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PACT Case Study 10-16-07 Before Peer Review

PACT Case Study 10-16-07 Before Peer Review

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WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT PROGRAM (WEP)
NEPAL
PACT
WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT PROGRAM (WEP)
NEPAL
PACT

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Published by: Poverty Outreach Working Group (POWG) on Sep 09, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/31/2011

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W
OMEN
S
E
MPOWERMENT
P
ROGRAM
(WEP)N
EPAL
P
ACT
SEEP N
ETWORK 
S
P
OVERTY 
O
UTREACH
W
ORKING
G
ROUP
S
MF/MED A
PPROACHES
 T
ARGETING
V
ERY 
P
OOR
P
EOPLE
C
ASE
S
TUDY 
N
O
. X
Jan P. MaesOctober, 2007
 
T
ABLE
 
OF
C
ONTENTS
Executive Summary .............................................................................................................i1. Context ...........................................................................................................................11.2. Local context – target area ....................................................................................... 22. Organizational Framework ...........................................................................................122.1. International Organization .....................................................................................122.2. Local organization ................................................................................................. 163. Description of “Very Poor” Target Group ....................................................................203.2. Socioeconomic conditions .....................................................................................214. Poverty Targeting and Assessment ...............................................................................244.1. Poverty measurement practices ..............................................................................244.2. Available Poverty Data ..........................................................................................244.3. Poverty Targeting ...................................................................................................255. Products and Services ................................................................................................... 275.2. Microenterprise Development Services .................................................................335.3. Non-financial Services ...........................................................................................345.4. Design and Product Development: .......................................................................365.5. Implementation Process ........................................................................................42......................................................................................................................................446. Results ...........................................................................................................................456.1. Method of measuring results ...................................................................................456.2. Impact .................................................................................................................... 456.3. Cost Effectiveness and Sustainability ...................................................................46
 
Executive Summary
The Women Empowerment Project (WEP) was a USAID funded project that took placein Nepal from 1998 to 2001, and was carried out by Pact, its NGO partner ECTA, and anetwork of local NGOs at the district level.With 10years’ experience in Nepal, Pact had a long-term commitment in the country towomen’s issues, the promotion of literacy, the growth of democracy and increasing theeconomic and social status of vulnerable peoples. Pact began in Nepal managing asubgrant for World Education to develop
 Naya Goreto
, a national literacy programfunded by USAID. With the opening of Pact’s first office in Nepal in 1988, an expandeddesign team helped to further 
 Naya Goreto’s
reach. In 1994, Pact received a grant fromUSAID to implement an innovative pilot project, Women Reading for Development(WORD). Working through 1,100 NGOs, WORD reached women in 70 of the country’s75 districts with remarkable results. Through WORD, over 550,000 women participatedin adult literacy classes and nearly 350,000 Nepali women learned to read at a third gradelevel.While this project proved the role of literacy to be a powerful entry point for workingwith women, it did not address the priority needs expressed by women, especially incomegeneration. Further, Pact recognized that there was a serious shortage of post-literacymaterials geared to rural neoliterate women. At the same time USAID’s research foundthat, compared to those who only complete literacy classes, women who furthered their skills through post-literacy courses had higher self-confidence, more children whoattended school, and increased involvement in collective activities. This evidence,combined with women’s continuing demand for literacy, their hunger for post-literacymaterials, and the top priority they gave to learning how to increase family incomes,demanded yet another approach. USAID/Nepal decided to embark on a new strategy thatwould promote economic empowerment as the focal point for furthering women’sliteracy skills. In doing so, USAID/Nepal became the only mission in the world to makewomen a primary objective of its national strategy. During this same period Pact alsoundertook its own research, leading to the development of the first
Savings
and
Credit 
series, which was piloted in western Nepal.WEP delivered a package of literacy, savings, credit, microenterprise, and microfinanceto a target population of over 120,000 women in 21 Terai districts. Starting in 1999, Pactintroduced its new action-oriented curriculum,
Women in Business
, to 125,000 womenthrough over 100 field staff and 240 indigenous organizations. These organizations were primarily NGOs but also included cooperatives, Nirdhan (a Grameen bank replicator),and Parks and People funded by UNDP. In addition, over 800 Empowerment Workershired by the local partners provided training and technical support.Women were mobilized by local NGOs in predominantly rural areas, and either formednew groups or continued to work together in already existing literacy groups establishedduring WORD, cooperatives or solidarity groups connected to Nirdhan. While there wasi

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