every nation withwhich our government dealsduring these trying times.There
is a
wealth
of
information you can gain from theUkrainian writings, scientificand otherwise.
By
knowingthe Ukrainian language, youcan contribute enormously
to
a better understanding
of
theUkrainian question which is soimportant at the present time.There are
so
many literarypearls
in
the Ukrainian language not known
to
anyonebeside those who can read Ukrainian. You may translatethose works in English. Thereis no difficulty in^pubiishing
a
real good fiction
or
non fiction book. And there are
so
few translations from the Uk-