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HIST103SyllFall2010

HIST103SyllFall2010

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Published by: gae24341 on Sep 10, 2010
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PENN STATE UNIVERSITYHISTORY 103
HISTORY OF MADNESS AND PSYCHIATRY IN THE WESTERN WORLDFALL 2010PROF. GREG EGHIGIAN
“Madness is deceptive” (1669). This is an illustration from
 Der Abentheuerliche Simplicissimus, Teutsch
(
The AdventurousSimplicissimus
) written by Hans Jakob Christoffel von Grimmelshausen (1621-1676). The novel, based on Grimmelshausen’s ownlife, chronicles the development of a child against the backdrop of the brutal Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648).
Course Description
More than perhaps any other set of human afflictions, the phenomena that have gone under the names of “madness,” “insanity,” “lunacy,” and “mental illness” have historically provoked a widevariety of often contradictory reactions. Those who have been in the throes of “madnesshave described experiences ranging from an ecstatic sense of holiness to being beset byundeniable impulses to feelings of unending despair. Observers have sought explanations forthe behavior of “touched” and “crazy” individuals by invoking such things as sin, destiny,heredity, moral degeneracy, upbringing, trauma, fatigue, and body chemistry. Thoseafflicted have been admired, pitied, mocked, hidden from public view, canonized,imprisoned, restrained, operated on, sterilized, hospitalized, killed, counseled, analyzed, andmedicated. Why?
1
 
Course Information
Location and Time: M+W 11:15 pm-12:05 pm (112 Walker) + Friday discussion sectionsOffice Phone: 865-9951Office: 212 WeaverOffice Hours: Wednesdays, 1:30-3 pm + by appointmentEmail:gae2@psu.edu(I check my mail frequently during the day – the best way to reachme)Teaching Assistants: Bill Cossen (wsc5037@psu.edu) and Rebekah Harris(reh5169@psu.edu)
Required Texts
Edward Shorter,
 History of Psychiatry from the Era of the Asylum to the Age of Prozac
(John Wiley and Sons, 1998)Greg Eghigian, ed.,
From Madness to Mental Health: Psychiatric Disorder and its Treatment in Western Civilization
(Rutgers University Press, 2010)The books are on sale at the University Bookstore.
Grading, Requirements, Policies
Your final grade will be determined on the basis of 
three open-book exams (3/4)and participation in Friday discussion sections (1/4)
. No electronic devices are allowedto be used during exams. YOU SHOULD BRING THE READER
FROM MADNESSTO MENTAL HEALTH (FMMH)
TO ALL DISCUSSION SECTIONS. Make-up examswill be granted only in exceptional circumstances, and they will be, as a general rule,more difficult than the original exam itself. Failure to take any exam or to regularlyattend discussion sections will result in a final grade of “F.”NOTE: The instructors reserve the right to add other assignments if studentperformance warrants it.Academic Integrity: Students are not permitted to copy other people's answers,write papers or exams for others, have someone write their papers or exams for them, orplagiarize the works of anyone else. Students who are found to be in violation of theserules will receive academic sanctions and may be reported to the University's JudicialAffairs office for possible further disciplinary action.PLEASE NOTE: If you anticipate needing any kind of accommodation in thiscourse due to disability or have questions about physical access to the building, pleaseinform the instructor as soon as possible.2
 
SCHEDULEI. THE PNEUMATIC AGE
WEEK I. Madness in the Ancient World I: Religious PerspectivesAug 23 IntroductionAug 25
The Bible
, 1 Samuel (ca. 960 B.C.E.) in
From Madness to Mental Health(hereafter, FMMH)
, 10-18Aug 27 Euripides,
The Bacchae
(ca. 404 B.C.E.),
FMMH 
, 18-30WEEK II. Madness in the Ancient World II: Medical PerspectivesAug 30 Hippocrates (460-377 B.C.E.), Writings on Hysteria (ca. 4
th
centuryB.C.E.),
FMMH 
, 30-36Sep 1
The Bible
, Mark 5 (ca. 65-75 C. E.),
FMMH 
, 36-39Sept 3Soranus (ca. 2
nd
century C.E.), “Madness or Insanity (Greek Mania),”
FMMH 
, 39-46WEEK III. Medieval and Early Modern EuropeSep 6 LABOR DAY – NO CLASSSep 8 Sarabiyun Ibn Ibrahim, “Three Cases of Melancholia by Rufus of Ephesus” (ca. 873),
FMMH 
, 47-50Ibn Sina [Avicenna] (ca. 980-1037), “Lovesickness” (1
st
Latin translation12
th
century),
FMMH 
, 50-53Sep 10 John Brydall (ca. 1635–ca. after 1705),
The Law Relating to NaturalFools, Mad-Folks, and Lunatick Persons
(1700),
FMMH 
, 73-80
II. THE AGE OF OPTIMISM
WEEK IV. Enlightenment, Romanticism, and ReformSep 13 Hermann Boerhaave (1668-1738), “Aphorisms” (1765),
FMMH 
, 80-85Sep 15 Philippe Pinel (1745-1826),
 A Treatise on Insanity
(1801),
FMMH 
, 94-105Sep 17 Johann Christian August Heinroth (1773-1843),
Textbook on Disturbances of Mental Life
(1818),
FMMH 
, 105-111WEEK V.Sep 20Shorter,
 History of Psychiatry
, 1-32FILM:
 Madness of King George
(UK, 1995)Sep 22
 Madness of King George
continuedSep 24
EXAM 1
3

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