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Table Of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
The Unveiling
Sins of the Fathers
The Rise
The Magic
The Wall
The German Patient
The Pitch
The Recovery
The Prince
Curves Ahead
Notes
Index
P. 1
Getting the Bugs Out: The Rise, Fall, and Comeback of Volkswagen in America

Getting the Bugs Out: The Rise, Fall, and Comeback of Volkswagen in America

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Published by Wiley
The fascinating story of Volkswagen's raging success and nearcollapse in America

After a wild ride of ups and downs for almost three decades,Volkswagen has regained its stature as one of America's mostbeloved auto makers. In Getting the Bugs Out, journalist and autoindustry expert David Kiley tells the complete story of the rise,fall, and comeback of Volkswagen. Kiley traces the company's risefrom Ferdinand Porsche's original design for the Beetle, throughthe Nazi era, and up to the Beetle's ascendancy during theflower-power 1960s. He explores the reasons for VW's downwardspiral through the 1970s and 1980s, including the devastatingmanagement blunders that led to such failed efforts as the Rabbit,Dasher, Thing, and Scirocco, and equally catastrophic marketinginitiatives, culminating in the notorious "Fahrfegnugen" series ofads. Finally, drawing upon his unique access to company insiders,Kiley tells the story of how Volkswagen achieved its phenomenalcomeback beginning in the late 1990s through a combination ofvisionary management, cutting-edge product development, andbrilliant marketing and advertising strategies.

David Kiley (Anne Arbor, MI), the Detroit Bureau Chief atUSA Today, is a journalist with fifteen years of experience, ten ofwhich have been devoted to covering the auto industry. He haswritten extensively for Adweek and Brandweekmagazines.

The fascinating story of Volkswagen's raging success and nearcollapse in America

After a wild ride of ups and downs for almost three decades,Volkswagen has regained its stature as one of America's mostbeloved auto makers. In Getting the Bugs Out, journalist and autoindustry expert David Kiley tells the complete story of the rise,fall, and comeback of Volkswagen. Kiley traces the company's risefrom Ferdinand Porsche's original design for the Beetle, throughthe Nazi era, and up to the Beetle's ascendancy during theflower-power 1960s. He explores the reasons for VW's downwardspiral through the 1970s and 1980s, including the devastatingmanagement blunders that led to such failed efforts as the Rabbit,Dasher, Thing, and Scirocco, and equally catastrophic marketinginitiatives, culminating in the notorious "Fahrfegnugen" series ofads. Finally, drawing upon his unique access to company insiders,Kiley tells the story of how Volkswagen achieved its phenomenalcomeback beginning in the late 1990s through a combination ofvisionary management, cutting-edge product development, andbrilliant marketing and advertising strategies.

David Kiley (Anne Arbor, MI), the Detroit Bureau Chief atUSA Today, is a journalist with fifteen years of experience, ten ofwhich have been devoted to covering the auto industry. He haswritten extensively for Adweek and Brandweekmagazines.

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Publish date: Apr 22, 2002
Added to Scribd: Sep 09, 2010
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780471225980
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Publishers Weekly reviewed this
The story of how a rigid German automaker stormed the American market with its lovable Beetle, virtually disappeared, then came roaring back is told here by USA Today's Detroit bureau chief. Part skeptic, part admirer, Kiley details the car's roots in Nazi Germany, suggesting it grew out of Hitler's obsession with creating an autobahn and giving German citizens the chance to have their own cheap cars to drive on it. When VW infiltrated America in the 1950s, it found itself fighting Detroit's lumbering giants, who believed Americans simply desired a steady stream of gas-guzzling, chrome-plated behemoths. By remedying the almost complete lack of affordable cars with good mileage, the Beetle was able to overcome its strange appearance, weak engine and reputation of being "Hitler's car" and quickly developed a dedicated following, thanks to whimsical, innocent ads. But in the 1970s, cheap, reliable Japanese compacts began eating away at the Beetle's lead, and through the '80s, the company was mostly dormant in America, with Beetles supplying only collectors. Then, in 1994, VW bowled over the press with its presentation of the new Beetle. Another series of engaging ads helped put it into the limelight and return to a prominent position. Kiley is realistic about VW's future, noting that Beetle sales have been dropping off and other brands like Passat are not picking up the slack. Although Kiley pays too much attention to the advertising end of things this is an Adweek Book, after all he deftly reports on the mystique and the reality of one of the auto world's enduring legends. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

2001-10-01, Publishers Weekly
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