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Guinean Forests of West Africa EcoSystem - Upper Guinean Forest Ecosystem)

Guinean Forests of West Africa EcoSystem - Upper Guinean Forest Ecosystem)

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Published by: Birdlife International Pacific Partnership on Sep 10, 2010
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09/10/2010

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Ecosystem Profile
 
UPPER GUINEAN FOREST ECOSYSTEMOf theGUINEAN FORESTS OF WEST AFRICABIODIVERSITY HOTSPOT
Final versiondecember 14, 2000
 
 
 
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CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................................3BACKGROUND: THE GUINEAN FOREST HOTSPOT...........................................................4BIOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE OF THE GUINEAN FOREST HOTSPOT...............................5The Coastal Connection.............................................................................................................6Levels of Species Diversity, Endemism and Flagship Species for Conservation.....................6Levels of Protection for Biodiversity.........................................................................................9THREAT ASSESSMENT...........................................................................................................10The Effects of Poverty.............................................................................................................10Tropical Rainforest Loss and Fragmentation: The Effects of Agriculture, Logging andPopulation Growth...................................................................................................................11Ecosystem Degradation: The Effects of Mineral Extraction, Hunting and Overharvesting...12Limited Local Capacity for Conservation: The Effects of Insufficient Professional Resourcesand Minimal Biodiversity Information....................................................................................13Governance: The Effects of Political and Cultural Fragmentation and Civil Conflict............13ASSESSMENT OF CURRENT INVESTMENT........................................................................14Multilateral and Bilateral Investment......................................................................................14Regional Programs of International Support...........................................................................14 National Government Agencies...............................................................................................15 National Programs that have Received International Support for Biodiversity..................16Côte d'Ivoire.........................................................................................................................16Ghana...................................................................................................................................17Guinea..................................................................................................................................18Liberia..................................................................................................................................19Sierra Leone.........................................................................................................................19 NGOs.......................................................................................................................................19Academic Institutions..............................................................................................................20Research Institutions................................................................................................................21Private Sector...........................................................................................................................22CEPF NICHE FOR INVESTMENT IN THE REGION.............................................................22CEPF INVESTMENT STRATEGY AND PROGRAM FOCUS...............................................23Research: Catalyzing Comprehensive Biological Surveys in Priority Areas......................25Institutional Assessments and Policy Instruments...............................................................26Transfrontier Collaboration.................................................................................................28Cluster 1: Sierra Leone-Liberia......................................................................................28Cluster 2: Liberia-Côte d'Ivoire......................................................................................29Cluster 3: Côte d'Ivoire–Ghana........................................................................................31Conservation Corridor Coordination and Strategies............................................................32SUSTAINABILITY.....................................................................................................................33CONCLUSION............................................................................................................................34APPENDIX 1...............................................................................................................................35APPENDIX 2...............................................................................................................................46
 
 
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INTRODUCTION
The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) is designed to better safeguard the world'sthreatened biological hotspots in developing countries. It is a joint initiative of ConservationInternational (CI), the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the Government of Japan, theMacArthur Foundation and the World Bank. CEPF provides financing to projects located in biodiversity hotspots — highly threatened regions representing only 1.4 percent of the planet'sland surface, where some 60 percent of all terrestrial species diversity is found.CEPF has been designed to build on the World Bank's commitment to biodiversityconservation and sustainable management, primarily implemented through the GEF andchanneled to governments. CEPF will complement the efforts of the World Bank and the GEFto conserve biodiversity conservation by providing a streamlined funding mechanism to a broadrange of civil society partners, including NGOs, community groups and private sector partners.CEPF will further the overall goals of the Bank at the country level by offering anopportunity to engage local communities and other stakeholders in biodiversity conservation andecosystem management. CEPF will also provide an important learning experience through aninnovative online grant system atwww.cepf.netand by focusing on on-the-ground results andexperience. The site is designed to serve as a central node, disseminating lessons learned andfacilitating cross-regional information exchange on conservation successes. It will also promotereplication of successful projects by providing access to a wide range of resources designed toaid project implementers in the biodiversity hotspots.CEPF will strive to use lessons from other programs, particularly the GEF's mediumgrants procedure, to ensure that funds are provided expeditiously and with appropriate, cost-effective levels of accountability. CEPF will also use the GEF national focal points to ensureclient country endorsement of the strategic direction of CEPF. CEPF is intended to complement,rather than duplicate or overlap with, regular GEF activities.CEPF will support strategic working alliances among community groups, NGOs,government, academia and the private sector, combining unique capacities and eliminatingduplication of efforts for a more comprehensive approach to conservation challenges. CEPF isunique among other funding mechanisms in that it focuses specifically on biological areas rather than political boundaries and will look at conservation threats on a corridor-wide basis for maximum return on investment. In the case of West Africa, the majority of previous funding has been country-specific, making CEPF one of the early transboundary mechanisms used in theregion. The strategic directions of the CEPF program are based on a priority-setting process thathas taken place in the region, and target funding gaps in the larger regional strategy. Building onthe collaborative processes already underway in the region will allow cooperation in an area richin biological value yet straddling several national borders. Clearly, a regional approach will bemore effective than a national one. In addition, CEPF has taken steps to assess current levels of funding in the region and aims to disburse funds to civil society in a more agile manner,complementing current funding available to government agencies.Funds will be used to provide small grants to conservation projects managed by private, NGO, and civil society groups working in the critical ecosystems. Funding from CEPF at the project level will leverage additional financial and in-kind contributions. By funding

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