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Table Of Contents

Everything You Need to Know before We Start
The Power of Names and Numbers
What Does It Take to Create a Universe?
Crossing Over
More Data, More Power, Few Controls
Unstoppable Momentum
By the Numbers
Where Did the Secrets Go?
How the Future Worked in the Past
Authentication and the Exception Economy
How It Works in Tampa
What the Software Knows
Yes, Probably
Does It Work?
More Faces in View
Walk with Me
Keep Walking
Do the Math
Draw the Lines
Eternally Vigilant?
I Want This Why?
About Those Cameras
Data at Rest
The Rules
We Are the Boundary
The Technical Stuff: Telematics
Who Hears What
The More You Give, the More You Get
Who’s Driving?
What the Owner Wants
Cars Without Secrets, Now
What the Car Knows
Suppose
Private by Intention
What Can Policy Do?
Call Me Any Time
Speaking of Enhancing Performance
Making the Drivers Smart
Smart Cars, Yes
It’s Simple, Not
Hunter’s First Law
How Scenarios Work
The Scenarios for Social Structures
The Quadrants
The Engineered Society
The Lost and Lonely
The Conscientious Objectors
The Network Army
I Repeat: The Network Is an Amplifier
Disruptive, Quite
Business Without Secrets
Interviewing Raymond
Hackers and Crackers
From Communities to Network Army
Open Source Is More Than Open Source
Yeah, It’s a High-Performance Team
Is This Message Clear?
The Medium and the Message
Why They Listen
Power Grabs, Not
Ideological Conflict and Corruption
Nemesis and the Network Army
Can I Be Your Enemy?
Generals Are Always Fighting the Last War
The Message and the Medium, and the Audience for Linux
If You’re Losing the Battles, Change the Battlefield
Free Stuff Kills Competitors, Not Markets
Why Not Just Let the Market Do Its Work?
Maybe Someone Can Be Convinced
How Did Things Get So Bad?
A Few Pointers for Engineered Society Generals
Hunter’s Second Law
Mentats Have (Hidden) Power
Mentats Provide Less Information
The Network Mentat
The Mentat Reviewer
Choose Your Mentat
Mentats and the Law of Inertia
Mentats and I-Filters
Hunter’s Second Law—Personal and Institutional Conflict
Breaking the Bubble
Would Breaking the Bubble Have Saved Cisco?
Reality Always Wins (in the World Without Secrets and Everywhere Else)
On the Interactions of Laws
The Path of Least Resistance
It’s Easier If You Don’t Ask
Did McVeigh Do It?
The Necessary Knowledge Is That of What to Observe
What Do You See?
What Drives the Exception Economy?
A Portrait of the Artist as a Very Big (or Little) Number
The Business Is a Network
Art Is Exceptional, Objects Are Not
Who Wins and Who Loses?
Relationships Matter: The Fate of the Music Industry
The Economics of Long-Playing Plastic
Yes, It Really Works Just Like That
Independents: They’re Everywhere Are They Dangerous?
What about the Relationship?
Strategies for Record Industry Viability
Strategy 1: Kill Digital Distribution
Strategy 2: Monopolize Bandwidth
Strategy 3: Prohibit Alternative Business Models
Yeah, It’s about Technology
The Lessons
It’s Not the Transaction, It’s the Database
Mass Victimization
Why Worry?
Engineered Society Warfare and the Terrorist
Network-Centric Warfare
Crackers at War: Threat or Menace?
What’s Potential and What’s Real?
What to Do, Right Now
On the Morning
What Happened after Pearl Harbor
A Pearl Harbor for the New Century
A Dream of Electronic Handcuffs
Under Observation
If Automated Surveillance Works, Whom Does It Work On?
The Issue Is Control
The Return of the Engineered Society
Who’s Not on the Team?
Pearl Harbor in the Borderless World
Notes
Index
P. 1
World Without Secrets: Business, Crime, and Privacy in the Age of Ubiquitous Computing

World Without Secrets: Business, Crime, and Privacy in the Age of Ubiquitous Computing

Ratings: (0)|Views: 119 |Likes:
Published by Wiley
The future of computing-the future of business
Rapid technological innovation is moving us towards a world of ubiquitous computing-a world in which we are surrounded by smart machines that are always on, always aware, and always monitoring us. These developments will create a world virtually without secrets in which information is widely available and analyzable worldwide. This environment will certainly affect business, government, and the individual alike, dramatically affecting the way organizations and individuals interact. This book explores the implications of the coming world and suggests and explores policy options that can protect individuals and organizations from exploitation and safeguard the implicit contract between employees, businesses, and society itself. World Without Secrets casts an unflinching eye on a future we may not necessarily desire, but will experience.
The future of computing-the future of business
Rapid technological innovation is moving us towards a world of ubiquitous computing-a world in which we are surrounded by smart machines that are always on, always aware, and always monitoring us. These developments will create a world virtually without secrets in which information is widely available and analyzable worldwide. This environment will certainly affect business, government, and the individual alike, dramatically affecting the way organizations and individuals interact. This book explores the implications of the coming world and suggests and explores policy options that can protect individuals and organizations from exploitation and safeguard the implicit contract between employees, businesses, and society itself. World Without Secrets casts an unflinching eye on a future we may not necessarily desire, but will experience.

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Publish date: Oct 16, 2002
Added to Scribd: Sep 09, 2010
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780471256786
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Publishers Weekly reviewed this
The warning bell about our rapidly disappearing privacy is sounded again albeit none too stridently in this study of new technologies and their impact. Hunter, a vice-president at Gartner's Research organization, a business technology consulting group, wants to sketch out how the omnipresence of computers affects every last centimeter of modern human existence. His first chapter, "Why Won't They Leave Me Alone?" is most to the point, asking, on the subject of Internet commerce, "Is the convenience of being known everywhere worth the risk of being known everywhere?" More worrisome than having a digital signature follow you everywhere online he uses the example of Amazon.com's ability to remember things you've bought or even just looked at is the ubiquity of surveillance in public and private spaces. One chapter addresses the tracking of cars, relating the story of a man who was fined $450 for driving his rental car over the speed limit. It wasn't the police that caught him it was a global positioning satellite system in the car. From there, Hunter assays such subjects as the Open Source debate (over making the source codes of commercial operating systems and applications available to the public) and Internet crime. While each of the chapters is useful by itself, Hunter's thesis gets progressively fainter as the book goes on. Very little is resolved by the end of this less-than-groundbreaking study, but it may still be interesting for those new to the subject. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

2002-04-08, Publishers Weekly
davidpwhelan_1 reviewed this
It is amazing how little people require in the way of convenience or compensation before they are willing to exchange private information. Credit card use provides a tracking mechanism, frequent flier and other brand-loyalty cards track spending and other habits, and our Web activity is tracked.I'm really not that paranoid, but found this book to be (mostly) well-written and thought provoking. Mr. Hunter relies on some pretty common stories of identity theft and the like but it's the overall picture he paints that is interesting. One forgets, in the normal course of life, how often we do things - type in passwords, log onto computers, pass through secured portals (work, school, etc.), pay with traceable items like checks and plastic - that pinpoint where we are and what we are doing. I fully support the librarians (my own "profession") for their outspoken opposition to the USA Patriot Act and General Ashcroft. At least I know one segment of my life is protected from unmonitored invasion.
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